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Full text of "Recreation"

HARVARD UNIVERSITY. 




LIBRARY 



OF THE 



MUSEUM OF COMPARATIVE ZOOLOGY 

re; 773 

Bequest of 
WILLIAM BREWSTER 




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IWILLIAM BREWSTERI IE 



9 c*~~Jfr «4-*t«-*JL YuOt^ 



DEC 4 1920 



VOLUME XVII. 
NUriBER 1 



JULY, 1902 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 



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An Account of Two Trips in North- 



j*^ jt it T\ r T ~~1\ - An Account of Two Trips in r> 

On the Nez Perces Trail ; srs&ffifr sr 1 



Thin 




Sportsmen 
Want 




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A BOUT this time of year every man 

a drop of red blood in his veins 
think of the fishing, hunting and camp 
which he will make during warm 

If there's anything worse than not taking 
such an outing, it's taking the outing without 
the right kind of equipment. 

You cannot fish or hunt or camp to the best 
advantage without one or all of the articles 
shown in the border about this 
page. The same goods in other 
sizes, styles and prices are 
shown in our folder A 
— free for the asking. 

Marble's Sporting 
Specialties are for sale by 
dealers, or prepaid, direct 
from factory, on receipt 




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f price. 



riarble Safety 
Axe Company 

GLADSTONE, MICH , U.S.A. 






#1. 



65* 







REC REATION 

Copyright, December, 1901, by G. O. Shields 



A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



$1.00 a Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 
Standing on an Old Fine Log, One Foot in the Trap, He Glared at Me — Frontispiece 

PAGE 

Trapping a Mountain Lion. Illustrated Chas. A. Friedel 3 

Wild Goat Shooting on the Desertas Lawrence Mott 7 

On the Nez Perces Trail. Illustrated Westley Jones 7 

Looks Like Rain. Poem Tidd Murray ii 

The Mystery of a Bullet • • Charles W. Sawyer 13 

Cole. Illustrated C. E. Pleas 16 

A Deer Hunt in Lost Park H. J. L. Barnes 19 

Twenty-one Grizzlies in Sight W.H.Wright 2 

My Battle With a Great Horned Owl F. G. E. Buerger 23 

A Memory. Poem Edith M. Church 24 

How the Quails Were Preserved David Bruce 25 

The Lesser Scaup. Illustrated Allan Brooks 26 

Song of the Robin. Poem jr. Rev. R. S. Stringfellow 27 

An Ideal Vacation •• C.H.Dillon 29 

The Things I Love- Poem W.S.Jones 29 

A Mountain Sheep in Domestication. Illustrated. Mowry Bates 31 

To Improve the Service in Yellowstone Paik E. V. Wilcox 36 

Sheriff McFee's Big Bass Poem C . C . H ask ins 38 

39 Forestry 62 

45 Pure and Impure Foods 64 

49 Publisher's Notes 66 

54 Editor's Corner 69 

58 Amateur Photography 75 



From the Game Fields. 

Fish and Fishing 

Guns and Ammunition 

Natural History 

The League of American Sportsmen 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, 1894. 




Elephant killed by Mr. Marcel Hendricks of Mossamedes, Africa, with a .303 Savage Rifle using the; Expanding Bullet. " Le Sport Universel 
Illustre " couta.ns an article with illustrations by Mr. Hendricks relative to the killing of the above. 

.EEP UP W1T1 MF\ A ^B 7 A ^F^\ *WF m \ ~ which is the Twentieth 

THE T.flES. ^^^ ^% m# ^m ■ W W4 me"lss y reJ™ting n nfle a Tn 

Do not buy a rifle un- ^ ^M M^^k ^mf #*^A m E M ^ ^ the world. Absolutely safe, 
til you have examined ^^g^ ^K J^ ^F ^L 3^ ^^^^^ J^K^m strongest shooter, flattest 
;into the merits of the " trajectory, also neatest and 

•most effective rifle manufactured. Highest development of sporting rifles. Constructed to shoot six diffeient cai fridges, 
■t<r may be used as a single shot without the slightest change in the mechanism. Adapted for Large and Small 
Game. .303 and 30-30 calibers. Every; rifle thoroughly guaranteed. Awarded Grand Gold Medal at Paris in 
comp.titiou with all other styles of repeating rifles. Write for new illustrated catalogue ('' G "). 

Manufacturers of SAVAGE Magazine and Magnetic Hammers. Send for Circular. 

SAVAGE ARMS CO., Utica, N. Y., U. S. A. 

Pacific Coast Agents : Baker & Hamilton, San Francisco and Sacramento, California. 



c. 



II 



RECREATION. 



4* • 

I THE I 

f SYRACUSE HAMMERLESS ! 



SHOT GUN 




All of our high-grade guns arc regularly supplied 
J§* with our patented automatic ejector. This is theonly 

T automatic ejector that has been thoroughly tested 

4* and tried, and found satisfactory in every respect* 

e|j Before purchasing a high-grade gun, or a gun with 

an automatic ejector, write to us for full descrip- 
«§» tion and prices. 

| Syracuse Arms Company, 

% SYRACUSE, N.Y., U.S. A. 

«|* Catalogue free upon application. Mention Recreation. 



4> 



RECREATION 



111 



StiQ&rswte 



ATHLETIC 
GOODS 



When In need of anything in Athletic and Sporting Goods get our 
quotations and catalogue, everything for outdoor and indoor sport 

We are running four bright, smart and up-to-date Sporting Goods stores in Greater New 
York, which enables us to buy (what we do not manufacture ) in quantities and get the 
lowest price. Not like the old time Sporting Goods Stores looking for ioo per cent 
profit. We select the best and well known makes of Sporting and Athletic Goods, then 
see how low and attractive we can make the price. Don't take our word for this, see 
prices of well-known goods quoted hereunder 

Golf, Tennis, Baseball, Fishing: Tackle, Billiards and Pool 

Pill p It has always been our claim — no Golf Club ever made worth more than $1.50. Last year 
**"^r we sold over three thousand of our No. 1 club at $1.25. This year we offer the same club, 
only better finished, a much better shaft and head, at 90c. 

No. 2 is the same club finished as good as money can make it ( shaft and head ) either wound or 
socket club for $1.25 This includes every make of clubs, Driver, Brassie Driver, Cleek, Irons, Mashie.-, 
Mid Irons, Putters, Lofters and Niblicks. Right or left hand in models of most popular styles. 

TC M M I O The Pim Racket, the one used by all professionals, is probably one 

I tliillOi of the 1 est Rackets made because it is the bes-t ideas of many 
players combined. We offer our Columbia or Princeton at $4.50 with this statement. 
It is the exact shape and size of Pim and as good, for which you pay $7.50, if not 
so return and get your money. Childs Victor 50c, Victor 80c, Cleveland $1.65, 
Newport $2.00, Berkley $2.25, Ingersoll Special $3.50. Tennis Balls, Newport 
Final 35c, Victor Champion 40c, Club tennis balls 23c 

BASEBALL UNIFORMS. 

Five years ago we commenced manufacturing our 

own Un iforms and that year cut up five thousand 

yards of cloth, since which time it has grown to 

40 thousand yards a season. Prices and quality 
can only account for this enormous increase. The 
following retail prices will compare favorably with most 
jobbers' prices. Each suit has shirt, pants, cap, belt, 
stockings and 8 letters on each shirt. 

Grade A, $2.50; B, $2.75; C, $3.75; D, $5.50; 
E, $7.50. Special discount to clubs. Send for samples 
and catalogue. Following a few quotations in supplies : 
Victor League Ball, $1.00; Louisville Slugger Bat, 50c; 
Louisville Taped Wound handle, 60c. ; Black Calf Base- 
ball Shoes, $2.25 ; full line Victor Gloves and Mits. 




BILLIARDS AND POOL. 




Burrowers Tables 
— the best tor 

home entertaining. Why pay a great price for billiards and pool table 

and then go to the top of house to play, when you can have both 

games (and various others) and play in any room in the house? Games 

with balls and cues have been in use for three hundred years, and 

still growing in favor. This table 
is no toy, it is real Pool and 

Billiards, made in sizes lor both old and young. On the $6.00, 
$7.0«>, $9.00 and $10.50 boards can be played Billiards and Pool 
as well as 23 other games, with outfits to play the entire 25 games. 
The smaller boards having a double face, while the larger boards, 
$15 00. $18.00, $21.00, $23.00, $27.00 and $30 00 the game is 
only Billiards and Pool, including Bottle Pool, Pin Pool and Ten 
Pins, being a practical Billiard and Pool table almost full size 3x6 
feet, balls, 1% and 1% inch. 

RflRQ A Kin RECTI Q No house in this country can offer 
nUUO Hllli nCtLO. to tne public a greater assoit- 
ment of Rods, Reels and supplies. It is said there are two thousand 
articles iu Fishing Supplies and it seems to us correct when we come to purchase the line. If we have 
omitted one article we don't know which one. We mention here a few: 

ROD NO. 2 l /i — 6 strips to each joint, 3 piece split bamboo, full nickel mount, solid reel seat, cork grip, 
6 to 9^ oz. 75c. No. 1. Same Rod as above only extra tip, $1.00. Others from $1.50 to $10.00 
which buvs the Bassett hand made Rod, Cedar inlaid butt or grip. Can furnish either salt or fresh water 
Rods in almost any price. Bait. Fly Casting or Boat Rods from 50c. up. 

REEL NO. 640 Multiplying Raised Pillar, Bal. Handle, Screwed Brass Nickel Plated, with Patent 
Adjustable Slide Drag and Back Sliding Click. 
Yards, 40 60 80 100 150 
Price, 45 55 60 75 85 

Mention Department 77 and Secure Baseball Score Card. 

Department 77 
67 Cortlandt St.. New York 




Robt. 6. Ingersoll $ Bro. 



IV 



RECREATION. 



SUMMERflLHSIIRE 






THE choice of the route has much to do with the success and pleasure of an outing. 
Probably nowhere in the world can a person secure more real, delightful comfort on 
a railway journey than on the great trains over the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry 
The splendid construction of this road, in track and equipment, and its pleasantness of route makes 
every mile one of comfort and pleasure. 

As a route for summer vacation travel the Lake Shore is unexcelled, reaching by its 
through trains, or by direct connections, practically all the summer places east and west. 

The following books will be sent free by the undersigned : " Book of Trains," telling 
about the service; "Vacation Journeys," containing a select list of tours to and via the St. 
Lawrence River ; the Adirondack and White Mountains ; the Atlantic Coast ; New England • 
Niagara Falls; Lake Chautauqua, etc., with rates from Chicago, 111., Toledo and Cleveland, O.; 
and an illustrated, descriptive book about Lake Chautauqua resorts. 

We shall be pleased to render any assistance and information in your vacation plans this 
summer. Address A. J. Smith, g. p. & t. a., Cleveland, O. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



THROUGH 



THE MOUNTAINS OF 
CAROLINA 



WESTERN NORTH 



"THE LAND OF THE SKY" 



A5HEVILLE, THE SAPPHIRE COUNTRY AND HOT SPRINGS 

Nowhere east of the Rocky Mountains is to be found anything approaching it for spring, summer 
and fall, and all-year-round retreat. 

ASHEVILLE AND THE SAPPHIRE COUNTRY 

With an average mean temperature of 59°, there is perfect freedom from torrid heat and the ter- 
rors of winter's 1 grasp. Her skies rival in their azurine tints those of Italy, and there is a vitality and 
tonic in the atmosphere which makes an instant impression on the visitor. It is a region more 
charmingly beautiful than Switzerland. Here range after range of heavily forested mountains 
parallel each other like waves of the sea, where interlacing valleys are rich with verdure and 
flowers, and c where silver streams murmur unceasingly.--' 

HOT SPRINGS, N. C. 

A place where rest and recreation can be most happily combined. ,T.he climate and baths are 
especially applicable for nervous and rheumatic troubles. The pure • mountain air, charming 
scenery and luxurious thermal baths are among the attractions, which justly render Hot Springs a 
favorite resort for people seeking health and. recreation. 

Reached in 24 hours from New York in through Pullman drawing-room sleeping cars, via Southern 
Railway. l * ' ' ! : **& ' 

FOR FULL PARTICULARS CALL OR ADDRESS 

New York Offices: 271 and 1185 Broadway 

ALEX. S. THWEATT, Eastern Passenger Agent, 1185 Broadway, N. Y. 
W. A.Turk, Pass. Traffic Mgr., Washington, D. C. S. H. Hardwick, Gen'l Pass. Aft. .Washington, D. C. 



\ 



RECREATION. 




The way to get the best accommodations is via the 

Great Rock Island Route 

WHY ? It is the only direct line to Colorado Springs and Manitou. 
It is the popular route to Denver. It has the best Dining Car Service. 
It has the finest equipment and most satisfactory schedule and in the 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIMITED 

offers the best train; only one night, Chicago to Colorado. It leaves Chicago daily at 5Ao p. m. 
and arrives at Denver at 8.45 p. m., Colorado Springs (Manitou) 8.30 p. m. 

Another inducement to use the Rack Island will be the low round trip rates of 
$25 frcm Chicago to Colorado and $| 5 from Missouri River Points to Colorado, effective this 
summer by that line. Ask for details and free books. 

* 'Under the Turquoise Sky" gives the breeziest and most fascinating description of 
Colorado. "Camping in Colorado" has full details for campers. Anglers will want "Fishing 
in Colorado." 

JOHN SEBASTIAN, General Passenger Agent, CHICAGO. 



VI 



RECREATION. 



~7F- <— 



4 




iooo Island Rouse 



In the midst of the "Thousand Islands," 
the so-called "Venice of America/' and 
really the most charming and delight- 
ful Summer Resort on the Continent. 

Send us two 2-cent stamps and we will mail you a 
beautifully illustrated guide book. Mention Recreation. 



O. G. STAPLES, 
G. DeWITT, 



Owners and Proprietors 



Alexandria Bay, n. V. 



RECREATION. 



VH 




Tired of the city? 

Sick of the heat? 

Longing for the 

mountains ? 

For fresh air? 

For cold water ? 

For restful scenery ? 

Then try 

Ttie White mountains. 





AND COTTAGES, 

riAPLEWOOD, N. H., 

is one of the Host Restful 

and Delightful Summer 

Homes in the World. 

Illustrated booklets giving full in- 
formation can be had at 

3 Park Place, New York City, 

147 Sumner Street, Boston, 

1711 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, 

or by writing the Managers, 

CILLEY & MURRAY, 

riAPLEWOOD, N. H. 

Mention Recreation 







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MAPLEWOOD PARK AND P"SIDENT'AL RANGE FROM EAST PIAZZA HOTEL 




" Thy happy clime is free, 
And plenty knows, 
And days ot halcyon rest." 



Halcyon Hall 

And Cottages 

MILLBROOK, DUTCHESS COUNTY, N.Y. 
Season : May 2 1st to Nov. 9th 



ituated on a mountain peak, commanding 
wide and beautiful panoramic views oi the 
Highlands, Cat?kills and Berkshires. 
Water Supply, of unexcelled quality, from a 
Natural Spying. No Malaria. A o Mosquitoes. 

Two hours distant by rail from 1 he Grand 
Central Depot (via Dutchess Junction), and 
easily reached by travelers from Ihe West, the 
South, and New England. 

« House autcnobile, omni rus, or carriage, when 
notified, will meet gues's at Poughkeepsie, 15 
miles or Dover Plains (Hailem R. R.), 8 miles 
distant through enchanting country. 

Spacious and beautiftil grovnds, afferding 
an pie room for Outdoor Games and Pastimes 
of every sort. 

Superb roads for Driving, Bicycling or 
A utoniobiling. Livery and stabling facilities 
of the highest order 

Adjacent estates occupied- by New York mil- 
lionaires, whose Summer Homes in this region 
are a guarantee of its braciag healiL-ru^ness. 

An exclusive resort, never invaded by noisy 
crowds or excursionists. 

House Physician. Hot, cold and needle 
baths. 

Music by a first-class Orchestra. Concerts 
three times daily. A Dance every Saturday 
evening after an Entertainment by noted Artists. 
Telephone, Telegraph Operator, Stenogra- 
pher and Typewriter, in the House. Stock 
Exchange news and quotations by direct wire. 
Trap-Shooting, Billiards, Library, Golf, Tennis, 
Ping-Pong. Boating and fishing nearby. 

A new drive for evety day in the year. Roads 
as good as those of Central Park. "The scenery 
about Millbrook recalls the softness rf Devonshire 
and Surrev landscapes, while the horizon is out- 
lined by billowy mountains and serrated peaks." 
— Illustrated London News. 
Illustrated booklet sent on application. 



HEJVRy F. GILLIG SSL CO.. Proprietors. 



Vlll 



RECREATION. 



Campers' Outfits 

Do You Know 

ABERCROMBIE & FITCH 

2 & 3 SOUTH ST., NEW YORK CITY 




Everything to Hake the Camper Comfortable and Happy 

We can advise you where and how to go. We are practical campers and have person- 
We have had twenty years' experience in ally tested all our goods. 

camping out. We guarantee everything we make to be the 
We can furnish you with complete outfits. very best procurable. 

We Manufacture CAMP furniture, tents, sleeping bags, 

f^-z^^ ~— ; ■ " PACKS and PACK HARNESS, CLOTHING and PRO- 
VISION BAGS, TUMPLINES, PNEUMATIC BEDS 
and CUHSIONS, CANVAS FOLDING BUCKETS and WASH BASINS, FOLD- 
ING STOVES, ALUMINUM LANTERNS, BAKERS, STOVES, CLOTHING, 
MOCCASINS, ALUMINUM COOKING OUTFITS and Everything Else Used 
by the Camper. 

Write for Catalogue "R." 



ABERCROMBIE & FIECH. 



2 & 3 SOUTH 
STREET 



New York City 



RECREATION, 



IX 




Twentieth Century 

Electro-Vapor 

Launches 

ARE ideal gentlemen's launches, free from complications and care, and should appeal 
to the angler, the hunter, and every lover ot nature, as they are designed with a 
view of supplying more genuine, healthful pleasure to the square inch than any- 
thing we know of. They are elegant to look at — a pleasure to ride in — easy to manage — 
safe and reliable. There is no heat, no smoke, no fire, no engineer or pilot, no govern- 
ment license required, no offensive odor, no noisy exhaust; under way in ten seconds. 
The most simple, economical, powerful and effective outfit ever offered. There are three 
thousand of these launches in use, and we ship them to all parts of the globe. They 
were used exclusively at the Pan-American and Omaha Expositions, where they carried 
thousands of delighted people. Why ? Because they were the best. A launch as shown 
above is 16 ft. long, and can be operated in 8 inches of water, enabling the angler and 
the hunter to invade the feeding grounds with ease. 

We build a 15 ft. Fishing Launch for $150 
• « ♦< " 16 «« Family •« " 200 

«« «« ■« 35 '« Cabin " «« 1500 

Also a complete line of Steam and Sail Yachts — Row Boats — Hunting Boats — Canoes. 
Our 80-page catalog tells the truth about the best boats built, and it is yours for the 
asking. Send to-day and avoid the Spring rush. Address 



Racine Boat Mfg. Co. 

Riverside, Racine, Wis. 



X 



RECREATION. 



SUMMER VACATIONS IN COLORADO 

THE MISSOURI PACIFIC RAILWAY OFFERS INDUCEMENTS IN THE WAY OF 

LOW RATES AND SUPERB ACCOMMODATIONS TO THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. 

The World-Famed Eesorts of Colorado Are Ideal Places for Health and Recreation— Benefits of Camping 

Out— It Is Very Inexpensive— Interesting Information for the Tourist, Sportsman and Health Seeker. 



AT this season of the year when thou- 
sands of American Tourists go abroad 
to spend their summer vacations in 
crowded European cities, the question 
naturally arises, why do they do it, when 
there are so many attractions on this side of 
the Atlantic ? They return and rave over 
the Alps and Apennines and have never 
seen the "Rockies" of their own country. 



Summer resorts are numerous and hotel 
and boarding house accommodations may 
be obtained at most reasonable prices. 

The Missouri Pacific Railway with its 
connecting lines the Denver and Rio Grande 
Railroad and the Rio Grande Western Rail- 
way will offer very low rates to all points in 
Colorado during the entire summer. It is the 
most direct route from the South and East 




GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLORADO. 



The mountains of Colorado are as pictur- 
esque, grand and sublime as those of Switz- 
erland. They rear their heights of never- 
trodden snow, the same as the Jungfrau, 
and their hidden beauties have never been 
portrayed by pen, pencil or brush. 

In the light of modern transportation 
facilities they lie at the threshold of every 
health and pleasure seeker's door. Amid 
the heat, turmoil and bustle of daily life 
they expand into the infinite and extend a 
cordial welcome to recreation, repose and 
rest. To live among them during the sum- 
mer months is to dwell in -a land of per- 
petual sunshine — almost midway between 
earth and heaven. There are clouds and 
showers at times, it is true, but just enough 
to make a glorious sunset. 

In that great tract along the eastern foot- 
hills in which lie Denver, Colorado Springs, 
Manitou, Pueblo,Trinidad, Golden, Boulder, 
Fort Collins and Greeley the sun shines 
sixty-two hours in every hundred in which 
it is above the horizon. 



via the Pueblo gateway to the famous re- 
sorts of the Rocky Mountains. It has a 
double daily service of fast trains from St. 
Louis and Kansas City with equipment un- 
surpassed by that of any other railroad in 
the West. A vacation spent at the seaside 
or eastern mountain resorts can not be com- 
pared for a moment with the bracing and 
invigorating effects derived from the free- 
dom of outdoor life in Colorado. The sum- 
mer climate is simply delightful, the atmos- 
phere being crisp and cool during the day 
and inviting to peaceful repose at night. 
There are no flies or mosquitoes in the higher 
altitudes. Even the cloudy days do not pre- 
clude an outdoor life. They are not accom- 
panied with the penetrating dampness or 
rawness of the Eastern or Middle States. 
A camping season in the mountains of Col- 
orado is one of the greatest inducements 
that can be offered to thousands of men and 
women who are looking forward to and ar- 
ranging for the summer vacation, which is 
to give a respite and relief from the toil and 



RECREATION. 



XI 



turmoil of daily business and domestic 
cares. Camp life in the Rocky Mountains 
means days of rare sport and pleasure, fol- 
lowed by nights of delicious repose— it 
means revelry in the warm sunshine every 
day with cool and sequestered nooks always 
near at hand. 




ON THE BANKS OF THE RIO GRANDE, COLORADO. 



Camping is not expensive. As a matter 
of fact it has been demonstrated by 
experience that a summer vacation spent 



much less expensive 
large city, at the sea- 



ani Kansas City carry through Pullman 
Wide Vestibuled Drawing Room Sleeping 
Cars and Reclining Chair Cars (seats free) 
to Colorado, Utah and Pacific Coast 
points. Observation, Parlor, Cafe Dining 
Cars in which meals are served at. all 
hours, a la carte, are also operated on these 
trains between St. Louis 
and Kansas City and 
Kansas City and Pueblo. 
A similar service is given 
on the Denver & Rio 
Grande and Rio Grande 
Western Railways. The 
Sleepingand Dining Cars 
have electric lights and 
fans. Further informa- 
tion and details in the 
shape of descriptive and 
illustrated literature on 
Colorado and camping in 
the Rocky Mountains will 
be furnished gratuitously 
by .any Representative 
of the above lines or by 
H. C.Townsend, General 
Passenger and Ticket 
Agent of the Missouri 
Pacific Railway, on ap- 
plication or by mail at 
headquarters in the Equi- 
table Building, St. Louis, 
During the months of June.July, Au- 
and September, the Missouri Pacific 
sell round trip tourist tickets 



in this manner is 
than one spent in a 
side or the average 
summer resort. 
Eliminating the 
cost of many ar- 
ticles which camp- 
ers already own 
and which natur- 
ally they would 
take with them 
and those articles 
which may be 
made at the camp 
grounds and add- 
ing the fact that 
fish and game will 
form a good part 
of the food supply, 
the expense of a 
trip in the moun- 
tains will be found 
to be very low. 
During July, Au- 
gust and September anyone enjoying rea- 
sonable health may camp safely under can- 
vas in almost any part of Colorado. It is then 
a question of accessibility in the selection of a 
camping place. Camping outfits for two, four 
or six persons may be bought or rented from 
supply houses in Pueblo, Denver, Colorado 
Springs or other prominent points at very 
reasonable prices. The expense of camping 
will decrease with the size of the party, the 
per capita rate growing proportionately less. 
The Missouri Pacific trains from St. Louis 



Mo. 

gust 

Railway will 

to all points in Colorado at greatly reduced 

rates. To illustrate, the round trip from St. 




COLORADO SPRINGS. 

Louis to Denver, Colorado Springs or Pueblo 
will be only $21.00; from Kansas City, 
$15.00; from Atchison or St. Joseph, Mo., 
$15.00; from Joplin, Mo., $16.80; from Hot 
Springs, Ark., $26.10; from Memphis, Little 
Rock and Texarkana, $25.00. These tickets 
will be good to return until October 31st, 
1902, and every inducement is offered in the 
way of stop-over privileges and side trips to 
make a trip to Colorado and the Rocky 
Mountains an event to be recorded and 
never forgotten in the annals of one's life. 



Xll 



RECREATION. 



Black 


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are cavight in 
the Dela.wa.re 
RJver and in 
many of the 
beautiful lakes 
and streams 
along the 


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PICTURESQUE 


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State Wardens at the Long Point Hatcheries, Chautauqua Lake, "stripping" Muskallonge 
at the spawning season. 



The board on which the fish are nailed is 16 inches wide. The 
largest fish weighs 8 pounds 9 ounces, 

Send three cents in 
stamps for postage to 
D. W. Cooke, Gen'l 
PassV Agt. Erie R. R. 
21 Cortlandt St., New 
York, for M Fishing on 
the Pict\iresq\ie Erie/' 

Mention Recreation. 

Thou- 
sands of 
Mvskal- 
longelike 
this are 
still at 
large in 
Chautau- 
qva LaKe 



RECREATION. 



xm 



AMERICAN 

Food and Ga^me Fish 

By DAVID STAR.R. JORJ)AN and BAR.TON W. EVER.MANN 




Otter 
525 exits 



IN 



10 
COLOR. 



108 
LIFE 



FROM 
PHOTOS 



IMPORTANT POINTS FOR THE ANOIiER 

1. Dr. Jordan, President of Leland Stanford University, and Dr. Evermann, of 
the United States Fish Commission, have fished in every State and Territory of the 
Union, as well as in Canada, Alaska and tropical rivers and seas. 

2. They combine an exact scientific knowledge with an en- 
thusiastic love of angling ; thus the book is not only scientific, 
but popular and sportsmanlike. 

3. There are 1,000 species of fish described. 

4. The illustrations are remarkable, over 100 species having 
been photographed from life, in the water, by A. R. Dugmore — 
the first successful photos of live fish ever secured. There are 
also 10 superb lithographed color plates and over 200 text cuts. 

5. The identification of any fish is made extremely easy. 

6. The book tells of the 'habits of the fish, and indicates the 
localities, the seasons, and the methods best adapted for success- 
ful angling. 

7. Extraneous matter is introduced — verses, authenticated stories of unusual 
phenomena, and anything which may be of interest to the reader. 

8. The book is of royal octavo size, containing 545 pages and over 325 illustrations, 
and sells for $4.00, special net. (By mail $4 36). 

Uhis is the eighth in our ffebu Nature Library, the other -Volumes being Nature's 
Garden (Wild Flotvers) ; "Bird Neighbors ; Game "Birds; The Insect BooKi The 
Mushroom BooK.; Bird Homes; The Butterfly BooK.- 'COe bax)e printed 91.000 
of these bocks to date. 

Cut out this coupon and maii to us for our full-page circular giving 
full particulars, with reproductions of some of the cuts. 



208 
TEXT CUTS 




, Page & Co. 



34 Union Sq., East 

NEW YOUK CITY 



Double&ay, Page & Co.: 

Kindly send me full particulars of American Food 
and Game Fishes. 



Name . . 

'Address, 

Rec. 7-02 



XIV 



RECREATION. 



"FOR 34 YEARS A STANDARD PIANO." 

The Wing Piano 



YOU NEED THIS BOOK 



I 



IF YOU INTEND TO BUY A PIANO. A book 
— not a catalogue — that gives you all the informa- 
tion possessed by experts. It makes the selection of a piano easy. If read carefully, it will make you 
a judge of tone, action, workmanship, and finish; will tell you how to know good from bad. It de- 
scribes the materials used ; gives pictures of all the different parts, and tells how they should be made 
and put together. It is the only book of its kind ever published. It contains 116 large pages, and is 
named ''The Book of Complete Information About Pianos." We send it free to anyone wishing 
to buy a piano. Write for it. 

C A \TZ2 "CDfMtTT <tffifl T*^> ^OHf! We make the WING PIANO and sell it our- 
0/\.Vl2i Fl\.wl.Vl J)IUU 1 \J 4>ZUU selves. It goes direct from our factory to 
your home. We do not employ any agents or salesmen. When you buy the WING PIANO you pay 
the actual cost of construction and our small wholesale profit. This profit is small because we sell 
thousands of pianos yearly. Most retail stores sell no more than twelve to twenty pianos yearly, and 
must charge from $100 to $200 profit on each.. They can't help it, 




A Wing style — 45 other styles to select from. 

QEMT r\\\ TTDTAT WE PAY FREIGHT. NO MONEY IN ADVANCE. We will 
OrLIN 1 \J1M I JXlrV.1^ S end any WING PIANO to any part of the United States on 
trial. We pay freight in advance and do not ask for any advance payment or deposit. If the piano is 
not satisfactory after twenty days' trial in your home, we take it back entirely at our expense. You pay 
us nothing unless you keep the piano. There is absolutely no risk or expense to you. 

Old instruments taken in exchange. EASY MONTHLY PAYHENTS. 

INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT '$E^&g£& %%«§ 

the tones of the mandolin, guitar, harp, zither and banjo. 

IN 34 YEARS 33,000 PIANOS 



We refer to over 33,000 satisfied purchasers 

in every part of the United States. WING 

PIANOS are guaranteed .for twelve years against any defect in tone, action, workmanship, or material. 



Are just as carefully made as Wing Pianos. They have a sweet, 
powerful, lasting tone, easy action, very handsome appearance, need 
Wing Organs are sold direct from the factory, sent on trial ; are sold on easy monthly 
payments. For catalogue and prices write to 



WING ORGANS 

no tuning. 



WING & SON, 



1868- 



226 and 228 East 12th St., 
NEW YORK. 
34th Year— J902. 



RECREATION 



xv 



TWO DOLLARS 

FOR A NAME 



We want your dealers' 
name ( Stationer, Jeweler or 
Druggist ).and as an induce- 
ment for you to send it to 
fowuJ us, we wiil send postpaid, 
*»E™t your choice of these popular 
styles 

LAUGHLIN FOUNTAIN PEN 

Superior to the $3.00 grades 
of other makes, for the name, 
and only 



THE 






By registei ed mail 8c extra. 

If you do not find the pen 

[as represented, and superior 

in every respect to any pen 

! you ever used, return it and 

1 get your $1 back, as the pen is 

SENT ON APPROVAL 

To Responsible People. 

It Costs you Nothing 

to try it a week. Safety 
Pocket Pen Holder sent with 
each pen 

FREE OF CHARGE 

This pen will make a gift 
of never ending usefulness 
and a constant pleasant re- 
minder of the giver. 

Do not miss this oppor- 
tunity to secure a $3 value at 
a price that is only a frac- 
tion of its real worth. Finest 
grade 14 Karat Gold Pen, 
and guaranteed. Everybody 
knows that in Fountain Pens 
the , 

LAUGHLIN 

has no equal and is always 
sold under the express con- 
ditions that if not entirely 
satisfactory, your money re- 
funded. 



Address 

LAUGHLIN MFG. CO. 

424 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 



EQUITABLE 



J.W.ALEXANDER 

PRESIDENT 




J.H.HYDE 

VICE PRESIDENT 



FIRE AND 
LIFE 

assurance are two 
very different things. A Fire 
policy may mature. A Life* 
policy must mature if kept 
in force. Both furnish pro- 
tection, but a Life policy on 
the Endowment plan furnish 
es an investment, as well 
as protection. 

Here is the result in 
1902 of Endowment policy 
No 241,049, for $5,000, 
taken out twenty years ago: 

Cash- - $7523.45 

This is a return of all 

premiums paid, and $2,574. 
45 in addition. 

Send this coupon for particulars 



THE EQUITABLE SOCIETY, 

Dept. No. ib 120 Broadway, New York 

Please send me information regarding an 

Endowment for $ .if issued to 

a man years of age. 

Name 

Address 



RECREATION 



Direct from our distillery to YOU 

Saves dealers' profits, 
Prevents Adulteration. 

HAYNER 
WHISKEY 

PURE SEVEN YEAR OLD RYE 



4 FULL QUARTS $9.20 
EXPRESS CHARGES PAID RY US. ^f , 



OUR OFFER 



We will send you by prepaid express, FOUR FULL QUARTS 
of HAYNER'S SEVEN-YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20. If you don't 
like it after trying it, send it back at our expense and 
your $3.20 will be promptly refunded. Gould any offer be fairer? Bear in mind that 
any statement or offer we make is backed by a company with a capital of $500,000.00, 
paid in full, and the proud reputation of 36 years of continuous success. We are 
regularly supplying over a quarter of a million satisfied customers, convincing evidence 
that our whiskey pleases. Won't you let us send you a trial order? Your money back 
if not satisfied. Shipment made in a plain sealed case: no marks to indicate contents. 




BAYNEtfl 

SEVEN YEAR OLD 




l 6 H«fNERT||snili*l 

^PlSTILLERSjT I 

Nitrate 



If you have the impression that HAYNER is inferior whiskey simply be- 
cause it's so cheap, you were never more mistaken. No matter how much you 
pay you cannot get purer or better whiskey than HAYNER and we will tell you 
why. We are distillers and make at our own distillery — Hayner's Registered 
Distillery No. 2, Tenth District, Ohio, — under the supervision of the United States Gov- 
ernment, every gallon of whiskey we sell, and our entire product is sold direct 
to consumers. Our whiskey does not pass through the hands of any rectifier or 
wholesale or retail dealer; so when you buy HAYNER you get it direct from 
our distillery at the distiller's price, are assured of its perfect purity, and save 
the big profits of the dealers. If we sold our whiskey to dealers they would 
charge at least double our price and then you wouldn't be sure of its purity. 
"Uncle Sam" absolutely controls the distilleries and will positively not allow any 
adulteration, but when whiskey once leaves the distiller's hands, the dealer can 
much as he likes. Therefore, when you buy HAYNER WHISKEY you have not only our assurance but 
also the guarantee of the United States Government that it is pure and unadulterated: If you want pure 
whiskey at first cost, buy HAYNER. You cannot get better whiskey at any price. 

WRITE OUR NEAREST OFFICE. 

EST i866 SHED THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 

DAYTON, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO. o ST. PAUL, MINN. 




'doctor" it as 



DISTILLERY, 
TROY, 0. 



Orders for Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, 
Utah, Washington and Wyoming must be for 20 Quarts for $16.00 by FREIGHT PREPAID. 








MP "* 



STANDING ON AN OLD PINE LOG, ONE FOOT IN THE TRAP, HE GLARED AT ME. 



RECREATION 



Volume XVII. 



JULY, 1902. 
G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager 



Number J. 



TRAPPING A MOUNTAIN LION. 



CHAS. A. FRIEDEL. 



In Southern Colorado, a branch of 
the Purgatory river known as the 
North Fork Uas its source high up in 
the Sangre De Christa range of moun- 
tains. Along this stream and several 
of its small branches, I was prospect- 
ing for gold. 

One day, as I was returning down 
the mountain to my camp, 3 deer sud- 
denly sprang from out the brush, 
dashed across the path in front of me, 
and bounded up the side of the moun- 
tain. For a second or so I was at a 
loss what to do, and could but stand 
and admire their graceful movements. 
After going 200 yards they separated, 
the doe and the fawn going to the 
right, while the other, a large buck, 
came to a stand beyond a boulder, 
with only his head visible above its top. 

Though not in urgent need of veni- 
son, the temptation to see if I could hit 
the buck's head at that distance was so 
great I could not resist it. I raised 
my rifle, made a slight allowance for 
the drop of the bullet, and pressed 
the trigger with a "don't care if I do 
miss" sort of a pull. The bullet en- 
tered the deer's head below the ear, 
killing him almost instantly. 

The rock was 10 feet across at the 
base and about 5 feet high, with a 
flat top. The side on which the deer 
lay was sloping, and the sun being al- 
most down, I thought I could do no 
better than to draw the deer up on 
the rock and leave him there until 
morning. That, with some difficulty, 
I did; then, rapidly descending, I 
soon reached the trail at the bottom of 
the canyon and in about an hour ar- 
rived at camp. 



Early the next morning I was up, 
and after a hearty breakfast I buckled 
the pack saddle on one of my best 
burros and returned to the rock to get 
my deer. Arriving there, I found 
someone had been before me and had 
carried, or rather dragged, him away. 
The thief had been unable to shoulder 
the carcass, and a broad trail lay be- 
fore me, down the mountain. This I 
followed, but found nothing by which 
I could identify the robber until I 
came near the creek. He had pulled 
the deer while walking backward, 
and in that way had covered his own 
tracks. Near the creek, however, he 
had met an obstacle in the shape of a 
fallen pine. There, it appeared, he 
had a great deal of trouble, and in his 
efforts to get the deer over the log he 
had left his own footprints. The 
thief was a large mountain lion. 

The creek being but a few yards 
away, I began to be on my guard. I 
was certain he had not been able to 
draw the carcass across the stream. 
Pushing through the thick under- 
brush and aspen trees that lined the 
stream, I came on the remains of 
my deer. The lion 'had feasted to his 
heart's content. After devouring all 
of one hind quarter, and part of the 
back, he had covered the remainder 
with some sticks and leaves. Being 
well acquainted with the habits of the 
beast, I was sure he would return to 
renew his repast. I therefore made 
preparations for his capture. 

After removing the hide, I cut up 
the best portion of what meat was left 
and tied it up in the skin. Then, 
making a hole in one of the deer's 



4 



RECREATION. 



ears, I passed a piece of buckskin 
through it and hung the head on a 
limb of a sapling. Some 2 miles 
above my camp, on Whisky creek, 
was a bear trail, and near that trail a 
large steel bear trap, 42 pounds in 
weight, had been set 2 or 3 nights 
previously for a large cinnamon bear. 
He had, however, failed to accept the 
invitation. 

I took this trap up and carried it to 
the place where the lion had had his 
royal feast the night before. Remov- 
ing the deer's head from the limb, I 
fastened it securely to the butt of a 
small aspen tree. Then I cut down 
a tree from which I made a clog 
about 8 feet long and 6 inches 
in diameter at the large end. I put 
the ring of the trap chain on this clog 
and fastened it with a wedge. Then 
I dug up the earth near the deer head 
until I had a hole about 4 inches deep 
and about the size and shape of the 
trap. In that hole I placed the big 
trap, after setting it, and covered it 
with earth and leaves. 

I was up and on my way to the trap 
early the next morning. The shad- 
ows cast by those lofty mountains 
among which my camp was placed 
had not as yet been dispelled by the 
rising sun, although higher up, on the 
Sangre De Christa range, vast piles 
of snow were glistening in his 
rays. As I neared the place where 



the trap was set, I became anx- 
ious to see what my luck had been. 
After I had penetrated the thick un- 
dergrowth, to within 50 feet of the 
spot, I found I had made a capture. 
The aspen trees near where the trap 
had been set had the bark torn off. 
The marks of teeth and claws on oth- 
er trees and the trampled earth bore 
evidence there had been a fierce bat- 
tle between the beast and the big trap. 

Stealing softly forward, I soon dis- 
covered the lion. Standing on an old 
pine log, one foot in the great trap, he 
glared at me, silent and grim. He 
made no motion except with his tail, 
which he lashed furiously. His head 
was in a line with his body as he 
stood directly facing me. Not wish- 
ing to make any bullet holes in his 
skin, I moved forward and began to 
circle around him. He made no ef- 
fort to change the position of his 
body, but followed me with his in- 
tense gaze until I had made almost 
a half circle. His head then being 
out of line with his body, my chance 
to fire had come. This I did with 
careful aim, just above and between 
those glowing eyes. 

As the report of the rifle rang 
through the canyon, the head of the 
beast sank down and his body fell 
sideways off the log. Reloading my 
rifle, I stepped quickly forward, but 
life was extinct before I reached him. 



He was in the parlor of a St. Louis 
residence while his fiancee was playing 
a Chopin sonata on the piano. Her 
mother was seated almost opposite her 
future son-in-law, and when the proper 
opportunity presented itself she said: 

"Don't you think Edna has a great 
ear for music?" 

"I certainly do," replied the young 
man. "If you'd stretch a few strings 
across it it would make a lovely guitar " — 

But he never finished his sentence. — 
N. Y. Herald. 



WILD GOAT SHOOTING ON THE DESERTAS. 



LAURENCE MOTT. 



The yacht was lying off the town of 
Funchal, Madeira. We were only to stay 
2 days, as we were homeward bound and in 
a hurry to get to New York; but as I had 
received a tempting invitation from the 
owner of the Desertas islands, which lie 
20 miles to the Westward from Funchal, to 
shoot over them, I decided to take the 2 
days and go over to the islands after wild 
goats. Leaving the yacht one morning at 1 
o'clock, i - the cutter, we sailed across and 
reached our destination at 7 o'clock. I say 
we because I took 2 sailors with me, be- 
sides a Portuguese, whom the owner of the 
islands recommended as a good guide. 
We tumbled our stuff ashore and while the 
men got a fire going for breakfast I took 
the glasses and climbed up 100 feet or so 
on the cliffs to get a look about. It was 
the most desolate sight I ever saw ; no 
vegetation of any kind, except here and 
there a few patches of moss. Nothing but 
rocks and cliffs towering some 2,000 feet 
from the water's edge. I could see no pos- 
sible chance of getting to the top, as the 
cliffs seemed perpendicular everywhere. 

After breakfast we made everything fast 
in case there should be a blow while we 
were gone, and started. I had never done 
any high climbing, and the altitudes both- 
ered me. In some places we edged along 
goat paths not 4 feet wide with the cliff on 
one side and a sheer drop of 1,000 or 1,500 
feet on the other. Two or 3 times on the 
way up we saw goats, but they either were 
too far off to attempt even stalking, or they 
saw us just about the time we saw them, 
and disappeared. It took us 2^2 hours to 
reach the top, and I was nearly exhausted 
when we got there. 

"Francisco," I said, "where are the 
goats?" 

"Find some plent' quick now," the guide 
answered ; so we trudged on, sneaking 
from rock to rock and crawling on our 
hands and knees whenever we came to a 
turn in the oath, lest there should be goats 
on the other side. The native method of 
hunting is primitive and tiresome. They 
creep along for hours sometimes, and when 
they see a ?oat they hide themselves com- 
fortably, trusting to luck that the animal 
will come toward them. The goats are 
very wild and "light out" at the slightest 
movement or noise on the part of the hun- 
ter. 

We had been dragging ourselves slowly 
along for an hour when the guide, who was 
ahead, suddenly dropped flat. I quickly 
followed his example and awaited further 



developments. In a few moments he mo- 
tioned to me carefully, and I wriggled 
along the ledge till I got to him. Follow- 
ing the direction of his eyes I saw on the 
edge of a cliff, some 250 yards away and 
fairly well above us, 4 goats. With the 
glasses I could see that one of them was 
a large buck with a fine pair of horns. 
They were nibbling some bits of moss and 
had not discovered us. I got my Win- 
chester 30-40 carefully in position and 
waited for a favorable opportunity. At 
last the "bigga one," as Francisco called 
him, stepped to the edge of the cliff, as 
though trying to get a better view of our 
position. I thought that my best chance 
and let him have it, taking sight at his 
shoulder as nearly as I could make it. 
When I fired the buck jumped forward and 
fell clear of the ledge. Down he went, 
turning over and over in the air. 

"Buono, buono!" ejaculated the guide; 
"me get." 

Before I could say a word he was 
over the edge of the path we were ly- 
ing on and was going down the cliff at a 
break-neck pace. I thought surely he 
would kill himself, as one misstep would 
have plunged him about 1,600 feet into 
the water ; but in another hour I heard a 
faint shout, and looking over the edge I 
saw him standing by the body of the goat. 

While I waited for him to get back I 
took the glasses, and leaving my rifle on 
the ledge I climbed up to a pinnacle about 
150 feet above me. From there I com- 
manded a much more extensive view, and 
to my delight I discovered a bunch of 6 
goats around in the next chasm but one. 
They were evidently out of hearing of the 
shot, as they were all lying down in the 
warm sunlight. I hurriedly scrambled back 
to the ledge where I had left my rifle, and 
leaving my pipe and tobacco pouch there to 
show Francisco I would be back, I started. 
It was nervous work, all alone, but in 2 
hours I was within 300 yards of the bunch. 
I could get no nearer, as there was no way 
but a narrow ledge and that was in full 
sight of the goats. For half an hour I 
waited, hoping they would move up to the 
ledge where I could get a shot. Finally 
they got up hurriedly and started along the 
path they were on. but away from me, so 
I fired at the largest buck and missed. 
The bullet struck close, and the brute 
must have heard it whistle, as it covered 
him with sand and dirt. They all disap- 
peared like a flash, and I was cursing my 
poor marksmanship when something mov- 



RECREATION. 



ing caught my eye below me, and there 
were the whole 6 going like the mischief 
along a path about 150 yards away. They 
must have got down out of mv sight and 
then started back again on that trail. 

I threw up my rifle and holding a trifle 
ahead of the buck which was in the lead, 
I let him have it. He stumbled, fell and 
began kicking vigorously. The rest of the 
animals hesitated a moment then jumped 
over their fallen leader and went on 
with redoubled speed. I got down to 
the wounded goat just in time to prevent 
his kicking himself over the ledge. Getting 
my hunting knife in his throat was quite a 
job, as the ledge was not wide and I did 
not fancy going down the great height into 
the sea. I got a rock as big as I could 
lift and managed to throw it on the goat, 
which kept him quiet long enough for me 
to finish him. Cutting off the head and 
the skin well down on the shoulders, for 
mounting purposes, I tied it on my back 
by some handkerchiefs, and began my re- 
turn trip. 

Francisco was calmly smoking my pipe 
when I got back to him and to my sur- 



prise there was the whole body of a goat 
at his feet. 

"Ha ! Ha !" he said, "you gooda one ! 
Get all 'lone ! buono, buono !" 

We compared the 2 heads and found 
that the last one I had shot was a trifle the 
larger. These goats are not very large, 
weighing possibly 50 to 70 pounds. They 
are dark in color, have heavy, long hair 
and excellent horns, being somewhat 
like the chamois in shape, but much heavier 
and longer. 

It was getting late and it was as cold as 
winter up on the plateau, so we fastened 
on our game and began the trip to camp. 
We got there in 2 hours and after supper 
turned in. Our beds consisted of 2 thick- 
nesses of blanket between the rock and 
our bodies and the same quantity over us, 
but it felt like down to me. I never knew 
anything more comfortable. 

The next morning at 6 o'clock we loaded 
the cutter and set sail for Funchal. It 
was blowing hard, but as the wind was 
well abaft the beam the seas did not bother 
us much. When we got about half way 
across we saw the yacht coming out to pick 
us up, which she did in a short time. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY CLINTON A, SMITH. 



OWLETS. 
Winner- of 36th Prize in Recreation's 6th Annual Photo Competition. 



ON THE NEZ PERCES TRAIL. 



WESTLEY JONES. 
Photos by the Author. 



An article recently published in Recrea- 
tion, "Hunting for a Place to Hunt," by 
H. H. Todd, in which the author relates 
some of the experiences of himself and 
party in Central Idaho in 1899, was par- 
ticularly interesting to me and has prompt- 
ed me to tell the story of a recent trip 
over the Nez Perces trail, in the expecta- 



ing to Adams camp and leading our sad- 
dle animals. We halted at White Bird to 
feed the horses and take our lunch, and 
were engaged in that pleasant task when 
the wind storm mentioned by Mr. Todd in 
his article swept over that section with 
the suddenness, swiftness and destructive 
power of a cyclone. The section is heav- 




PACK TRAIN. 



tion that it may be of interest and value 
to some of the many readers of Recrea- 
tion. 

Mr. Francis E. Young, of San Fran- 
cisco, and I, en route to Concord, Buffalo 
Hump, Idaho, to inspect some mining 
properties in which we are interested, met 
and made the acquaintance of Messrs. 
Todd and Moses soon after leaving Chi- 
cago, and made the railroad, steamer and 
stage journey with them to great and 
growing Grangeville, where we were all 
put up at the Jersey House, of which the 
genial George K. Reed is proprietor. Mr. 
Young and I started for the Hump, driv- 



ily timbered with pine, and the trees, large 
and small, were lashed, twisted, smashed 
and mowed down by the score. Like most 
sudden and violent atmospheric disturb- 
ances, this one was of short duration, and 
the weather soon became calm and clear 
again. Not so the Florence road, across 
which many trees had fallen which had to 
be cut out before we could proceed. Had 
we been on the road when the storm 
struck, instead of lunching at White Bird, 
we could scarcely have escaped destruction 
by the falling trees. 

We reached Adams camp that evening, 
and the next morning, well mounted, we 



8 



RECREATION. 



hit the Gospel Mountain trail to the Hump. 
The distance is a little less than 25 miles, 
and the greatest elevation about 8,000 feet. 
The trail? Well, many better mountain 
men than we had been over it, but it 
snowed all day, and that doubled the diffi- 
culties and halved the pleasures of the 
trip, as most of the magnificent views 
were shut out by the storm clouds. 

We reached Concord about 9 o'clock 
in the evening, having been on the trail 
somewhat more than 12 hours. When 
within a half mile of Concord, we nar- 
rowly escaped being blown from the trail 
into the canyon below by blasts which 
were fired almost in our faces. At that 
time our company was operating a pack 
train of about 25 head between Adams 
camp and Concord, and employing some 
40 men in the various operations of min- 
ing, building, developing town site, etc. 
Just previous to our arrival the first 
grave was opened on our property in Con- 
cord to receive the body of the unfortu- 
nate victim of a quarrel which terminated 
fatally. James P. Turner had passed the 
previous winter in Concord and reported 
18 feet of snow. The small log structure 
in the foreground of the accompanying 
picture was his only shelter and was the 
first house built at Buffalo Hump. 

So much has been written within the last 
few years in re Central Idaho, and espe- 
cially the Hump and adjacent country, 
touching on the vital points of physical 
and climatic conditions, mineral resources, 
development, etc., that little remains to be 
added until new history is made, and it is 
making fast at the present time. The 
railroad from Lewiston to Stites has cut 
off about 60 miles of the stage ride over 
Camas prairie to Grangeville, and a pass- 
able wagon road has succeeded the Gospel 
Mountain trail. Thunder mountain is now 
attracting much attention, and it is expect- 
ed that the tide of travel will soon set 
strongly that way. 

Finishing our business at Concord, we 
returned to Grangeville and thence back to 
Boston. I decided that in the following 
year I would approach the Hump from the 
"East, leave the railroad at a point in Mon- 
tana and travel West over the Nez Perces 
trail to Elk City. Arrangements were 
made accordingly, and Mondav, September 
3, I .left the cars at Monida, Montana. 
There I found James Blair, with whom I 
had previously made several similar trios, 
•and his 2 assistants, John Bray and Joe 
Kemp, ready for me. Blair's outfit, 22 head 
of horses, of which 14 were pack, 6 were 
saddle animals and 2 were young colts, was 
the handsomest and best I have ever seen. 
He raises, breaks and trains his animals 
himself. As a hunter, trailer or packer. 
Mr. Blair probably has no superior in his 



section of the country. He is efficient, 
fearless and tireless when on the trail. 
Our supplies, selected and shipped from 
Boston, were on hand, the packs were ac- 
curately weighed and prepared for the 
horses, and Wednesday morning, Sep- 
tember 5, with an outfit as complete and 
perfect as careful thought directed by the 
knowledge of long experience could as- 
semble, we started on our long journey of 
nearly 500 miles to Buffalo Hump. James 
Blair lead the way, and he was leading in 
his own bold, fearless way when we en- 
tered Elk City, Idaho, 24 days later. 

Our course was via Big Sheep Creek 
basin, Horse prairie, Bloody Dick creek, 
Big Hole, Moose creek, Trail creek, Ross 
Forks to Darby, thence via Nez Perces 
trail to Elk City. None of us had been 
over the ground before ; the trail was diffi- 
cult, even dangerous, and in places blind 
and impassable until with axes we cut our 
way through fallen timber. We were late 
in the season in starting and encountered 
snows and severe cold. Feed for the 
horses was scarce and on more than one 
occasion lacking, and horses will travel a 
long way after being turned loose, looking 
for feed. Water is to be found only at 
long intervals, and the camp at night 
must be timed to water and grass. Here 
is a mountain wilderness of pine, an ocean 
of tree tops nearly 150 miles in extent 
East and West, with little water, few, if 
any, mountain meadows, so common in 
other sections, and no game of account, 
large or small. We saw a solitary mule 
deer and half a dozen fool hens. Nothing 
else. We found none of the usual tracks 
or signs of game along the trail or about 
the watering and feeding places. We met 
two Flathead hunting parties whose camps 
looked rather lean. They were having 
poor success. 

The first day out from Monida, when 
near Lima, we narrowly escaped disaster. 
The road on which we were then traveling 
makes through a narrow defile with per- 
pendicular walls on either side. Ahead it 
narrows to a mere pass, through which 
comes a spur of the railroad. Half way 
between us and the pass a large drove of 
cattle were feeding, many of them stand- 
ing on the tracks. We were giving them 
all the room we could, when through the 
pass came a freight train, up grade, with 
ringing bell, screeching whistle and clouds 
of black smoke hanging low and blowing 
straight toward us. It is impossible to de- 
scribe just what followed, I was so busy 
with that part which particularly interest- 
ed me, namely, an endeavor to save my 
own neck. There was a flying wedge of 
bellowing cattle and a wild dash of stam- 
peded horses, snorting and bucking. The 
bell, the whistle, the rush of the animals, 



on run nilz percbs TRAIL 



the shouts of our men, the rumbling of the 
cars, the black smoke, and — it was over, 
with no one hurt, though slightly jarred. 

The second night out we camped at the 
North end of Big Sheep Creek basin, near 
the ranch of Joe Smith. One horse was 
picketed, 8 were hobbled, and the others 
were turned loose. Tn the morning all 
were gone except the one on the picket 
rope. Blair and Bray went after them on 
foot, without any preparation for a long 
tramp. We did not see them again until 
the night of the third day after, when they 
returned with 18 head. Two belonging to 



tracks of the horses ridden by the thieves 
and he trailed them to their corral. Hav- 
ing gathered some; local traditions, he be- 
lieves he knows who the men are, and I 
do not care to be present when he meets 
them. 

During 3 days of enforced idleness 1 
came to understand why sheep herders be- 
come so melancholy. There was one' 
bunch of 3,600 sheep about our camp, and 
the continual bleating and that undulating 
mass of waving wool drifting aimlessly 
about were maddening. The herder was 
an agreeable man. A compensating fea- 







A COSY CAMP. 



Joe Kemp were missing, and as Joe had 
recently sacrificed a $2,000 outfit in Alaska, 
he felt his loss keenly. Our animals were 
run off by horse thieves to a distance of 25 
miles from our camp, finally up a steep 
mountain side and down into a deep basin. 
The hobbles were not removed, and the 
legs of the animals were terribly mangled. 
They were a sorry sight when they got 
back to our camp. Worse than inhuman 
brutes were they who committed the out- 
rage on horses and men. Blair and Bray 
trailed the horses until they found and 
brought them back. Blair loves a good 
horse, and his wrath was dark hued and 
continuous. He was able to pick out the 



ture in our delay was the abundance of 
sage hens, there being almost as many hens 
as sheep in the basin. Bunches of 100 to 
200 could always be found in the wet bot- 
toms, and the young birds at that season 
are equal to grouse. In the meantime I 
bought a saddle horse of Joe Smith, "Bal- 
dy" by name, and by nature a reliable and 
sociable beast, sound and sure footed. 

Resuming our journey, events ran 
smoothly for a while. Our chief difficulty 
was with fences. We sometimes went 3 
to 5 miles out of our way to weather a 
fence, and generally there was someone 
present to see that we did go around in- 
stead of through it. On the 14th we 



IO 



RECREATION. 



camped at a ranch in Big Hole basin. We 
took turns during the night in fighting off 
a drove of hogs that were determined to 
feed out of our packs. 

Sunday, the 16th, we visited Big Hole 
battle ground. The thrilling story of that 
historic event is so well told by the editor 
of Recreation in his book that every 
reader should have a copy. Just previous 
to our arrival, a badger had dug into one 
of the graves on the point and a skull and 
bones lay exposed to view, thus rudely dis- 
turbed after more than 20 years' peaceful 
rest. Whether white or Indian we could 
not determine. The monument is much 
defaced. The badger and the vandal are 
on the same level of ignorance. The bad- 
ger follows his instinct to burrow. The 
vandal yields to a morbid desire to possess. 
The vandal has had an opportunity to 
learn and should know and do better. 

The next day, after leaving Big Hole, we 
had a startling experience. A bunch of 
several hundred sheep had become lost, 
and, seeing our horses from a distance, 
came tearing along after us like mad. 
Blair and I were leading the procession 
down a steep incline in a narrow part of 
the trail, when the bleating bunch struck 
our rear guard and stampeded the pack 
horses down on to us, pell mell. The con- 
ditions were favorable for trouble, but we 
succeeded in extricating our horses and 
selves from the plunging, kicking, biting 
bunch without accident, though the sheep 
followed us several miles and we had 
some difficulty in getting away from them. 

Tuesday, the 18th, we camped at the 
ranch of John Stella, just out of Darby. 
Stella has a good sporting bungalow. 
This season he took out the party of Mr. 
Charles P. Pettus, of St. Louis, over the 
Lost Horse trail. They captured deer, elk, 
goat and bear. 

On the 21st we were well into the moun- 
tains on the famous Nez Perces trail, from 
which we had been told we could kick the 
game as we went along. How difficult it 
is for one to say truly, "That was the hap- 
piest day" or "This is the sweetest mu- 
sic," or "She is the prettiest girl !" Gen- 
erally the last seems best. I can truly af- 
firm that at a given point after passing 
Castle mountain the scenery is the most 
beautiful in extent and grandeur, breadth 
and scope, ruggedness and magnificence 
that I have ever seen or ever hope to see, 
and my experience has been considerable. 
For an hour I continually repeated to my- 



self, so that my mind should be fully im- 
pressed by the fact, never after to waver, 
"This must be the grandest sight on 
earth." 

^ We camped that night near a small 
Flathead Indian outfit. They showed us 
where to find a small spring. During the 
evening we were overtaken by Messrs. 
Robb and Chillson, who were making a 
break to go through with us to the Little 
Salmon meadows. We found them good 
company, but they were a divided house; 
one in favor of pushing on and the other 
in favor of turning back before they were 
snowed in for the winter. They eventu- 
ally went with us as far as the Little Sal- 
mon. The meadows, like the game, were 
not to be seen. We rested in camp the 
23d. There had been a snowfall of sev- 
eral inches. The 24th we crossed Mc- 
Gruder mountain, one of the most difficult 
sections of the trail. We were profound- 
ly_ impressed by the details of the awful 
crime committed there when McGruder, 
his men and mules were cruelly murdered 
and their bodies thrown over the cliff. 

The afternoon of the 25th we were "la- 
boring heavily in a rough sea" ; that is to 
say, we had some doubts as to the trail. 
We camped that night on the summit of 
the Divide, altitude not less than 10,000 
feet. There was little feed or water, the 
cold was severe, a high wind was blowing 
and snow was falling. Had the storm 
continued, our fate would have been set- 
tled right there, but fortunately it cleared 
during the night. On the 27th Messrs. 
Robb and Chillson quit at Little Salmon. 
They had had enough and turned back. 
From Little Salmon to Elk City is about 
40 miles, and easily done in 2 days. An 
interesting feature of the trail is the mul- 
titude of inscriptions on the trees, gener- 
ally some tale of woe or hard luck story, 
coupled with advice to turn back. 

On the 28th we camped at the ranch of 
Buster Smith, Elk City. I drove 55 miles 
to the nearest railroad point, Kooskia. 
Blair and outfit went back over the trail, 
and narrowly escaped being snowed in for 
the winter. One horse perished, and on 
their last day in the mountains they en- 
countered a furious snow storm that near- 
ly overwhelmed them, but they finally 
succeeded in breaking through to Darby 
and thence back to Blair's ranch, in Cen- 
tennial valley, where I am sure you would 
be a welcome visitor. 



She — I understand veal has gone up. 

He — I guess that's right; I see the res- 
taurants have raised the price of chicken 
salad. — Yonkers Statesman. 



LOOKS LIKE RAIN. 



TIDD MURRAY. 



Low'ry sky an' Southern breeze, 
Sun he's hid ahind a cloud, 

Robins singin' in th' apple trees, 
Hoppei chirpin' sort o' loud. 

Guess I ain't so weather blind 
That I don't know th' token ; 

Reckon that thar Southern wind 
Shows th' drought is broken. 

Guess I can't get in th' hay 

'Coz its sure ter rain ; 
Better wait till another day 

When th' signs are not ez plain. 



Reckon I'll ?et out th' pole 
An' dig some worms an' hike 

Down ter th' old deep river hole 
That used ter hold the pike. 

What! th' sun a burnin' through? 

Blame it ! let her burn. 
An' th' sky a turnin' blue ! 

I don't care; let her turn! 

Might jest ez well be fishin' 

Ez ter be er pitchin' hay 
When all th' time yere wishin' 

That termorrow'd be a rainy day. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY R. C. W. LETT. 



A MORNING NIP. 
Winner of 28th Prize in Recreation's 6th Annual Photo Competition. 




A GOOD RETRIEVER. 
Winner of 30th Prize in Recreation's 6th Annual Photo Competition 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY J. E. STANLEY 




THINKING IT OVER. 

Winner of 37th Prize in Recreation's 6th Annual Photo Competition 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY DR. J, B. PARDOE. 



THE MYSTERY OF A BULLET. 



CHARLES W. SAWYER. 



One September day in 1895 John and I 
were starting for our vacation in Northern 
Vermont. As we walked through the city 
streets on our way to the train, we saw a 
sign in a gun store window, "The U. M. C. 
Company's new cartridge, 22 short smoke- 
less mushroom, just received." John had 
in his hand a fancy 22 caliber single shot 
rifle, and he bought a few hundred of these 
new cartridges. No suspicion of the trou- 
ble they would get us into shadowed our 
sunny spirits while the train bore us to the 
beautiful woods of the North. Forests and 
fields, hills and valleys, sunlit waters and 
shadowy crags passed in endless proces- 
sion, until, at last, far from the towns the 
conductor called "Staceyville.'' At this 
little railroad station the farmer we were 
to board with met us, and drove us a 3 
hours' rough-and-tumble, jouncing, jolting, 
bumping ride, up hill and down dale, 
through woods and past clearings to the 
'way-back farm that was to be our home. 
In this quiet, sweet smelling, old fashioned 
farm house, in the fields, pastures, and ram- 
bling orchards that made up the clearing, 
and in the border of the woods around the 
clearing, we were for a time content. There 
were ruffed grouse and squirrels for John 
to shoot with his rifle and new cartridges. 
There was a range sufficiently long, shel- 
tered, and well lighted, whereon I could 
play at tarsret shooting with my powerful 
hunting rifle. There were rest, recreation, 
rustic beauty, and every attraction to 
keep us at home, yet we soon became rest- 
less, and strayed farther and farther away. 

In going about the country we often 
stopped at the outlying farms, and became 
friendly with the inmates. They were a 
pleasant lot of people, always ready to 
stop work for a chance to gossip. There 
was one of the lot, Ezekiel Withington, on 
whom we did not at first call, because the 
farmer with whom we boarded was at law 
with him, and told us terrible tales about 
him. We found, however, that some of the 
other farmers spoke well of Withington, so 
one day we stopped at his house. We liked 
him very well. He treated us to cider, and 
showed us about his farm. He had a mag- 
nificent place, of some 1,500 acres, pictur- 
esque buildings, herds of cattle, and a big 
flock of sheep. We soon found that some 
of the best small game hunting in the 
country was to be had in his woods. He 
was interested in John's rifle, and examined 
it and the ammunition with much care. 
Then he brought out his grandfather's 
muzzle loading rifle, which was a remarka- 



bly fine weapon, and we had some Shoot- 
ing. We found the man and his woods so 
attractive that we spent considerable 
time there. One thing seemed odd to us. 
He let his cattle, with a bull in the herd, 
and his sheep, with several rams among 
them, roam at will about the country, al- 
though a town road ran through his farm. 
We asked him if it was not dangerous. He 
said the bull would not hurt anybody, as he 
was tame, and the sheep were all pets ; but 
we heard elsewhere that Withington had 
sometimes had his sheep shot. The coun- 
try was heavily forested, and in the fall 
and winter there were numerous camps of 
hunters and woodchoppers, so it was diffi- 
cult to fix the blame. The loss and an- 
noyance had become so great that With- 
ington and other farmers had succeeded in 
getting a law passed making the illegal 
killing of sheep punishable by both fine and 
imprisonment. In telling us about it Well- 
ington's eyes snapped and his manner was 
such that we could see it would go hard 
with an offender if Withington could catch 
him. 

Soon after this we were going along the 
road one morning, guns in hand, on our 
way to a shooting match at the village. 
John had his new rifle. As we came out 
of the woods we saw Withington's sheep, 
an immense flock, feeding on both sides of 
the road in the pasture. They scattered 
from us right and left. I can do a little 
something at imitating the calls of various 
animals, and we had considerable fun in 
mystifying the sheep with the plaintive 
bleat of a lamb in distress, that drew them 
toward us, and the deep bass of a watchful 
old ram, that sent them running off again. 
Suddenly there was a slight sound behind 
us. I had only time to turn my head part 
way round when something like a great 
dirty white streak struck John in the back. 
At the heavy thud my friend doubled back- 
ward like a bent bow, and was thrown for- 
ward bv the impact of the mass 10 or 12 
feet. He fell in a heap as if dead. At the 
same time his assailant, an old ram, with 
great curved horns, came down on his feet, 
lowered his head, and stood ready to 
charge again at the least sign of life. I 
laid down mv rifle and ran at him. He 
promptly wheeled and charged me. As his 
ponderous head almost struck me I leaped 
aside, put out one foot, and tripped him. 
He was up in an instant, but before he 
could get away I had him by the tail, then 
by one hind leg, then, after a struggle, by 
both hind legs. I tied them with a piece 



13 



H 



RECREATION. 



of cord, tipped him over, knelt with one 
knee on his head and the other on his 
body, and tied his front legs. 

John, meanwhile, had got up, and was 
limping along to get his rifle. The first 
thing he thought of, after the edge of the 
pain was off, was whether the rifle was in- 
jured. It was without a scratch, for it had 
fallen on soft grass. John was the sort of 
fellow who would not give in to pain. He 
said he was all right, but I could see he was 
hurt. However, after sitting down awhile 
he insisted that we go on to the shooting 
match. I unfastened the ram's front legs, 
and taking his hind legs, trundled him 
along, wheelbarrow fashion. We got to 
Withington's after a while, and I fastened 
the ram in the sheep pen. We called at the 
house to see Withington, but he was away. 
I told Mrs. Withington the facts in the 
case, and added that I was afraid my friend 
was hurt worse than his grit would let 
him acknowledge. I asked if we might 
have a horse and buggy and Mrs. Withing- 
ton consented. 

We found a motley crowd assembled at 
the range. There were boys with cheap 
rifles, and men of all ages, with arms of 
about every degree of poorness and excel- 
lence. In spite of John's grit he was un- 
able to walk without a bad limp, and this 
soon drew the query as to how he got hurt. 
His hurt did not affect his shooting, or 
his skill at making bull's-eyes, and the 
beauty of his rifle brought a crowd of 
lookers-on. They were greatly interested 
in the ammunition, for, although the bullet 
was small, and the powder of little bulk, it 
shot, in John's hands, better than their 
heavy charges. They championed him 
strongly in the matter of the ram, and 
were loud in their statements of what 
they would do if they had been in our 
place. 

"Why," said one old grandfather, "that 
Zeke Withington haint no right on airth to 
let his cattle 'n sheep run in the public road. 
You orter shot that ram right then an' 
there, an' he never could 'a touched ye fer 
it. What's more, you've got a case agin 
him fer heavy damages. You just sue him 
fer $5,000 an' larn him a lesson." 

"That's right," said half a dozen around 
us. The village lawyer edged his way up, 
and offered to take the case. 

"You've got a clear case, gentlemen, and 
if you want to trust it to me, I'll guarantee 
you good money out of it." 

We refused his offer, and John said he 
thought he should let the matter drop. 

When we got back with the horse and 
buggy Withinarton had returned. There 
was a snap in his eyes that told us he had 
received the news from his wife, and con- 
sidered that henceforth we were to meet 
as foes. John was as pleasant as usual. 



"I suppose you heard from your wife," 
he said, "that your ram assaulted us this 
morning, on the road?" 

"Yes," said Withington; "and I sup- 
pose you'll have Lawyer Gibbs, down to the 
village?" 

"No," said John, "I shall not sue." 
Withington looked as if he wondered what 
kind of trick John would play. 

"You and I have been good friends, 
Withington, and, as far as I am concerned, 
we shall remain so." 

Withington soon became like his for- 
mer self, and we left on the best of terms; 
yet, I had a suspicion that he thought there 
was a screw loose somewhere, and that he 
might yet get a rap when he was off his 
guard. The spirit of revenge was inbred 
in him, and in every one of the men there- 
about we had chanced to meet, and he 
found anything different hard to believe. 

The next to the last day of our vacation 
arrived, and we decided to go gunning. 
We went through a stretch of oak woods 
near the brow of a long hill above the pas- 
ture. We thought we ought to find some 
grey squirrels there, and perhaps a few 
ruffed grouse, but although we kept very 
quiet and exercised our utmost skill, we 
did not see or hear a thing larger than 
small birds. We did not even fire our 
rifles, and went home saying it was the 
poorest afternoon's hunting we had had. 

The next morning we went over to bid 
goodbye to our neighbor to the South. The 
first thing he said to us was, 

"Well, boys, that was big game you got 
yesterday," and he gave us a wink. We 
thought it was his joke on our not getting 
any game, and wondered how he knew. 

"Yes," said I, "so big we could not get 
it home." 

"How'd ye shoot it," he asked. "Acci- 
dental ?" and he winked again and 
grinned. 

"Shoot what?" said John. 

"Why, Zeke's sheep. Haint ye heerd 
about it ?" with a broader grin. 

"No," said I, "we not only have not 
heard about it, but we didn't shoot it." 

"O, go 'way ! You needn't be afraid of 
me." 

"Tell us about it," said John. 

"Why," said the farmer, "last night about 
sundown, when the sheep come home to the 
pen, Zeke an' his man, who were standin' 
by the pen, noticed one of 'em was sick. It 
was kind er totterin' along, and pretty soon 
it laid down. Zeke, he went up to it, and it 
was dead, so quick. He turned it over, and 
ther warn't no mark on it nowhere, so they 
cut it up to see what the matter was with 
it. They found one o' your queer little 
holler bullets in its vitals. Must have been 
shot within half an hour of when it died, 
so it must have come straight from the 



THE MYSTERY OF A BULLET. 



i5 



pasture side of where you fellers was gun- 
nin', 'cause that's 'bout half an hour's sheep 
travel from the pen. Looks ter me 's if 
Zeke's got a clear case agin you fellers, 
an' by gosh, I'd rather 't be you than me. 
Say, why didn't you take a likelier chance, 
when it was 'way off, somewheres?" 

John and I looked at each other, amazed. 

"Well," said John, at last, "let's go over 
to see Zeke." 

When we reached his house he greeted 
us pleasantly. 

"I have just heard," said John, "that one 
of your sheep was shot, and that the bul- 
let looks like one of mine." 

"There it is." said Withington, produc- 
ing it from his vest pocket. It certainly 
looked in every detail like one of John's. 

"I do not know as you will believe me," 
said John, "but I hope you will. I did not 
shoot that sheep, nor did my friend. The 
first we knew of it was when we were told 
this morning. Neither of us did it, either 
accidentally or purposely, I pledge you my 
word of honor. Will you believe me?" 

Withington chewed a straw, and did not 
look up or say anything for some time. 
Then he smiled rather pleasantly, and said : 

"My wife said she didn't believe you did 
it on purpose." 



He talked pleasantly, and bade us good- 
bye. We hardly knew what to think. On 
the train going home we talked the matter 
over continually. Surely, had Withington 
chosen to arrest us, we should have had to 
suffer on circumstantial evidence, for never 
was an innocent suspect convicted on a 
clearer case. First, Withington's counsel 
would mention to the jury the matter of 
prejudice. Our farmer was a bitter enemy 
to Withington, and never let a chance slip 
to say an ill word of him. We should 
naturally be prejudiced in the beeinning. 
Then, there was probable cause, the ram's 
assault. Strongest evidence was the bullet, 
just like John's, never seen in that country 
before, none like it to be had anywhere 
near, except of John. Witnesses there were 
in plenty for Withington, not one for us. 

"Well," said John, in conclusion, "either 
we shall yet feel the weight of his ven- 
geance, or the leopard has changed his 
spots." 

As time passed, and we were left in 
peace, we concluded that Withington felt 
we had done by him, in the matter of the 
ram, as we would be done by, so he 
had returned the good deed to us ; but 
there is yet a mystery, and that is, who 
did shoot the sheep ? 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. C, THATCHER. 



QUAILS IN THE STUBBLE. 
Winner of 38th Prize in Recreation's 6th Annual Photo Competition. 



COLE. 



C. E. PLEAS. 



Not a big boa constrictor of the jungle 
story, but a little one, the hero of which 
is a beautiful red and dusky spotted fellow 
about 2 feet long. Scientists will better 
know him as Coluber guttatus, while his 
common name varies in different localities. 
Sometimes he is called spotted racer, and 
again house snake and chicken snake ; but 
if you want to know his greatest aim in 
life, give him a mouse or a young rat. 

I started to call him our pet, but as he 
never showed affection for anyone, nor 
preference for one person more than an- 
other, he is hardly entitled to that name. 



made a noticeable change in him, particu- 
larly just after a big meal, and we could 
almost see him grow. He drank about like 
a cow in manner, and almost as often. 

We had a rat hunt in the barn one day, 
and Cole played the part of executioner. 
Among those caught were 9 young rats, 
about a third larger than house mice. As 
in the case of all other executions, a spe- 
cial place was prepared for this one. A 
shallow tray 16 x 18 inches, with a layer 
of clean sand in the bottom, was put in a 
public place, a few tufts of grass were 
placed around the edge, a glass cover was 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY C. E, PLEAS. 



A FULL MEAL. 



Yet from the time he was taken captive 
in 1900 until given his liberty last spring, 
he was as quiet and gentle, when handled, 
as if he had been raised in captivity. 

Our first meeting was down in the or- 
chard one hot day in July. I was raking 
hay; he was asleep underneath. I took 
him in my hands and deposited him in a 
cage prepared for such a purpose in the 
barn. There he seemed fairly contented, 
and greedily took his food and water when 
offered. The old idea that snakes feed 
only once in 3 months has long since gone 
out of my mind. Possibly some do, but 
my observations are different. The sup- 
ply, I believe, governs the time of feeding 
more than aught else. 

Cole was about 16 inches long when cap- 
tured, but it seemed that every mouse 



provided and the next thing was the audi- 
ence. 

_ A camera with its wide angle eye was 
given the best view commanding the whole 
arena, and was supplied with plates on 
which to take notes. Cole was then placed 
in the arena, a rat turned in, and the per- 
formance began. The rat, of course fright- 
ened, had forgotten the old fable about 
snakes charming their prey, and was in too 
great a hurry to investigate Cole's mes- 
meric powers, running about as fast as it 
could, to find a way out. 

From the way in which Cole gave pur- 
suit one would judge that he had little in- 
tention to charm, and he caught the rat 
about as a bow legged man would catch a 
pig in an alley. 

I can not describe the scene that fol- 



16 



COLE. 



*7 



lowed, it was done so quickly. The photo- 
graph "In Mortal Coil," made during the 
execution and published in June Recrea- 
tion, best illustrates it. The rat was held 
as shown until life was extinct, when the 
coils were slowly relaxed. 

The remains were swallowed as shown 
in the accompanying illustration. The 
supply of rats held out longer than Cole's 
appetite, but his instinct to kill was so 
great that he continued to seize and 
squeeze until he had executed some of 
them several times over ; the dead being 
made to appear alive by being poked with 
a thin wire. He would take dead rats in 
motion, but never lying still. 

Cole was given his liberty this spring, 
in hopes that he would remain about the 
barn and catch rats, but he proved un- 
grateful, for he disappeared at once and 
has not since been seen. 

Single specimens of this kind have been 
found measuring over 4 feet in length. 
They appear to be semi-domestic in their 



tastes, being frequently found making 
themselves at home in some dwelling, 
where, though innocent of harmful intent, 
they are likely to cause consternation 
among those who are not acquainted with 
their habits. 

One of these snakes innocently deprived 
me of an interesting photo in the fall of 
'98. About 1,000 swifts had taken tempo- 
rary lodging in one of our chimneys. At 
sundown they swarmed around and 
dropped into the chimney in a black 
stream. We counted several hundred, one 
evening, after they had been going in for 
half an hour, and we thought what an in- 
teresting picture that would make; so the 
next day I set the camera on the roof in 
good time and waited. Dark came, but nc 
birds, save one or 2 stragglers that flitted 
by. Mrs. Pleas had that day stepped on a 
big Coluber in the room by the fireplace, 
and on examination it was found to con- 
tain 2 of the birds. 

Thus our disappointment was explained. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY WM. H, FISHER. 



HIGH AND DRY. 







FERRUGINOUS ROUGH-LEG HAWK. ARCHIBUTEO FERRUGINEUS. 

IS 



A DEER HUNT IN LOST PARK. 



II . J. L. I1ARNES. 



In August, 1898, I left my home at Glen- 
wood Springs, Colo., for a hunt on White 
river, a fine trout stream, 40 miles North 
of Glenwood. All I took with me was a 
frying pan, 25 pounds of flour, a little salt, 
pepper, coffee and sugar, my rifle and fish- 
ing rod, and one blanket besides my saddle 
blanket. 

The first night I reached Mud Springs, 
and by noon next day was on White river. 
The second night I spent at Marvine 
rreek, where I caught a mess of trout for 
supper and breakfast. The following night 
I camped at the end of the wagon road on 
the North Fork of White river, just at the 
mouth of Lost creek. At 5 a. m. I was 3 
miles farther up North Fork and began 
fishing. By noon I had a creel full of 
trout, among them one rainbow weighing 
5% pounds. 

Next morning I took my rifle, a 25-20 
Winchester, and set out for Lost Park. I 
had not gone far before I came on a doe 
and 2 fawns. I did not fire at them, be- 
cause in Colorado it is against the law to 
shoot anything without horns. A little 
later I saw a bunch of 4 deer, 3 bucks 
and a doe. When I opened fire I had 15 
shots in mv Winchester ; after the deer 
had skipped I could find only 6 cartridges 
in the gun. The rest were not in the deer 
either. 

Feeling pretty sore over such shooting, 
I pushed ahead. As I rounded a bend I 
saw 2 bucks in a clump of small trees. 
They were fully 300 yards away, and I 
raised the sight to the proper notch before 
I fired. 

At the report the buck farthest from me 
drooped ; the other remained motionless. 
With careful aim I fired twice at the stand- 
ing deer. Then I raised the sight for 400 
yards and tried again, with no result. He 
must be clean out of range. I thought, and 
began creeping nearer. Not until I was 
within 100 yards did I discover I had been 
shooting at a rock. Where I had seen a 



buck fall I found tracks leading down the 
other side of the ridge. There was no 
blood, however, and I did not think it worth 
wlrile to follow. 

Late in the day I ran on to a pair of elks, 
but elks are protected here and I had to let 
them go. Well, thought I, fishing is my 
best chance ; I'll go back and fish. Just as 
I crossed Lost creek a 6-point buck rose 
from behind a log not 15 steps from me. 
The Winchester cracked and the buck went 
down, shot through the stomach. In 
an instant he was on his feet again and off 
down the creek. Two shots followed him, 
but with no result. I put spurs to my 
horse, and after a chase of 3 miles got an- 
other shot as the buck was about to recross 
the creek. That time he went down to stay. 
I jumped from my horse, drew my knife, 
and in a minute was at the side of a 280- 
pound buck. He was still breathing, and 
when the knife point touched his throat he 
made one last effort to regain his feet, 
knocking me backward into the creek. 

I had to dress him on the ground as he 
was much too heavy for a boy of 15 to lift. 
I got him dressed at last, and then came 
the question of how to get my game to 
camp. It occurred to me that I might float 
him down the creek. I tied a rope around 
the deer's neck and dragged it into the 
creek. It was hard work dodging rocks 
and stumps, but the worst of all was when 
I came to a fall. It would never do to 
let the deer go over it. I went back after 
the horse, took him down and backed 
him under the fall. Then I eased away 
the rope that held the deer above until the 
carcass came down on the horse, where I 
managed to tie it. It was midnight before 
I reached camp, tired, wet and hungry. 

I remained in Lost park 18 days, hunting 
and fishing. In that time I shot 2 deer, 1 
antelope, 1 wolf, 1 wildcat, 1 fox, 2 coyotes, 
38 grouse and 19 rabbits. I also caught 
81 trout, weighing over 60 pounds. The 
trip, including ammunition and fishing 
tackle, cost me only $5.90. 



General : "And did your men run 
away? " 

"Sir! His Majesty's 2,781st Lowlanders 
Never run away! We surrendered, sir! " 
—Life. 

19 



TWENTY-ONE GRIZZLIES IN SIGHT. 



W. H. WRIGHT. 



A chance conversation between Mr. Cole- 
man, of New York, Dr. Penfield and me, 
led to an impromptu bear hunt in which 
the hunters came off second best, though 
game was more than abundant. During the 
trip 21 grizzlies were seen ; also the tracks 
of scores of others, some of the footprints 
measuring 8^2 x 12 inches. 

I had heard of a place in British Colum- 
bia where bears were found in droves. On 
my speaking of it. we agreed that we 
3 would visit the region provided we could 
start at once, the time at the doctor's dis- 
posal being limited to 10 days. According- 
ly we left on an early train the next morn- 
ing, and 2 days later found ourselves with- 
in 20 miles of the bear country. The re- 
mainder of the journey had to be made 
with pack horses. 

It was early for bears to be out, as the 
snow was still deep, and we were advised 
to remain in town a few days at least ; but 
as we had good tents, stoves, etc., we de- 
cided to push on as far as possible and 
then wait until the snow settled enough to 
permit farther progress. This we did, hir- 
ing a man and 5 horses to pack our outfit 
while we walked. Our trail was an old 
prospectors' path leading over the steepest 
and most difficult hills. No one had trav- 
eled it since the year before, and there was 
much down timber to be cut. 

We struck the trail at 3 p. m. and fol- 
lowed it 11 miles. The last 2 or 3 miles 
we made by pounding down and plowing 
through soft snow 3 to 4 feet deep. By 
that time we were all tired, hungry and 
cross, and being then on a little side hill 
free from snow and facing South, we con- 
cluded to wait a while. After sending 
back the man and the horses we proceeded 
to make camp, no easy thing in a (country 
that fairly stands on end, and where there 
is hardly a bit of level ground large enough 
to play marbles on. - We cut logs and 
boughs, drove stakes, skinned trees and at 
last got our 12 x 20 tent erected, but at a 
cruel cost to the timber of the Dominion. 

The weather, which had 'been mild for a 
few days, became colder, with an occasional 
snow storm. We could do nothing beyond 
beating up and clearing the trail ahead in 
readiness for a move when the time came. 
This state of affairs continued 2 weeks and 
outlasted Dr. Penfield's patience and leave 
of absence. Early one morning he took 
the trail South, promising to try again 
another season. 

His departure seemed to break the spell, 



for the next day warm weather began. Two 
days later, when the man and horses re- 
turned, we succeeded in reaching a little 
bottom 6 miles farther on, where we made 
our final camp. Just before getting there 
we saw our first grizzly track, evidently 
made the evening before. 

The mountains are high, steep and hard 
to climb. Every half mile or so snow 
slides have left their mark, sweeping be- 
fore them to the creek bottoms everything 
that offered resistance. These old slides 
are covered with bushes which, yielding 
before the onrushing snow, have been left 
to grow, slanting downward. This makes 
it next to impossible to get through them 
when going- up, though one can slip down 
easily enough. Amid the bushes are little 
parklike natches covered with grass and a 
yellow lily having a bulb root. It is on 
grass and these lilies that the bears live. 
Emerging from their dens in spring, they 
make their way down to the foot of the 
lowest slides. As vegetation becomes older 
and tough they work up the steep and nar- 
row canyons, following the snow. When 
they have reached the highest divide their 
bedtime has come again. If when they first 
come out the grass has not started, they 
nip the small and tender twigs of the 
bushes, which are mostly maple. 

There is no game other than bears in that 
country, except on the high divides, where 
caribou are said to be plentiful. We saw 
none, however, nor even any tracks. 

Hedgehogs were all too abundant ; we 
never went out without seeing a dozen or 
more. They will eat anything at all salty, 
or that has been handled by man. At first 
we thought them cute, but changed our 
minds when they began to eat the tent and 
walk all over us while we lay asleep. Not 
a night passed that we did not have to get 
up once or oftener and knock the sawdust 
out of misguided hedgehogs that insisted 
on eating our shoes, hats and anything 
else we had neglected to hang on the tent 
pole. 

There were many large timber wolves ; 
we saw their tracks everywhere. A band 
came within 300 yards of camp. Following 
the trail the next day we saw where one 
had left the bunch. Out of curiosity we 
tracked the lone wolf and were led to a 
hole in a large cedar tree. The track went 
in and out. In the hole were 4 little black 
wolf pups, their eyes not yet open. We 
took them to camp and returned to watch 
for their dam. She did not return that 



20 



TWENTY-ONE GRIZZLIES IN Si CUT. 



21 



day or the next. When she did we heard 
of it, for no sooner did she miss her pups 
than she raised a howl, assisted apparently 
by all the wolves in the country, that made 
the hills ring. We tried to raise the kid- 
napped babies, feeding- them condensed 
milk. Two died in a few days and the 
others lived but 2 weeks. 

A day or so after moving camp we start- 
ed out to round up soma bears. Two miles 
back on the trail we came to a slide clear 
of snow and already green with grass. A 
half mile up the slide was an open space 
which we thought it well to investigate. 
We entered the gulch, through which ran 
a little stream, and climbed up. At the 
edge of the clearing I stopped and looked 
over the ground. Not 100 feet away stood 
the prettiest old grizzly I have ever seen. 
His head and shoulders were tawny ; back 
of them he was white as snow. He was 
not eating, neither did he appear alarmed, 
but had altogether the air of a portly old 
gentleman looking over property with an 
eye to making a bid. 

Without looking around I motioned for 
Coleman, and when he did not respond I 
turned and saw him some distance to the 
rear. Not until I made frantic gestures 
could I attract his attention. When, at 
last, he reached me the bear had vanished, 
having undoubtedly winded us. We fol- 
lowed him a mile or more ; then as he kept 
persistently in thick brush, we gave it 
up. 

Across the creek from camp was a high 
mountain with 3 large slides on the side 
facing us. Those we watched with glasses 
and there we saw our next bear. He was 
another overgrown old fellow, white all 
over. He appeared on a little lawn half a 
mile up the hill. Below him was a cliff 
some 500 feet high, which we would have 
to round in order to reach him. As it 
was late we decided to wait until morning 
and then go up and lay for him. It took 
us 3 hours to reach the place where we 
had seen him, and the ground was so steep 
and the brush so thick that we did not 
think it worth while to wait. Often after 
that we saw the old fellow from camp, 
but did not attempt another campaign 
against him. 

By that time the snow was going in 
earnest, slides were frequent, and we con- 
fidently expected some real bear hunting. 
Every old slide contained one or more 
bears, some white, some brown, some half- 
and-half. We climbed hills, cut trails, 
felled foot-logs across creeks ; but the bears 
still stuck to the side hills, ate /rass, dug 
bulbs and minded us not at all. It would 
take us so long to get where we saw a 
'bear that there was no chance for us. 
With a pack of dogs we could have cor- 
nered many. After goose-chasing those 



grizzlies 2 weeks we hung up our things, 
tied the tent door and walked 17 miles 
back to the lake. A man lived there who 
claimed to have killed many bears on our 
creek, and we asked him if there was any 
patented way of doing it. He said we 
should have baited them and then watched 
the bait. We had thought of doing that, 
but it seemed like taking an unfair ad- 
vantage. However, Mr. Coleman wanted 
a bear and at last said he did not care how 
he got it. 

We went on a few miles and found a 
man who had an old horse sick with the 
heaves. He was going to kill the poor 
beast to get rid of it, until he found there 
was a market for bear bait. There was 
an instant rally in equine values, but ws 
finally closed a deal at $20 and started 
campward, leading our bait. Our progress 
was slow. About every 100 yards we had 
to stop 10 minutes while the old horse re- 
covered his wind and composure. When 
we finally reached camp with our prize we 
felt that he fully deserved the death pen- 
alty. 

A few miles above camp was a branch 
stream coming from a range of high, rough 
hills to the Eastward. There was no bot- 
tom land along it, the mountains running 
down to its very bank. There were slides 
along this creek half a mile wide at the base 
and extending far back into the mountains. 
There, we thought, would be the place for 
our bait, as bears could hardly miss it. We 
assisted the old horse to the first slide, 
roped him over the creek and killed him 
in a little open place near a cedar thicket. 
Across the creek, about J$ yards away, we 
built a blind, and cut every bush that could 
intercept our view of the bait. The blind 
was so arranged that we could approach it 
unseen. 

We cut off the horse's head and dragged 
it a mile up stream to an old deadfall. 
Coleman was getting desperate and bound 
to have a bear one way or another. We 
fixed up the old trap, piling logs as big 
as we could lift around it to make sure 
bruin could not get the bait without being 
pinched. 

Within 3 days a bear had found it. 
That we discovered one morning and the 
same afternoon we watched the bait from 
the blind. Next morning we again 
watched, returning to camp at 11. Com- 
ing back at 2 we found the bait gone. We 
had never seen bears around "in midday; 
always before 11 or after 2. This fellow 
was the evident exception to the rule. 

We found he had moved the bait to one 
side out of sight of the blind, eaten a hearty 
dinner and departed. Getting ropes we 
hauled the remains back and watched until 
dark. Next morning we were at the stand 
by daybreak. There had been nothing 



22 



RECREATION. 



doing over night. At 9 I returned to camp 
to do some cooking. Later I relieved Cole- 
man. He came back at 4 and we both 
watched until dark. 

Next morning the bait was gone. We 
recovered it and watched all day. For 5 
days we pulled that horse one way and the 
bear nulled it the other. When there was 
nothing left but bones we piled them up, 
and congratulated ourselves on having had 
last move in the game. To be sure our 
ante was $20; but the bear earned it. 



We decided to look at the trap, pack up 
and pull out. When we passed the stand 
Coleman looked for the bones. They were 
gone ! 

At the trap another surprise awaited us. 
A bear had carefully removed our logs, 
eaten our bait and gone on his way re- 
joicing. 

We are going back next spring. Mean- 
time we invite proposals from persons who 
think they have dogs smarter than those 
Selkirk grizzlies. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY C. M. HAi 



THANK YOU. 
Winner of 34th Prize in Recreation's 6th Annual Photo Competition 



MY BATTLE WITH A GREAT HORNED OWL. 



F. G. E. BUERGER. 



In SeptemDcr, 1901, business called me 
down to the Buffalo hills, of Arkansas, the 
outrunners of the Ozarks, or better, the 
Boston mountains. I had been led to be- 
lieve that in the forests I should find deer, 
turkeys and smaller game, and that in the 
clear waters of the Buffalo the wily bass 
were only waiting" for the man with rod and 
reel. Alas ! the deer had been run out with 
hounds years ago, and as the result of giant 
powder the beautiful stream yelded so lit- 
tle that even the patience of the most ar- 
dent angler was overtaxed. Some quails and 
turkeys were reported and occasonaly a dog 
might jump a rabbit. That was all. The 
tapping of the yellowhammer was about the 
only sign of life, a welcome sound that 
broke the dead silence of the vast forest. 

"Hit's only the varmits that's left." the 
natives told me. "Rabbits? Why, hit's the 
owls and red foxes that done away with 
them." 

In consequence I hung up my Savage 30- 
30, my other guns and fishing tackle, and 
with a deep grudge against the foxes and 
owls, and especially against the 2-legged 
"varmits," my wife and I, with net and 
cyanide bottle, rambled, as of old, through 
the forest and beautiful valleys in search of 
coleoptera and lepidoptera, a tamer sport 
that that with rod and gun, but withal 
equally fascinating and undoubtedly a bet- 
ter and more satisfactory one. 

St. Valentine's day came and with 
it the first snow of the season. Who could 
have stayed home on such a day? 

"Bring me my Valentine," called my 
wife after me, with a dubious smile on her 
lips, as I stepped out into the brisk wintry 
air with my little 16 gauge Syracuse over 
my shoulder, and Nemo, my beagle pup, 
at my heels. 

That day the unexpected happened. 
Scampering along over the snowclad hill- 
side came bunnie, who had evidently lost 
his bearings, only to stop at the peremptory 
"halt" of my gun and to find his way into 
my alas, too roomy, game pocket. The rab- 
bit was a measly, dyspeptic looking speci- 
men, but a rabbit after all ; and when, later 
in the day, I succeeded in bringing down a 
chicken hawk that soared high overhead, I 
felt once more the jov of the hunter, the 
fascination of sport. The hawk measured 
4 feet 1 inch from tip to tip, and to-day 
looks down on us from his high pedestal in 
our den, much valued by my wife as her 
"Arkansas valentine." 

Not many hundred yards from our house 
a rocky bluff arose about 100 feet in height, 



its summit crowned with evergreens and 
crooked oaks, whose gigantic silhouettes 
stood out clearly against the sky. The 
spot was extremely picturesque, and the 
many crevices in the rock afforded excel- 
lent hiding and nesting places for bats and 
owls. The hooting of the latter could be 
heard a long way in the stillness of the sur- 
roundings and, judging from the deep, son- 
orous tone of their voices, I concluded they 
were of the same large variety that caused 
the untimely death of Ernest T. Seton's Rag- 
gylug. I was to find out for myself soon after. 

Snow had fallen all night, the heaviest 
snow in Arkansas for 17 years. A magnifi- 
ment siR-ht met our eyes in the morning, 
and soon we were out with our camera 
among the white capped rocks and snow 
bent cedars to get a few pictures of the de- 
lightful landscape that stretched in all di- 
rections, glistening and glittering under the 
cold rays of the winter sun. The afternoon, 
too, was spent in the same fashion, to 
make the best of an opportunity so seldom 
offered under these skies, and it was not 
until the dying sun glided the tops of the 
mountains that we reached home, weary 
from our long and difficult tramp. I was 
about to take life easy the remainder 
of the evening, when, like a challenge, there 
came from the rocky hillside tne deep, 
long-drawn hooo, hoo, hoo, hooo of the 
huge bird of darkness. The next minute 
found me climbing again, that time in the 
direction of the bluff. While I stood a 
moment panting and gazing, a nair of great 
horned owls arose from an overhanging 
rock and flew up on the crest of the hill. 
The distance from where I stood was too 
great to justify a wing shot, but I marked 
the place where the birds alighted and was 
about to commence the ascent of the hill, 
when one of the owls returned and made 
the highest branch of the dead oak tree, 
right on top of the precipice, his point of 
observation. Apparently not larger than a 
quail, the form of the bird stood out against 
the wintry sky. In order to get a better 
range, I cautiously began to advance, but 
the keen eyes of the owl had esnied the 
enemy, and I knew that in a moment my 
prey would be gone. In an instant my gun 
was at my shoulder, and when the echo of 
the report rolled back from the hills, I saw 
with pride and joy the mighty bird hanging 
lifeless in the branches, only to roll, a 
moment later, down among the boulders. 

Breathless and excited I reached the 
top of the cliff, but found that on account 
of the circuit I had been obliged to make, 



23 



H 



RECREATION, 



I had lost my bearings. No trace of my 
game was to be seen. Every minute it grew 
darker, and had it not been for the white- 
ness of the snow, I should have been com- 
pelled to postpone my search until the next 
morning. The thought of it did not strike 
me favorably. My hunting passion was 
up and once more I pressed forward. That 
time success rewarded me. There, near 
the edge of the precipice, lay the owl, my 
game, apparently stiff and lifeless. 

However, locating the bird and getting it 
uere 2 different things. The ground was 
slippery, and the deep snow treacherous. 
One false step might hurl me down orer 
the bluff. What should I do? Was the 
prize worth the risk? Was it not satisfac- 
tion enough to know that I had made a 
good shot? To all these questions there 
was only the same stubborn answer ; "Get 
your game !" With the help of saplings 
and overhanging branches I slowly began 
the descent, feeling the ground step by step, 
until, half creeping, half sliding, I came 
near enough to reach for the coveted prize. 
Grasping a stout limb with my right hand 
and bracing my knee against the protruding 
rock, I succeeded in seizing, with my left 
hand, the owl's wing. Like lightning the 
bird swung around and buried his powerful 
talons in my hand. The attack was so un- 
expected and the pain so intense, that I 
came near losing my hold. The tables were 
turned ; the hunted bird had taken the of- 
fensive. The yellow, malicious eyes glared 
at me as big as saucers, and the continual 
cracking of the sharp beak showed that 



my adversary meant fight. Handicapped in 
every way I instinctively tried to dash my 
enemy's head against the rocks, but he 
cleverly dodged time and again. My po- 
sition was becoming more and more try- 
ing, hanging there, so to speak, in midair, 
struggling with a foe that stuck faster than 
glue. To regain my strength I tried to 
pause a few moments in our pass-at-arms, 
but the owl evidently did not believe in an 
armistice, and to make the situation clear 
to me he dealt me with his free wing such 
a vicious blow across my face, that I be- 
came totally blinded and dazed for a few 
moments. 

What might have been the result of the 
fight had my enemy been in possession of 
his full strength, would be hard to tell. As 
it was, his wounds soon began to weaken 
him, his attacks grew fainter, and dashing 
him with all my strength against the bould- 
er, I ended the life he had so bravely de- 
fended. I could but admire the pluck and 
gallant fight of the owl, and I wish I could 
have ended the struggle in a more sports- 
manlike manner. 

Worn out and bleeding, but exultant and 
proud, I reached home. The owl, a beauty, 
measured exactly 4^ feet from tip to tip, 
and was promptly mounted to remind me 
in days to come that under certain condi- 
tions the hunter of "small fry," too, may 
encounter a thrilling experience which he 
will remember with as much pride as his 
brother sportsman who can tell of hair- 
breadth escapes from mountain lions and 
grizzlies. 



A MEMORY. 



EDITH M. CHURCH. 



A moon just over the hilltop, 
Shining so round and bright ; 

Fir trees that look like spectres, 
In the weird, uncertain light. 

Night shadows upon the waters 
That stretch away to the shores ; 

Half way 'twixt light and shadows 
The fitful dip of oars. 



A boat glides through the darkness, 
Then passes forever from sight, 

Lost in the Past's great ocean, 
In its deep, mysterious night. 

Will no vision come in the future, 
As we eagerly press to'ard the mark, 

Of a boat that drifts through the shadows, 
And is lost again in the dark? 



HOW THE QUAILS WERE PRESERVED. 



DAVID BRUCE. 



"I fed a little bunch of quails all winter," 
said my friend, the farmer, as I got into 
his buggy. He had asked me to go to his 
place with him to shoot a fox. He knew 
just where to find him, he said, for he had 
tracked him on the snow to a lot where a 
wagon load of cornstalks had been over- 
turnqd, and fearful of disturbing him, 
had driven down for me. He said he had 
no confidence in his own shooting any 
more. 

"Not but what my old gun would fetch 
him, if he was anywhere within 15 rods; 
but my eyesight aint so good as it was 20 
years ago." 

He had been all around the lot and was 
confident the fox hadn't left the cornfield, 
and he was sure we could have lots of 
fun. His shepherd dog would hunt better 
than half the hounds. 

"You see," said he, "I've fed a little 
bunch of quails all winter. They come right 
to the barn and feed with the fowls. I 
like to see the little fellows. Lord ! when 
I was a boy, what a lot I used to get, to 
be sure. I hadn't seen but one or 2 for 
years. This little knot was huddled up in 
the corner of my orchard fence during that 
big storm we had Christmas week, and 
I have fed 'em ever since. There were 8 
at first, now there are only 7 ; but I mean 
to take care of 'em and see if they won't 
nest close by, for I'd like to see 'em com- 
mon again. This pesky fox must be 
killed the first thing, or they won't have 
much chance. Blest if I don't think we 
are going to get another storm ; when you 
see that long, dark, streak of cloud over 
old Ontario, you may be sure there's some- 
thing a coming." 

True enough, the sky looked threatening. 
I certainly should not have ventured out 
of my own accord, but it was not more 
than 2 miles from my house, and my 
friend had always been so good natured and 
liberal with the produce of his orchard and 
garden that I was glad to oblige him; so 
we went. 

"Well, we will go to the house for a 



minute and see the missis, and have some 
cider and apples, and get the old gun." 

This gun had done wonders in its day 
with the wild pigeons and golden plover, 
and, like Captain Cuttle's watch, was 
"ekallcd by few, and excelled by none." 
It was a really handsome old single barrel, 
of Spanish make, I think. It had been 
neatly converted to a percussion lock, and 
was tenderly cared for and greatly valued 
by its owner, who was never tired of re- 
counting its wonderful performances. His 
shooting yarns almost invariably ended 
thus : "I blazed away at 20 rods and the 
old gal made a clear sweep, for I killed the 
lot." 

By the time we had crossed the big 
orchard and a narrow strip of woodland, 
the wind began to blow. It was past 3 
o'clock, and there was every prospect of a 
big storm coming We hastened into the 
cornfield, though my friend's dog was loth 
to leave the woodland, which was thickly 
marked with rabbit tracks. The snow 
had fallen 2 days before and was nearly 
a foot deep. We had but just got over the 
fence when whish ! came a furious snow 
storm. 

"If we can get to the cornstalks and have 
a look around," said my companion, "we'll 
hurry back to the house, but we may have 
him yet." 

"I told him to take the dog around the 
snow-covered mound of stalks, and I would 
be ready if our game started; but I hadn't 
much faith in the affair, and the snow storm 
was almost blinding by that time. He 
walked a few rods to the right of me with 
the dog. I heard a quick exclamation ; up 
went his weanon. Bang ! Yes ; another 
laurel wreath for the old gun ! There was 
a fluttering and stru.ffsding for a few sec- 
onds ; a few feathers blew toward us. We 
looked at each other, and the old man 
cried : 

"What in hell have I done? I thought 
I saw the fox's head and, blast my picture, 
I've shot the quails !" 

Yes ; he had. And the old gun, true to 
its traditions, had "killed the lot" ! 



"Is that the latest book you are reading, 
dear?" 

"Oh, no ! This book has been out since 
noon yesterday." — Ohio State Journal. 

25 



THE LESSER SCAUP. 



ALLAN BROOKS. 



Few ducks are so closely allied as the 
2 species of scaup, more generally known 
as blackheads or bluebills. When ex- 
amples of both species are laid side by 
side, the much larger and broader bill of 
the greater scaup is conspicuous, as well 
as the larger size of the whole bird ; but 
the infallible distinction between the 2 
species is the pattern of the wing. In the 



treme Northern rim of the Continent. It 
has a decidedly more Southern range in 
the breeding season than its larger rela- 
tive, breeding West of the Rockies, as far 
South as latitude 52 degrees. 

In habits the 2 are much alike, though 
the smaller species shows a decided pref- 
erence for smaller bodies of water, more 
often being found on fresh water lakes and 




THE LESSER SCAUP. AYTHYA AFFINIS. 



larger species the white bar on the sec- 
ondaries is continued on the outer webs 
of 6 of the primaries, or long flight feath- 
ers ; while these are entirely grayish in the 
lesser scaup, the white being confined to 
the secondaries. Even in flight this will 
serve to distinguish the lesser scaup. The 
white wing bar of the greater scaup appears 
to extend nearly the whole length of the 
wing. 

The head of the adult male is glossed 
with violet in the lesser and green in the 
greater scaup, but really perfect specimens 
showing this character to good advantage 
are seldom seen, especially in fall, when 
most duck shooting is done. 

The lesser scaup is found throughout 
North America, except, perhaps, the ex- 



ponds than on the sea coast and estuaries. 
Scaup prefer to seek their food in water 
about 10 feet deep, though capable of 
reaching the bottom at much greater 
depths. As a rule, they do most of their 
feeding in the daytime, resting toward 
night in large, densely packed flocks, gen- 
erally known as rafts or beds ; but 
where frequenting salt water they feed ac- 
cording to the tides. In the gray of the 
morning they are especially active and 
noisy. The cry of both species is very like 
the long drawn meow of a kitten. They 
also utter a harsh croak. 

The lesser scaup is a late breeder, lay- 
ing its eggs in some tussock of marsh 
grass close to the water, late in June, 
when its congeners, the canvasbacks and 



26 



song oi' run robin. 



27 



ringbills, have their broods hatched out. 
The downy young are much darker 
than those of the canvasback or the ringbill, 
being almost uniform dusky olive above, 
with little trace of the light colored spots 
so conspicuous in most ducklings. 

Two or 3 mother scaups will sometimes 
pool their interests. I once observed 41 duck- 
lings led by one mother, while the other 3 
herded them in the rear, whipping in the 
stragglers. Like most diving ducks, the 



young at first get all their food from the 
surface, picking up flies, larvae, etc., with 
incredible quickness. The young of the 
ruddy duck are the only ones I have no- 
ticed diving for their food. 

The iris of the adult male lesser scaup 
is yellow; bill pale leaden blue. In the fe- 
male the iris is yellowish brown, bill vary- 
ing from dark grayish to leaden blue. The 
feet are plumbeous, with dusky joints and 
webs in both sexes. 



SONG OF THE ROBIN. 



REV. R. S. STRINGFELLOW. 



Cheer up ! Cheer up ! Cherries are ripe ! 

cheer up ! 
High on the topmost boughs we will sup 
And we'll drink the red wine from nature's 

sweet cup, 
For cherries are ripe ! cheer up ! cheer up ! 

Cheer up ! cheer up ! The day lulls to rest, 
The sunlight fades in the clouds of the 

West, 
My mate and my little ones sleep in their 

nest. 
Cheer up ! cheer up ! cherries are ripe ! 

cheer up ! 

Cherries are ripe ! Cheer up ! No trouble 
to borrow, 

For God will care for the things of to- 
morrow. 

He brings the sweet cherries and cares for 
us all ; 

Without His fond care not a robin shall fall. 



Cheer up ! cheer up ! cherries an 
cheer up ! 



ripe 



The clouds of the evening have fled with 
their gold, 



'Ihe echoes are still from the chimes that 

were tolled, 
My little ones sleep all safe in their nest, 
Under sheltering wings and my little mate's 

breast. 
Cheer up ! cheer up ! cherries are ripe ! 

cheer up ! 

Cheer up ! for to-morrow will soon be here. 

Never fear, the God of all Nature is watch- 
ing us near ; 

Swift banners of light will soon be unfurled, 

And again I shall sing to God and the 
world. 

Cheer up ! cheer up ! cherries are ripe ! 
cheer up ! 

So early and late my song is to all, 
Through spring and through summer till 

snow flakes shall fall ; 
Then far to the South my flight I shall 

wing, 
And to others in distant lands I will sing 
Cheer up ! cheer up ! cherries are ripe ! 

cheer up ! 



"It's an Ai display," said Mr. Pitt, at the 
dog show. 

"It's a first class exhibition," replied Mr. 
Penn, "but you have the wrong number." 

"How so?" 

"Instead of Ai it is Kg." 

— The Dog Fanciers' Gazette. 




YOSEMITE CREEK NEAR THE FALLS. 

Snap shot in dense woods with Plastigmat F6. 8 Lens. 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY OLIVER LIPPINCOTT 



AN IDEAL VACATION. 



C. H. DILLON. 



One soft, balmy morning in early spring 
my chum and I started for our annual 
week with nature. By sunrise we were 
within 20 miles of our destination. A fox 
squirrel, out for his breakfast and an early 
morning frolic, scampered along a rail 
fence and vanished like a streak of dull 
red into his castle. About 3 p. m. we 
reached the camp ground, on the bank of 
the Lamine river. A heavily wooded point 
ran out into the river, and in a natural 
clearing in the center we pitched our tent. 

After everything was made snug for the 
night, fire wood up and horses attended to, 
Dan left me to the pleasant task of cook- 
ing supper while he went fishing. While 
busying myself about the camp I heard a 
squirrel barking. I got the gun and after 
a half hour's walk succeeded in getting 3 
squirrels. 

Returning to camp I had nearly finished 
broiling them when Dan came in with 4 
large bass. We had a glorious supper, 
which suited our appetites exactly. About 
9 o'clock we turned in, to be lulled to sleep 
by the voice of the creek. 

After breakfast next morning we both 
left camp and went to the place where Dan 
had had such luck the evening before. We 
caught a few small fry of bass and crappie 
and as I made my last cast, the_ fly was 
taken by a bass. Forty yards of line were 
whirred off at once. Finally, after 20 min- 



utes of hard work, I landed him, a small 
mouth, of 5 pounds. 

That was enough for one day, so we went 
back to camp for lunch. In the afternoon 
we took the guns and hunted along the 
river, getting 4 grey squirrels and a wood- 
cock. We broiled 2 of the squirrels which, 
with some hoe cake and coffee, made a 
repast fit for a king. Again the pipe and 
the night sounds, sleep and dreams. 

Small bass that we could not use that 
day we put in a little pool in a spring- 
branch near. In the night we heard a com- 
motion in the little pool and discovered, 
too late, that minks had eaten all our fish,* 
so our breakfast would be Ashless. 

The next day was not so beautiful. At 7 
o'clock a thunder storm broke, deluging 
everything and raising the river so that fish- 
ing for the rest of the day was out of the 
question. However, we went out in the 
afternoon and killed 2 more squirrels for 
supper. That night we again slept well. 
The next day was bright and clear and the 
prospects were good for fishing-. During 
the day we caught 14 small mouth bass and 
crappies and 2 channel cats. 

Next day we returned, arriving home 
about sunset, to resume the stern realities 
of life. 

* This incident is almost identical with one des- 
cribed in " The Minks' Festival," published in De- 
cember, 1899, Recreation. — Editor. 



THE THINGS I LOVE. 



W. S. JONES. 



I love the woods ; its solitude 

My senses holds with silent charm ; 

There soft winds sigh, and song birds fly 
From tree to tree, secure from harm. 



I love the flowers, and bless the hours 
That I have passed with them, alone ; 

Their sweet perfume and brilliant bloom 
In mem'ry cling, when years have flown. 



I love the lake, its murmurs wake 

A happiness within my breast; 
Its low, sweet song blots out the wrong 

That warps the soul with vague unrest. 



I love a heart that does its part 
With quiet, unassuming grace. 

I love the streams, the sun's bright beams, 
Sweet smiles upon fair Nature's face. 



I love the sway of friendship's day, 
Its ne'er to be forgotten hours, 

And musing sweet, when mem'ries meet; 
All these I love, for they are ours. 



29 



WHERE BASS ABOUND. 



J. A. BOZMAN. 



A party of my friends, summering at 
Lake Minnetonka wrote so enthusias- 
tically about the good time they were 




. FROM MINNESOTA WATERS. 

having that I determined to visit them 
I gathered up bag, baggage and fish- 
ing tackle and took the first train heading 



Northwest. Two days and nights of riding 
took me to Excelsior, on the lake. 

My friends had arranged for a day with 
the bass, and to that end had engaged a 
steam yacht, together with a yawl and 
expert boatmen. Early the next morn- 
ing we were aboard the yacht, headed 
for the upper lake, 18 miles distant, 
towing the yawl behind us. Our boat- 
men had provided 12 dozen frogs for bait. 
We arrived at the fishing ground about 
9 o'clock, rigged our tackle and committed 
sundry unfortunate frogs to the mercy 
of their finny admirers. Black bass and 
pickerel jumped fairly out of the water 
in their eagerness to swallow those poor 
little croakers. By noon we had 48 fish. 

Then we ate lunch on a little island 
near, and lounged on the rocks and 
sand. From 2 to 5 we fished again. We 
did not count our afternoon catch, but 
after reaching the hotel found we had 98 
beautiful black bass, weighing in all 210 
pounds. They were taken within' 6 
hours by my friends, Mr. Martin and 
Mr. Reed, and me. 

You apparently do not know that 210 
pounds of fish is at least 3 times the 
quantity any 3 decent men should 
take in one day. You have displayed 
your bristles by loading your boat in 
this way and then boasting of it. I trust 
that if you are ever lucky enough to go 
where fish are plentiful again, you will 
stop when you get enough. — Editor. 



Every day 13 million kind hearted 
girls sit down to the piano without a 
thought of the misery they are about to 
inflict. — Life. 



"New York is a great city for a military 
parade." 

."Why so?" 

"There's hardly a street in which troops 
couldn't fall in." — Yonkers Statesman. 



10 



A MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN DOMESTICATION. 



MOWRY BATES. 

Photos by the Writer. 



Enclosed find 2 photos of a young moun- 
tain sheep taken at Ouray. Colorado. This 
sheep is about 8 months old, and was 
found nearly dead when a few days old. 






A HEALTHY BABY, 



GROWING. 



It was raised on a bottle, and is now of dom, but prefers to stay at home instead of 
good size and healthy. It has perfect free- going to the hills. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY C. C. SPEIGHT. 

HAIRY WOODPECKER. 
Winner of 35th Prize in Recreation's 6th Annual Photo Competition. 

3t 



K DRUGGIST IN THE PEN: 



This photo was given me by the man 
whose mug is shown beside the dead bodies- 
of his 96 victims. His name is B. C. New-- 
lon, a druggist of this town. In 4 days he 
killed 73 rabbits, 18 grouse and 5 quails and 
said if it had not rained all of one day he 
could have done better. Is he not worse 
than a hog? 

K. C. M„ Sharpsburg, Pa. 



ANSWER. 

Yes, he is meaner than any 4 legged h'ogf 
that ever lived. I often wish, when I get 
such pictures as this, that the whipping post 
could be revived as a remedy for such 
bloodthirsty butchery as this man com- 
mitted. Even Newlon's'own dogs look as if 
they were ashamed of him, and I don't 
wonder. They ought to bc^EDiTGR; 




A SHARPSBURG RAZORBACK 



Half a loaf is better than no vacation. 



32 




< 
w 

O 



34 




* 



w 
»— i 

H 

W 
> 
O 

o 

a, 



SK 



TO IMPROVE THE SERVICE IN YELLOWSTONE PARK. 



E. V. WILCOX. 



The establishment and maintenance of 
the Yellowstone Park are commonly sup- 
posed to be for sentimental and aesthetic 
reasons strictly. The country included in its 
boundaries is not open to settlement or for 
economic use, and only 2 or 3 men have re- 
tained holdings within this region, in ai semi- 
private capacity. It seems, therefore, rea- 
sonable to expect that this, perhaps the 
most interesting park in the United States, 
should be managed in such a way as to 
preserve its timber, game, and natural 
wonders in as nearly their present condi- 
tion as possible. It is necessary, in order 
that tourists may be able to visit the dif- 
ferent parts of the Park conveniently, to 
build roads, which are suitable for wagons, 
to all parts of the Park which are of espe- 
cial interest. At present the roads which 
may be said to be maintained in good con- 
dition simply cover the route along which 
the Yellowstone Park Transportation 
Company wishes to carry its passengers. 
This route includes merely 4 or 5 of 
the chief points of interest in the Park, 
namely, Mammoth Hot Springs, Norris 
Geyser basin, the Lower and Upper Gey- 
ser basins, Yellowstone lake, and the Can- 
yon. If for any reason one desires to 
travel in other parts of the Park it is 
found extremely difficult to do so with a 
wagon. The road from Soda Butte to 
\ancey's is as rocky and as sidling as any 
road in the mountains, and the bridge 
across Lamar river, just below Soda Butte, 
is in a dilapidated and dangerous condi- 
tion. This portion of the Park is possessed 
of much interest to tourists. The antelope' 
along the Lamar river are as numerous, 
and as tame as in any other part of the 
Park. The fossil forest and Big Specimen 
ridge are in themselves of sufficient inter- 
est to attract tourists. While it is true that 
the Transportation Company allows only 
5^2 days for their trip in the Park, and 
therefore can not travel over longer dis- 
tances than the present improved roads, 
there are others to be considered besides 
the tourists who patronize this company. 
Of the 10,500 tourists who visited the Park 
during the past season, over 4,000 traveled 
by means of private conveyances, and a 
considerable number of such tourists en- 
tered the Park by Soda Butte, Snake 
river, and Riverside stations. None of 
these roads are in the condition in which 
they should be, until the tourist reaches 
the regular circuit, around which the 
Transportation Company travels. The 
tourists who visit the Park in private con- 
veyances are not subject to the regulations 



36 



of any transportation company, and they 
travel where they desire. In justice to this 
large body of tourists the roads which lead 
to other points of interest in the Park, 
aside from the chief features of this region, 
should be improved so that those points 
may be reached in safety. 

One of the purposes for which the Park 
was established is the protection of game 
within its borders. Nearly all species of 
game within the Park are at present in- 
creasing in number, and this is a sufficient 
evidence that the protection afforded by the 
Park is more or less effective. Poaching 
occurs, however, every year, and may be 
carried on with comparative safety. It is 
absolutely impossible for 2 scouts to patrol 
3,600 square miles of mountain country in 
summer, when the conditions of travel are 
best, much less in winter, when the whole 
country is deeply covered with snow. 
There are many trails which permit an 
easy entrance into the Park on all sides 
by means of pack trains, and these en- 
trances can not possibly be guarded by 2 
men. It is not practicable to impose the 
duties of scout on the soldiers of the Park, 
for several reasons. The soldiers do not 
remain any great length of time in the 
Park, and do not -become thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the various trails by which 
hunters may enter. They are, moreover, 
as a rule, not satisfactory scouts, and do 
not understand the habits of game to an 
extent which would make it possible for 
them to locate the large bodies of game at 
different seasons of the year. Hunters 
may enter the Park by various trails on 
the North as well as by the road from 
Cooke City. On the West they may read- 
ily gain entrance by Miller Creek trail, 
leading from the Hoodoos, or by means of 
the trail from the North Fork of Stinking 
Water. On the South they may enter along 
the Yellowstone river, Snake river, and by 
trails at the Southwest corner of the Park. 
On the West there are several entrances, 
the most important being by the Madison 
and Gallatin rivers. It is manifestly im- 
possible for 2 men to guard all these en- 
trances. Hunters may enter by one trail, 
remain in the park 2 or 3 weeks, and 
escape with their game without the possi- 
bility of the scouts learning of their pres- 
ence in the Park. At least 15 or 20 experi- 
enced mountaineers should be employed 
as scouts for the protection of game during 
the fall and winter months. At other sea- 
sons of the year a smaller number will be 
required. 

Excellent grass is found in the valleys 



TO IMPROVE THE SERVICE IN YELLOWSTONE PARK. 37 



of the larger rivers in the Park, and these 
valleys, including the famous Hayden val- 
ley, serve as the winter range for the big 
game which remains in the Park during 
the year. The protection of game in the 
Park requires that all this grass be 
left standing in order to furnish winter 
range for the game. It would naturally 
be expected that such would be the 
case. On the contrary, however, one 
can not help noticing throughout the Park 
that in all the meadows along river val- 
leys the grass is cut for hay. Haying 
operations were in progress during the 
season of 1901 along the Yellowstone and 
a number of its tributaries, in Madison 
valley, Hayden valley, and a number of 
other localities. It was stated that this 
hay was being cut for the horses of the 
soldiers and of the Transportation Com- 
pany. With regard to the soldiers' horses 
and the Government mules located in the 
Park, it seems almost ridiculous that an 
attempt should be made to practice econ- 
omy by destroying the winter range of the 
game. The small quantity of hay which is 
required by the domestic animals belong- 
ing to the Government in the Park could 
easily be fed with hay bought in the open 
market and shipped to Cinnabar. From 
that point it could readily be freighted to 
the different stations where it might be re- 
quired. The labor involved in cutting the 
hay and hauling it out of the valleys in the 
Park from which it is cut is great, 
and the quality of the hay is by no means 
so good as that which would be obtained 
in any market. It is not likely that any- 
thing is really saved, from a financial 
standpoint, by cutting the grass in the 
Park and depriving the game of their 
natural winter range. Why the Transpor- 
tation Company should be given the priv- 
ilege of cutting hay in the Park it is im- 
possible to understand. This company has 
the most valuable franchise within the Yel- 
lowstone Park, and they can afford to pay 
for hay. The Yellowstone Park should be 
maintained for the pleasure of the citizens 
of the United States, not for the profit of 
the Transportation Company. 

No mountain scenery, however great its 
original beauty, can fail to give an im- 
pression of desolation and barrenness when 
the timber is burned off. It is unfortunate- 
ly true that the present arrangement for 
protection from fires in the Yellowstone 
Park is utterly inadequate. Fires occur 
within the Park as extensive and as disas 
trous as any of those which devastate the 



forests outside of the boundaries. These 
fires occur every year, and their results are 
in evidence in every part of the Park. 
Around Mammoth Hot Springs nearly all 
the good timber has been destroyed, and 
the result is an indescribable appearance 
of barrenness in this naturally beautiful 
locality. During the past season 3 forest 
fires occurred in the Park, 2 of which were 
the direct result of unextinguished camp 
fires. The other was from lightning, and 
was of only slight importance. One fire 
burned for a month, and destroyed enor- 
mous quantities of standing timber ; while 
the other, which took rise in a camp fire, 
burned several square miles of good timber 
in the neighborhood of the Upper Geyer 
basin. It is evidently impossible for the sol- 
diers to patrol the camping grounds in such 
a manner as to prevent these costly acci- 
dents. In fact, it may be doubted whether 
the duties of fire wardens should be im- 
posed on the soldiers. This is not sup- 
posed to be a part of the work of soldiers, 
and they are not required to be especially 
fitted for this duty. Their patrol duties 
simply require them to ride from one sta- 
tion half way to the next station, where 
they meet the other patrol. They start out 
on their patrol in the morning, but not 
sufficiently early to inspect the camp 
grounds before the camping parties have 
moved on. These parties usually move 
very early in the morning, and of course 
travel in different directions. When the 
soldiers arrive on a camping ground and 
ftnd a camp fire not properly extinguished, 
it is usually impossible to fix the responsi- 
bility in the case, for the reason that there 
is no evidence for identifying the offending 
party. If regular fire wardens were main- 
tained in connection with the Park service 
it should be the duty of these men to visit 
camping grounds before the camping 
parties have left and see that camp fires 
are properly extinguished. In the even- 
ing they should visit the camping grounds 
and prevent fires being built too near stand- 
ing timber or in connection with large dry 
logs. It would not require any large force 
to patrol the camping grounds in a thor- 
oughly satisfactory and effective manner 
and thus avoid the tremendous destruction 
of timber which annually occurs within the 
Park. It thus appears that slight additions 
to the force of scouts and the establishment 
of a small force of fire wardens would, at a 
small cost, protect the Yellowstone Park 
against the greatest dangers to which it is 
at present subjected. 



Why not present several of your friends 
each a year's subscription to Recreation ? 
They would thank you for it 12 times. 



SHERIFF McFEE'S BIG BASS. 

C. C. HASKINS. 

Old Sheriff McFee was of "fishing quite Now Jonathan D. e're the sun broke his nap 

fond, Went down the next morning to catch the 

In lake or in brooklet, in river or pond, big chap, 

And down at the tavern big yarns he would And silently baiting he made a sly cast, 

spin When quicker than winking he had a fish 

But the fish being absent, his stories seemed fast. 

thin Says Jonathan D., "So I've got you," says 

To Jonathan D., who said, says he, he, 

"I don't take no stock in old Sheriff Mc- "I'd like if the sheriff was jest here to 

Fee." see." 

Now Sheriff McFee of his tackle was proud When Jonathan D. brought his fish to the 



And boasting its virtues he spoke long and 
loud ; 

"Two hooks back to back are the catchers 
for me/' 

Says the toothless old sheriff. "Oh ! fiddle- 
de-de," 
Says Jonathan D. "Why don't he use 

three? 
I don't want no hooks of old Sheriff Mc- 
Fee." 



land, 

The language he used you can well un- 
derstand 

When I tell you his prize weighed a pound, 
just about, 

And instead of a bass it was just a bull 
pout. 
And Jonathan D. said, "I snummy," says 

he, 
"That's the funniest bass that I ever did 
see." 



Once Sheriff McFee after fishing all day, And fast in its muzzle when Jonathan 



Sneaked home through the alleys and every 
by-way, 

For fear of the roast from the boys, don't 
you see; 

When crossing his path there was Jon- 
athan D. 
"Ah! what luck to-day, sir, how many?" 

says he, 
"Is that all you've got, sir?" says Jona- 
than D. 

Says Sheriff McFee, "Yes, it has a bad 
look, 

But a 7 pound bass carried off my best And wishing to add to the sheriff's re- 
hook, nown, 

Up there by the willows, at Davis's dam, The fish when set up bore this legend, you 

He looked when he jumped like a 20 pound see, 

ham." "A 7 pound bass weighed by Sheriff Mc- 

Says Jonathan D., "He's a wonder," says Fee." 

he, And Jonathan he told the story to me 

"I'd jest like to catch him," says Jona- Of this fish that was weighed by the 

than D. scales of McFee. 



looked, 
He saw where the sheriff the same fish 

had hooked ; 
For his "very best hook that the world 

ever saw," 
With a bit of the leader, was stuck in its 

jaw. 
And Jonathan shouted, while dancing in 

glee, 
"We'll have this bass stuffed as a roast 

for McFee." 

Now Jonathan D. has a bar down in town, 



"So the President is the servant of the 
people, eh?" said the man from a foreign 
land. "It seems to me you treat him with 
a great deal of respect and consideration 
for a servant." 

"Huh !" scornfully retorted the native 
born. "I guess you never lived in the sub- 
urbs." — Puck. 

38 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 



HANDWERKER DISGRACES HIS CLUB. 

Tunica, Miss. 
Editor Recreation : 

If you have room in your roasting pan 
and some red hot grease, it will be a 
kindness toward the good citizens of Tu- 
nica county, Mississippi, if you will dump 
into said pan and grease one J. G. Hand- 
werker, of Memphis, Tennessee. It is pos- 
sible you will have to trim off a few bris- 
tles with your hatchet before he will go 
into the oven, but his case demands heroic 
treatment, especially as he is president of 
a gun club. His last offense againt hu- 
manity and the dumb creation was the kill- 
ing of 135 ducks in one day. 

Did he load the product of his slaughter 
on the train and sneak off home after this 
bloody day's work? No! There were 27 
ducks left, so he remained over night and 
completed the work of annihilation the 
next morning. 

The one redeeming feature in the case 
seems to be that members of the club of 
which he is president strongly condemn his 
action, and it is safe to say he will 
not be president next year. The killing of 
50, 60, 70 or even 80 ducks in one day had 
occasionally been indulged in by some 'of 
the members, but it was left for Hand- 
werker to bring home to them the enor- 
mity of their offense. The club is known 
as the Beaver Dam club, and their place 
is near a small lake a short distance from 
Evansville, Mississippi. 

Game, such as deer, turkeys, quails, 
ducks and squirrels, was plentiful in this 
part of the country a few years ago, but 
the deerhound, the negro with the breech- 
loader, who is at the same time a pot 
shooter, and such men as Handwerker, are, 
together, rapidly exterminating it. Mis- 
sissippi has poor game laws, and such as it 
has are not enforced. 

You are doing a great work in behalf of 
the hunted, and we will welcome your aid 
in this part of the vineyard. 

Y. V. T. 

J. G. Handwerker is secretary of the 3 
most prominent hunting and fishing clubs 
having a Memphis membership. In 2 of 
the clubs 50 ducks a day is the limit. The 
other one, the Beaver Dam club, has no 
limit except what the decency of the in- 
dividual member may determine. I am not 
a member of the latter, but one who is a 
member asked me to say to you that Mr. 
Handwerker recently killed 139 ducks at 
Beaver Dam lake in one day. 

C. M. B., Memphis, Tenn. 



On receipt of the foregoing letters I wrote 
Mr. Handwerker as follows: 

I am informed that you recently killed 
139 ducks in one day. Will you kindly tell 
me if this report is true? 

To this letter Mr. Handwerker replied : 

I regret to say that the report is not true. 
J. G. Handwerker, Memphis, Tenn. 

Thereupon I wrote a subscriber in Mem- 
phis, asking him if he could verify the re- 
port. He replied: 

I have heard rumors that Handwerker 
killed a great many ducks in one day, but 
have thus far been unable to get definite 
information in regard to it. I will, how- 
ever, investigate the matter carefully and 
report to you in person in a few days. 

E. J. M., Memphis, Tenn. , 

I also wrote "Y. V. T.," saying that Mr. 
Handwerker had denied the charge. Fol- 
lowing is reply : 

Your favor of some time ago with refer- 
ence to Handwerker's denial has had my 
attention. There is no question but that 
he killed the ducks, although I now under- 
stand he says the number was only 134. 
Dr. J. H. Hitt, of Clayton, Mississippi, 
says he heard Handwerker telling what he 
did with the ducks. I have talked with 
numbers of men who know that the deed 
was done, but as yet I have no positive evi- 
dence. Will keep hot on the trail, and 
when I land a man I know saw the ducks 
I will get his affidavit. You are at liberty 
to command me for any work which will 
result in the protection of game. I have al- 
ready succeeded in getting many men to 
quit shooting ducks when they have enough 
for their own use, and I shall keep ever- 
lastingly at it. 

Y. V. T., Tunica, Miss. 

The foregoing letters are all signed by 
the real names of the writers, and are on 
file in this office, so that anyone interested, 
who will call here, may have an oppor- 
tunity of seeing them. These gentlemen, 
however, desire that their real names be 
withheld from publication for the present. 

"E. J. M." called here, according to 
promise, and assured me that Handwerker 
did kill 134 ducks in one day. He added 
that a large number of members of the 
Beaver Dam club had repudiated and con- 
demned Handwerker's dirty work in an 
emphatic way, and that there was a pros- 
pect that the president who had disgraced 
the club would be invited to resign. Mr. 
E. J. M. intimated that in case Mr. Dirty- 



39 



40 



RECREATION. 



work should refuse to resign, he would be 
deposed and publicly expelled from the 
club. 

It is to be hoped that the Beaver Dam 
club will dispense with Mr. Butcherwerk's 
services at an early date. If it should 
not, it will be regarded as in a measure 
condoning his offense. The club can 
not afford to let this disgraceful piece 
of butchery go unpunished. If I remember 
correctly, the club has a provision in its by- 
laws allowing any member to kill 50 ducks 
a day. This is all wrong, and I said so edi- 
torially some 2 or 3 years ago. Thousands 
of other men have said so when hearing of 
this rule. That any member of this 
club, and more particularly the president 
thereof, should so utterly ignore all mod- 
ern rules of decency and sportsmanship as 
to kill 134 ducks in a day is unpardonable. 
Let us see what the Beaver Dam club will 
do with Mr. J. G. Dirtywerk. — Editor. 



FAVORS HOUNDING. 

Lake Pleasant, N. Y. 
Editor Recreation : 

In my opinion, still hunting, whether of 
deer or birds, falls little short of murder. 
Thousands of deer are wounded by still 
hunters and linger for days or weeks until 
death ends their misery. Deer should be 
put on the alert, as we put up birds. You 
would scorn to prowl through the woods 
and shoot a grouse on a limb or a wood- 
cock on the ground. You want your pointer 
with you to give these feathered friends a 
chance for life and to find for you those you 
wound or kill. 

I am opposed to the killing of does at 
any time or by any method. 

Deer were increasing rapidly in this lo- 
cality under the old law, but we can see a 
marked decrease in the last 2 years. They 
are much tamer since hounding was stopped 
and therefore are more easily killed. 

I am a woodcock and grouse shooter. I 
use a 20-gauge gun and keep as fine a pair 
of pointers as there is in the State. No 
man enjoys the woods and hunting more 
than I do ; yet if I were compelled to hunt 
woodcock and grouse without my dogs I 
should hang up my shot gun, as I did my 
rifle when the no-hounding law went into 
effect. 

The last deer I killed I still hunted. I 
found him after a long and tedious stalk, 
auietly feeding on the margin of a stream. 
There he stood, without a suspicion of dan- 
ger and without a chance for his life. Even 
as I fired I was ashamed of myself and 
when his brief struggle was over I would 
have given my best rifle to bring the poor 
animal back to life. I vowed I would 
never kill another deer by still hunting, 
and though that was 12 years ago I have 
kept my word. 



What is the difference between that kind 
of murder and killing a deer at a salt lick? 
What is the difference whether the deer is 
feeding on salt or on lily pads? You will 
say the salt is put out to entice deer to a 
certain spot. I grant it; but how about 
the man who knows where the lily pads 
are and when deer are likely to feed on 
them? Wherein is he better than the man 
who kills deer at a salt lick? The hunter 
goes where he is likely to find deer, and 
the deer goes where he is likely to find food. 
Between them still hunting becomes the 
easiest and most certain method of deer 
killing. 

I know whereof I speak. I have lived in 
the forest 12 years continuously, never tak- 
ing more than a month each winter in New 
York city. There are lots of wild deer on 
my place. I frequently see them from my 
porches and often hunt them in my woods, 
but never with any thought of killing them. 

My plan to maintain the supply of deer in 
the Adirondacks would be to forbid the 
killing of does at any time, make the open 
season on bucks September 1st to November 
1st, and permit hunting with dogs. If the 
season was long there would be only a few 
hunters at a time in the woods, thus giving 
the deer more chance to escape. 

Some hunters will ask, "How can we 
know whether we are shooting at a buck or 
a doe when we can see only a small part 
of the animal through the brush ?" How 
can those men know whether they are shoot- 
ing at a fawn or even a man? Cases of 
accidental shooting were rare in hounding 
days ; now they are common. A still 
hunter here last fall saw the tan leggings 
of a fellow hunter. He fired at them and 
shot his friend through the leg. Then he 
fired twice after the victim fell and the 
leggings had disappeared, fortunately 
missing both times. 

If a man can not see a deer plainly 
enough to distinguish whether it has horns 
or not he has no right to shoot. Three 
men in this vicinity had hairbreadth es- 
capes from still hunters last fall. 

Stop all still hunting, and by that I mean 
stop jacking, floating, stalking, watching at 
salt licks and crust hunting. Then give the 
hunter his dogs and a chance to kill a buck 
and get it. 

When the guides hunted with dogs there 
were but 10 or 12 men here who were 
deer hunters. They had to keep their dogs 
the year around for a few weeks' hunt- 
ing and only a few could afford to do that. 
Now nearly every man and boy in the 
community is a still hunter and guide. 
Anyone can learn a small section of the 
forest, build a bark camp, buy a rifle and 
boat and call himself a guide. All manage 
to kill deer, and all use every device known 
to the Indian and to the pot hunter. We 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



4i 



never heard of salt licks in this section un- 
til the dog was taken out of the hunt ; now 
there are lots of them. Moreover, we have 
now probably 50 native hunters where we 
had 10 who kept dogs and were recognized 
guides. Unless a change is made, especial- 
ly in the line of protection for does, the 
deer of the Adirondacks will, within the 
next 10 years, follow the buffalo of the 
Western plains. J. D. Morley. 

GAME NOTES. 

On the 13th of November last, I left 
Boston on my annual hunting trip in 
Northern Maine. From Mattawankeag I 
hired a team to carry me to James Mill- 
more's, 15 miles North on the road to 
Sherman. The following morning I was 
ready for the woods. 

I had engaged a good guide before leav- 
ing home, and found him on hand. The 
deep snow made it hard walking, but once 
in the woods and finding plenty of fresh 
deer tracks, we forgot all hardships by the 
time we started our first deer. We se- 
cured a buck weighing 175 pounds, with 
antlers spreading 20 inches. After bleed- 
ing, dressing and hanging him up we re- 
turned in time for dinner. The next day 
we were not so successful, but the third 
day we killed a handsome doe, weighing 
150 pounds. As the 2 were all the law 
allows, I spent my time the next few days 
hunting other game, which was plentiful. 
Deer are abundant in Maine and will re- 
main so if the present laws are enforced. 
J. C. Gilbert, Whitman, Mass. 



The excellent game laws of Maine are 
often praised, yet I have it from reliable 
authority that they are shamelessly vio- 
lated all through the summer. Numerous 
camps are open all summer to accommodate 
anglers and many of those anglers feel 
that they would like to kill a deer. The 
guides have to feed their guests and it 
takes money to buy beef, so they are per- 
fectly willing to have venison and rather 
encourage the killing of deer. Some of the 
camps have many visitors to feed and 
they have venison nearly every day in 
summer. I hope this will open the eyes 
of the Maine authorities and I am sure 
the L. A. S. will do all in its power to 
break up that practice. There is abundance 
of deer in Maine, but constant slaugh- 
ter will soon show its ill effects. It is 
estimated 15,000 deer were legally killed 
in Maine in the season of 1899. Why 
do not all sportsmen fall into the ranks of 
the L. A. S.? 

L. A. S. No. 2088, Baltimore, Md. 



here for a month past, driving game into 
the open and destroying the nesting places 
of the quails. Hogs, too, are running 
through the woods destroying nests and 
eating eggs and young birds. What this 
State needs is paid wardens in every town- 
ship. It is not well for private citizens 
here to thrust themselves forward in game 
protection work. Barns burn easily in this 
country and cattle die of strange ailments ; 
but our native law breakers have not sand 
enough to go up against a State officer. 
We have a county non-resident license law 
which is never enforced. There should be 
someone in each township with power to 
grant licenses; then no one could dodge 
the issue. 

L. A. S. 41 18, Lake Como, Fla. 



I killed a big elk the other day about 35 
miles from St. Petersburg, and 2 others 
were killed on the same shooting ground 
bv 2 friends. They were all beautiful ani- 
mals and weighed about 900 pounds each. 
Our shooting society has, within an hour's 
railway travel from here, over 20,000 acres 
of shooting grounds well stocked with bear, 
elk, deer, hares, foxes, blackcock, wood- 
cock, partridge, wild turkey and water 
fowl. If you have any American friends 
who want to come over for the shooting 
season we shall be glad to receive them. 
Our season's ticket costs $75. To-day we 
had shooting and in one round there were 
10 elk and in the other 16. No elk was 
killed, though 2 unfortunately were wound- 
ed and escaped. 

P. P. Boeckel, St. Petersburg, Russia. 



I am on a ranch Southeast of Medicine 
Hat and near the Cypress hills. Reading 
matter is scarce here. When I found a 
copy of Recreation I read it from cover 
to cover. Its stand in regard to wanton 
destruction of game should meet the ap- 
proval of every sportsman. There is a 
game law here, but it is not enforced as 
it should be; and antelope, ducks and 
prairie chickens are killed in such num- 
bers at times that they are wasted. Ducks 
breed here and are killed in the spring 
when nesting. Some white hogs gather the 
duck eggs to sell and to eat. The hard 
storms in the winter bring the antelope 
into and around the towns and ranches 
and they are easy to kill. 

D. Ross, Medicine Hat, N. W. T. 



No wonder game is becoming scarce in 
Florida. Forest fires have been burning 



A merchant named Letempt, of Rileyville, Sa- 
line county, was caught with 514 quails in his 
possession. It seems he started for Belleville with 
the birds in 2 trunks and a valise, checked as 
baggage. Information was furnished a constable 
at DuQuoin, who watched for Letempt. On the 
arrival of the train the constable boarded it and 
traveled with Letempt to Belleville. There Le- 
tempt suspected he was being watched, and hur- 



4* 



RECREATION. 



riedly ordered the trunks and valise re-checked 
*o Rileyville. The constable stuck closer than a 
brother, and again boarded the train with him on 
the return journey. Arriving at the Perry county 
line, the constable arrested Letempt, and confis- 
cated the birds. Letempt was placed in jail and 
afterward furnished bond. He employed Wm. 
S. Cantrell, of Benton, as his attorney, and threat- 
ened a red-hot fight over the matter. The fines 
in this case at the minimum would have aggre- 
gated $12,850. But the case was compromised. 
Letempt paid a fine of $250, and his lawyer's and 
court fees probably amounted to as much more. — 
Pinckneyville (111.) Democrat. 



I am employed on a ranch located on the 
trail of the elk and antelope on their way 
to and from the desert, and I see and hear 
of a great deal of unlawful killing. Elk 
are killed by hundreds along the trail 
from December 1st until May and June. 
Antelope the same. Many elk are also 
killed for their teeth. There is no game 
warden in this locality, so game is killed 
the year around, mostly by non-residents. 
I hear that a guide, not many miles from 
here, killed 30 elk last winter. I have also 
heard from reliable sources that elk are 
killed on the desert in large numbers and 
the meat is sold in Rock Springs and other 
mining towns along the railroad. 

Tenderfoot, Pinedale, Wyo. 



The game laws are little observed here. 
What grouse we have are killed as soon as 
they can fly. Deer, which were abundant 
until recently, are now scarce. Indians 
and many white men kill them at all sea- 
sons. It seems the intention of the In- 
dians, when their reservations are thrown 
open to the prospector, to clear the coun- 
try of game as quickly as possible. That 
has proved the case all over the State. 
Pintail grouse are becoming numerous in 
the Okanogan country. They are the only 
thing able to hold their own against the 
coyote and the pot hunter. There are few 
shot guns or bird dogs here, but every boy 
has a 22 rifle. 

L. H. Doner, Republic, Wash. 



I wish Recreation could reach some of 
the fur hogs who boast in other sportsmen's 
periodicals of the big killings they have 
made. There are animals, such as minks, 
weasels and muskrats, that seem of no 
earthly use ; but to kill raccoons, opossums, 
skunks and foxes simply for the price of 
their skins is utterly wrong. No creature 
renders the farmer more valuable aid as an 
insect destroyer than does the skunk. Our 
Legislature recognizes that fact, and has 
forbidden the killing of those animals un- 
der heavy penalty. No other creature 
does so little harm while furnishing as 
much sport to as many people as does the 
fox. 

H. S. Wolf, Point Pleasant, W. Va. 



Many sportsmen, when on hunting trips, 
are in the habit of shooting birds that can 
in no sense be considered game, simply 
for practice. Large numbers of gulls, 
terns, swallows, swifts, nighthawks, which 
in some sections of the country are known 
as bullbats, and birds of like character are 
destroyed every year. Without considering 
the aesthetic side of the question, such birds 
should not be killed from an economic 
standpoint. They are of great value to the 
public, and no true sportsman will wan- 
tonly destroy them. Sportsmen should 
practice and preach the gospel of protec- 
tion at all times. 

William Dutcher, New York City. 



i have always hunted small game and 
observed the law, and I admire your plat- 
form of game protection. I have been in 
Northern Pennsylvania 3 years. Last year 
I got 15 grouse in the whole season. We 
had Lou Fleming, of Pittsburg, Pa:, and 
other crack shots here last season for a 
shooting tournament. They stayed one week 
to hunt and the largest bag made was 5 
or 6 grouse. It is hard to make a big 
bag here on account of the brush. Birds 
are plentiful. I contend that men who 
shoot too much in open season do less 
harm than is done by campers in close 
season. C. E. Karns, Kane, Pa. 



Early last summer some animal began 
playing havoc with young chickens in this 
vicinity. As long as he confined his at- 
tention to the hen roosts of my neighbors 
I was content to suppose him a fox or a 
coon. When, however, he levied toll on 
my own flock, I determined to hold an 
autopsy that would leave no doubt as to 
the rascal's species. I procured 8 steel 
traps and set them along a trail leading to 
an opening in the poultry yard fence. The 
next day I found the robber fast in 2 traps, 
and I was as greatly surprised as he, for 
he was an 18 pound woodchuck. 

L. H. Bower, Newfield. 



I think A. A. W. never owned anything 
in the dog line better than a yellow cur, 
or he would not advocate the extermina- 
tion of bird dogs as a measure to increase 
game. No real soortsman feels any more 
satisfaction in making a nice shot or a good 
bag than in watching the work of his 
pointer or setter. Moreover, ^4 of the 
birds killed are not recovered unless a dog 
is used. A. A. W. likens hunting with bird 
dogs to running deer with hounds. It ap- 
pears to me much easier for a covey of 
birds to get out of reach of a bird dog than 
for a deer to get away from a hound. 

H. A. C, Luzerne, Pa. 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS 



43 



Fog was unusually prevalent here during 
the first part of January and, because of it, 
some of our hunters met with trouble. 
Three members of the Chico club got 
turned around on a duck marsh. At 
dusk, when tired, wet, cold and hungry, 
they reached a spot of dry land and de- 
cided to camp there for the night. What 
dead wood they could find made them a 
scanty fire around which they sat all night 
and talked of food, beds and such unob- 
tainable things. When day broke they found 
themselves only a few yards from the 
county road leading to their homes. 

Madge, Oroville, Cal. 



A deer has been seen recently in the 
fields around Sanquoit and Clayville. The 
farmers' dogs, of course, give chase now 
and then and some men have, in spite of 
the law, taken guns and joined in the 
pursuit. The man who kills her, if she is 
killed, will be exceedingly sorry. We are 
bound to protect her if we can. It is the 
first deer that has been seen here in 30 
years. 

Does Norwood claim that the photo in 
January Recreation is of live deer? If so, 
I want to quarrel with him. 

W. J. King, Norwich Corners, N. Y. 



I am much interested in the protection of 
game, and am anxious to see more strin- 
gent laws enacted and enforced. Grouse 
and squirrels are fairly plentiful here, but 
constant pursuit has made them exceeding- 
ly wild and is steadily reducing their num- 
ber. Since the removal of protection from 
rabbits, thev have been almost extermi- 
nated by ferreters. The sportsmen of this 
county favor a short open season on rab- 
bits and would endorse a law making 
ownership of a ferret a penal offense. 

Hunter, Catherine, N. Y. 



Deer are plentiful and fair hunting can 
be obtained within 4 or 5 miles of this 
town. Excellent hunting can be found 
at Brompton lake, 15 miles from here. 
The best place, however, is 30 miles down 
the St. Francis river, at Drumhanville. 
Good grouse shooting can be found within 
2 miles of town. Coons and red foxes are 
abundant. Black bear are also plentiful ; 
a large number were shot in the fall of 
1901. Ducks and geese are rare visitors on 
the river. 

W. R. Damant, Richmond, Que. 



Duck shooting here was good throughout 
the entire season. Canvasbacks were more 
plentiful than for a number of years, mal- 
lards were scarce, while widgeon, pintail 
and teal visited us in large numbers. Ow- 
ing to dry weather and the lack of green 



food, geese did not remain here in any con- 
siderable number, as they did the previous 
season. However, many snow geese, 
checkerbreasts and honkers fed on the grain 
fields in Orange county. 

B. C. Hinman, Los Alamitos, Cal. 



I congratulate you on the good work al- 
ready done and hope you will keep it up. 

It seems there is no use in trying to get 
our State law on quails and grouse changed, 
more especially on quails. It is too bad, 
having the open season begin October 
15 and close December 15. Many quails 
killed after Thanksgiving are not more 
than half grown. Pot hunters made our 
law ; let us change it to November 15 to 
February 1. 
H. L. Manchester, Tiverton Corners, R. I. 



In March Recreation someone told of a 
deer that ran into a building: and lay down. 
Some men secured it, took it to the woods 
2 miles away and turned it loose. The 
League of American Sportsmen ought to 
give those men a gold medal. I hope their 
pictures will be sent to Recreation. 

Geo. R. Dunahoo was evidently a tender- 
foot and the old miner was filling him up 
with his road runners and snake yarn. 
Mrs. Ben Morss, Cottage Grove, Ore. 



Deer wintered well, and are fairly abun- 
dant. Mountain quails and gray squirrels 
are also plentiful. Smoke from the Iron 
Mountain copper mine and its smelters is 
killing all the timber and brush for miles 
around. It has already spoiled thousands 
of acres of our best hunting ground. This 
is a foothill and winter range country, and 
it is a pity that game should be driven away 
for the sake of a penny foundry. 

C. E. Kimball, Stella, Cal. 



Am a reader of Recreation and a firm 
believer in its principles and work. Your 
roasting of game hogs is all right, and well 
deserved by them. We have some here 
who need browning. December 26th, A. 
Van Wicklen killed 68 coot and old squaw 
from a battery, and the weather being 
warm the next 2 days many of them 
spoiled. Still such men cry, "where is the 
game?" 

Jasper Smith, Port Washington, N. Y. 



I believe there are more quails to the 
acre in this part of the State than in any 
other place in the country. Since the law 
prohibiting the taking of game out of the 
State went into effect there has been no 
hunting except a little locally. In one of 
our orchards of 200 acres there were 6 
bunches of more than 20 birds each. They 
should make a large crop for another year. 
C. S. Perry, Menlo, Ga. 



44 



RECREATION. 



I disagree with J. N. Fisher, Jr., who, 
in February Recreation, growls at the 
non-resident license laws. Take the Indi- 
ana law as an example. I am sure it pre- 
vented 1,000 Chicago shooters from visit- 
ing the Kankakee marshes, thus saving the 
lives of fully 10,000 ducks. Next to the 
stopping of spring shooting, a good stiff 
license fee is the best thing for the birds. 
O. A. Corner, Chicago, 111. 



I think A. A. W. is wrong in contending 
that dogs should not be used in hunting 
grouse and quails. If he lived on Cape 
Cod, he would want a dozen dogs ; and if 
he used them all he could not get over 6 
birds a day. I own a good rabbit hound. 
I went out 6 times last winter, hunted all 
day each time, and my biggest day's bag 
was one bunny. 

E. G. Harding, Harwich Port, Mass. 



We have plenty of bears, deer, turkeys, 
grouse and squirrels in this part of West 
Virginia. Quails would be exceedingly 
numerous if they could find food in the 
winter. The rest of the year they thrive 
famously. Coveys of 20 and over are the 
rule. Scarcely any grain is raised in this 
country, which is probably the reason so 
many birds starve in winter. 

Minter Jackson, Jane, W. Va. 



As the result of a 5 days' hunt in the 
vicinity of Notch P. O., Pike county, last 
fall, I brought out a number of grouse, a 
240 pound buck and a big doe. Inci- 
dentally I helped extinguish a forest fire. 
The game and fish wardens attend strictly 
to business in those parts. They are well 
supported by the residents and, as a con- 
sequence, game is increasing. 

P. W. Hobday, Dunmore, Pa. 



I saw Mr. Van Dyke's hunting stories in 
February Recreation. They are stories, 
and no mistake. Any deer not instantly 
killed will run when hit if it sees the per- 
son who fired the shot. If a deer dies after 
being hit with a 22 caliber ball it is from 
heart disease. A healthy deer would run 
off with all the 22's the U. M. C. Co. could 
make in a month. 

C. L. Patrick, Cedarville, Mich. 



On my annual hunt last season in 
Northern Michigan, I killed 2 large 
bucks and a small one. We have a good 
game law now and I believe deer are in- 
creasing, for I never saw so many signs 
in the same length of time. Recreation is 
doing good work. Keep on until every 
game hog is too ashamed of himself to 
grunt. 

Reuben Fish, Freeport, Mich. 



Ducks of many varieties, including 
lards, greenheads, pintails and teal, 
exceedingly abundant last spring, 
game hogs got all they wanted. It 
shame that ducks are slaughtered on 
Northern flight. They are of little 
value at that season, and every one 
then means 3 or 4 less in the fall. 

C. E. H., Fulton, 



mal- 
were 
Even 
is a 
their 
food 
shot 

111. 



I was among the first in the Adirondacks 
to stand for a non-hounding law. I was 
almost alone then in the North woods, but 
to-day consensus of opinion in the Adir- 
ondacks is against the dogs. There are 
more deer here now than for 30 or 40 years. 
I have seen scores of them within a few 
hundred yards of the house. 

Mr. R. M. Shutts, Merrill, N. Y. 



I should like to see Recreation take up 
the fight against loose dogs in the close 
game season. Without doubt a few dogs 
running at large through the summer will 
destroy more young animals and birds than 
would glut a dozen game hogs. Will not 
the members of the L. A. S. take this mat- 
ter into consideration? 

R. W. Stout, Poolesville, Md. 



Grouse were plentiful here when the 
shooting season opened last fall, but they 
were nearly exterminated when it closed. 
Quails are abundant, because they sold so 
low the market hunters could not afford to 
hunt them. Foxes, I am sorry to say, are 
also plentiful, and are destroying many 
birds. 

Wm. Leigh, Wurtsboro, N. Y. 



Recreation is doing much good here- 
abouts. Keep pounding away and you'll 
get things right after a while. This State 
permits spring shooting at ducks, which 
is a mistake. It should at least cut out the 
month of April. That would result in a 
great saving of birds. 

E. L. Cobb, Portland, Me. 



Grouse are scarce in this part of Sulli- 
van county, and becoming more so each 
year. Rabbits are numerous, but farmers 
kill them at every opportunity, claiming 
that they damage crops. Quails have in- 
creased wonderfully. 

Louis Boettger, Jr., Callicoon, N. Y. 



We have quails, prairie chickens, jack 
rabbits, cottontails, ducks, geese, brant, 
snipe, plover, minks, muskrats and wolves. 
There will be no open season on quails for 
3 years. There are few game hogs here. 
Roy Fryer, Plainview, Neb. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



ALMANAC FOR SALT WATER FISHERMEN. 

The following will be found accurate and val- 
uable for the vicinity of New York City: 

Kingrish — Barb, Sea-Mink, Whiting. June to 
September. Haunts: The surf and deep channels 
of strong tide streams. Baits: Blood worms, 
shedder crabs and beach crustaceans. Time and 
tide: Flood, early morning. 

Plaice — Fluke, Turbot, Flounder. May 15 to 
November 30. Haunts: The surf, mouth of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, killi-rish, sand 
laut. Time and tide: Ebb, daytime exclusively. 

Spanish mackerel — Haunts: The open sea, July 
to September. Baits: Menhaden, trolling — metal 
and cedar squids. 

Striped Bass — Rock Fish, Green Head. April to 
November. Haunts: The surf, bays, estuaries and 
tidal streams. Baits: Blood worms, shedder crabs, 
Calico crabs, small eels, menhaden. Time and 
tide. Night, half flood to flood, to half ebb. 

The Drums, Red and Black. June to Novem- 
ber. Haunts: The surf and mouths of large bays. 
Bait: Skinner crab. Time and tide: Day, flood. 

Blackfish — Tautog, April to November. Haunts: 
Surf, vicinity of piling and old wrecks in bays. 
Baits: Sand worm, blood worm, shedder crabs, 
clams. Time and tide: Daytime , flood. 

Lafayette — Spot, Goody, Cape May Goody. 
August to October. Haunts: Channels of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, sand worms, clams. 
Time and Tide: Day and night flood. 

Croker — July to October. Haunts: Deep chan- 
nels of bays. Baits: Shedder crabs, mussels. 
Time and tide: Day. flood. 

Snapper — Young of Blue Fish. August to No- 
vember. Haunts: Rivers and all tide ways. Baits: 
Spearing and menhaden; trolling pearl squid. 
Time and tide: Day, all tides. 

Sheepshead — June to October Haunts: Surf 

and bays, vicinity of old wrecks. Baits: Clams, 
mussels, shedder crabs. Time and tide: Day, 
flood only. 

New England Whiting — Winter Weak-fish, 
Frost-fish. November to May. Haunts: The 
surf. Baits: Sand laut, spearing. Time and tide: 
Night, flood. 

Hake — Ling. October to June. Haunts: Open 
sea surf, large bays. Baits: Clams, mussels, fish. 
Time and tide: Day and night, flood. 

Weak-fish — Squeteague, Squit. June to October. 
Haunts: Surf, all tideways. Baits: Shedder 
crabs, surf mullet, menhaden, ledge mussels, sand 
laut, shrimp. Time and tide: Day and night, 
flood preferred. 

Blue Fish — Horse Hackerel. June to November 
ist ; Haunts: Surf, open sea and large bays. 
Baits: Menhaden, surf mullet and trolling squid. 
Time and tide: Daytime; not affected by tides. 



FOR ONE-ARMED ANGLERS. 

Recently I was about to start for a day's 
fishing, in company with an acquaintance 
who has lost his right arm, when he 
warned me that I would have to bait his 
hook for him. He said he was accus- 
tomed to hire a boy or man to accompany 
him on his fishing trips to handle his bait 
for him. I went to a workbench near, 
and in a few moments I made a simple de- 
vice which enabled him to put a minnow, 
worm or frog on his hook almost as easily 
as anyone else could. The device is sim- 
ply a piece of straight grained oak, 14 
inches long, 1 inch wide and %. inch thick, 
planed smooth, and sharpened to an edge 



at one end like a chisel. This sharpened 
end is split down about 3 inches. When 
the hook is placed in the split it is firmly 
held. The other end of the stick is held 
under the arm, leaving one hand free to 
place the bait on the hook. This idea is not 
patented, but is offered freely to all anglers 
who have temporarily or permanently lost 
the use of an arm. 

Blue Spring creek is one of the best 
stocked trout streams in Missouri. This 
creek is but 6 miles long, flowing from 
Blue spring to the Merrimac river. It was 
first stocked with rainbow trout 5 years 
ago, and there have been specimens taken 
out weighing 4 to 6 pounds. The Merri- 
mac river affords good sport in small 
mouth bass, pike, crappie, channel and 
blue cat, etc. The beautiful scenery adds 
to the enjoyment of a day spent on this 
stream. 

About 2 years ago I first saw a copy of 
Recreation. I have bought a copy every 
month since. It has taught me a great deal. 
Largely as a result of its teaching, I now 
have a conscience concerning fish and 
game. Last summer, while at my summer 
home at Macatawa, Mich., I built a canvas 
covered sail boat similar to the one de- 
scribed in August Recreation. I departed 
from the description in some respects, but 
the boat was a success. It is 15^ feet 
long, 52 inches beam, and has J2 square 
feet of sail area. I used for planking *4- 
inch pine, \Y\ inches wide, instead of 3-16- 
inch cypress, 3 inches wide. For covering 
I used 18 ounce canvas. For cockpit floor- 
ing I made an inch grating, in 2 pieces. 
This grating, the coaming and the narrow 
strip outside, just below gunwale are paint- 
ed green ; inside of cockpit and spars have 
spar varnish ; canvas cover and rudder 
have 2 coats of white lead. The "White 
Duck" was generally admired by all who 
saw her. 

Arthur O. Garrison, St. Louis, Mo. 



HOW THEY RUN IN MICHIGAN. 

We have excellent yachting and fair fish- 
ing in the Saginaw river and its tributaries. 
A 20 mile run down takes us to the bay and 
if the weather permits we can take a 
limited run on it. Our favorite run is up 
the river. We have the Tittabawassee, Shi- 
awassee, Cass, Flint and Bad rivers, all 
navigable for boats of 3 feet draft or less, 
and all tributary to the Saginaw. The Tit- 
tabawassee is shallow and swift, and from 
June until September affords fine small 
mouth bass fishing, supplemented with an 
occasional 1 to 20 pound catfish. The 
others are clear and not so swift, surround- 



45 



4 6 



RECREATION. 



ed by miles of marsh and woodland, fur- 
nishing fairly good trolling for big mouth 
bass and grass pike. From about Septem- 
ber ist to November 15th perch are caught 
in large numbers in both the. Shiawassee 
and the Saginaw rivers. It is a sight to 
behold during our perch run to see the 
docks and river fairly alive with men, wom- 
en and children of all ages, sizes and colors, 
from every station in life, and with every 
conceivable kind of tackle out for a few 
hours' sport with the little toothsome fel- 
lows. I counted 216 boats filled with 
anglers during a 6 mile run last September. 
Commercial fishing is prohibited in the 
tributaries, but in the Saginaw it com- 
mences November 15 and ends April 15. 
The annual catch is amazing. It consists 
of suckers, mullet, perch, rock bass, sun- 
fish, wall-eyed and grass pike, bullheads 
and carp. 

Commercial fishing has been the bone 
of contention between Saginaw county 
sportsmen and the market fishermen for 
several years. The latter have won out at 
every Legislature, except losing the tribu- 
taries 7 years ago ; but the sportsmen have 
not lost all hope of abolishing net fishing 
entirely, as the Saginaw is the only inland 
stream in Michigan in which it is allowed. 

We have miles of duck marsh, and over- 
run land practically does away with spring 
shooting here, as no waterfowl get here be- 
fore the season closes, April 10th, except a 
few merganser ducks. 

I thoroughly agree with Mr. W. L. Stew- 
ard in February Recreation relative to the 
destruction of small fish by herons and 
kingfishers. I also add the merganser, or 
sawbill ducks. A friend killed a heron and 
found about 30 little grass pikes in his 
pouch, and I have seen half a pint of little 
fish come from a merganser duck's mouth 
after he was dead and hanging head down. 
Lee Mann, Saginaw, Mich. 



MY TROUTING DAY. 

It was an ideal spring morning and every 
thing foretold a delightful day in the woods. 
A turn in the trail leading down a steep 
incline took me to an old bridge be- 
neath which flowed a crystal stream fed by 
many cool springs. There I expected to 
make my first effort at the trout. 

Hastily adjusting my rod I approached 
a curling patch of white foam held back by 
a half submerged log, and made, with 
pork for bait, my first attempt to hook a 
brook trout. I cast the hook above the 
eddy and like a flash a streak of mottled 
beauty shot from beneath the log. With a 
vigorous jerk he was thrown clear of the 
water on the sand at my feet and in a mo- 
ment he was mine. He was the first I had 
ever seen. A second cast was equally suc- 
cessful. 



With varying results I fished the wind- 
ing stream as its course led through almost 
impassable underbrush, occasionally throw- 
ing a trout high among the branches, en- 
tangling my line in overhanging limbs. 
Thus the hours passed unnoticed until 
hunger and fatigue reminded me that it was 
time to eat. Selecting an old tree trunk 
I spread my lunch and there in the quiet 
depth of the forest I ate. A half hour was 
given to rest during which a number of 
Canada jays assembled around me and pro- 
tested at my long repast. A red squirrel 
ventured near, and, with curious eyes, gazed 
on the intruder. His curiosity satisfied, he 
scurried up a tree where he gave me an 
acrobatic exhibition among the branches. 

The slanting sun admonished me to re- 
trace my steps, so I started on the return, 
taking my time and fishing the most likely 
places. They yielded an occasional prize 
and at length I found myself back at the 
old bridge. There I took an inventory of 
my catch and found I had 14 trout. I was 
proud, mosquito bitten, happy; the happi- 
ness born of honest recreation and love of 
nature. 

Dr. C. T. Thomas, Trout Creek, Mich. 



CARE OP CANVAS BOATS. 
I have never noticed in Recreation any 
information as to the proper care of a 
canvas folding boat, or how to repair one. 
The solution, or preparation, on the outside 
of my boat has partly worn off. 

L. A. Place, Chicago. 

ANSWER. 

If your boat requires waterproofing the 
best thing to use is common kettle-boiled 
linseed oil of a pure quality, which can be 
bought at any paint store. Use with the 
oil about y 2 a cup of burnt umber, of de- 
sired color, to a quart of oil. Stir it well 
and apply with a brush, being careful to ap- 
ply it only to the part which is worn. One 
coat is sufficient. Many people spoil their 
canvas boats by continually daubing them 
when the boats do not need it. This forms 
such a coating that it cracks the canvas 
when folded, and the waterproofing itself 
becomes so thick that it cracks. The canvas 
is then destroyed. Leaving the boat in the 
water or on the shore where the air gets to 
it does no harm. Neither does it hurt a 
boat to fold it and put it away, provided it 
is thoroughly dried before folding. To fold 
a canvas boat while the canvas contains 
more or less dampness and pack it away, 
will rot the canvas. Many canvas boats are 
waterproofed with a quick drying process 
which does not penetrate and fill the fiber 
of the canvas. Such waterproofing is not 
right and will not stand. It will quickly 
wear off from the surface and the boat will 
leak. The waterproofing should thoroughly 
fill the fibre of the canvas. — Editor. 



FISH AND FISHING, 



47 



WEST VIRGINIA WAKING UP. 

Constable L. C. Jones, who was recently 
appointed by Gov. A. B. White as deputy 
fish and game warden for this section of 
the county, prosecuted his first case at Fair- 
mont. 

It was remarked by many at the time 
the appointment was made known that no 
better person could be found in the State 
to fill this position. His first victims were 
John Brown and L. H. Slater, young men 
living on the East side of the river. They 
were dipping for fish at a point below the 
first ward feed mill, when Jones went to 
the place, arrested them and took posses- 
sion of the fishermen's outfit. 

They were taken before Justice Benning- 
ton Saturday and were fined each $25 
and costs. The defendants took an appeal 
to the circuit court and were released un- 
til court shall convene by each furnishing 
bond to the amount of $100. 

The fish and game laws have been 
flagrantly broken for years in this State, 
especially the fish law. So open have 
the violations grown to be that fishing in 
the common and ordinary way, by hook and 
line, trout line, etc., have practically been 
abandoned, and the fish box, dynamite, etc., 
substituted. 

Judge Mason instructed the grand jury 
to inquire closely in regard to the viola- 
tion of the fish and game laws. 

I am looking forward to the days when 
the L. A. S. will conquer and the bristle- 
backs will be extinct. 

Clifford Merrifield, Riverville, W. Va. 



CARP FISHING WITH A STEEL TRAP. 

Some years ago my father received from 
the United States Fish Commission a new 
kind of fish known as German carp, and 
said to be choice. We stocked a new 
pond with them, and fed them regularly 
every day for 2 years. At the end of that 
time the pond was full of large fish; and I 
proceeded to angle for them. I soon found 
that no kind of bait was tempting enough 
to induce them to bite, and the frequent 
sight of a fin above the water soon made me 
desperate. I studied the ways of these 
carp, and found that they loved to suck 
at a lump of wheat dough. They would 
suck it all away, without once taking the 
bulk in their mouth. This gave me an idea, 
which I at once executed. I procured a 
large single spring steel trap and tied a 
piece of tin on the frame, so that when 
set the trap could not be approached from 
the bottom. I tied a lump of dough on the 
treadle, tied the trap on the line in place 
of the hook, set it, and held it out in the 
water a moment. There was a snap, a 
shower of bubbles rose to the surface, 
and I brought out a 5-pound carp, with 
his head mashed flat. In 30 minutes I had 



30 pounds of fish, and ot being a game hog 
I quit. 

My thoughts when I attempted to eat 
those fish are not fit ior publication ; and I 
afterward blew up the pond with dynamite 
to get rid of the small carp which could not 
throw my steel trap. 

Ed. C. Hill, Horse Cave, Ky. 



HOW TO TREAT KINGFISHERS. 
I have read with great interest a commu- 
nication from W. L. Steward, of Monson, 
Maine, in regard to the killing of fish by 
the blue heron and the kingfisher. As to 
the heron, I can not say. My experience 
with him is limited; but the kingfisher is 
without doubt one of the most destructive 
enemies of the finny tribe. I have had am- 
ple opportunity to study kingfishers dur- 
ing my 3 years as superintendent of 
hatcheries at this station. There is con- 
tinual warfare by kingfishers against fish 
during the spring and summer. We are 
compelled to kill hundreds of these birds. 
In spring, summer and fall I have often 
seen them dart into the ponds and come up 
with their bill run through a trout 4 or 5 
inches long. They will also strike a large 
trout that they can not handle, and wound 
him. Then , fungus will set in and the fish 
dies. I agree with Mr. Steward that a 
bounty should be placed on this bird instead 
of protecting him by law. I should also like 
to hear from persons who have had oppor- 
tunity to study the great merganser and 
the water ousel. I have caught them both 
at questionable tricks. 

C. W. Morgareidge, Wolf, Wyo. 



MINNESOTA WATERS. 
Your magazine is properly named. I 
never fail to read it. I note in February 
Recreation that Mr. Stick, of Chicago, 
after successfully landing a 14-pound pick- 
erel, was so delighted that he could fish 
no longer, returning home with joy. In 
this paradise for anglers, Minnesota, we 
usually find our craving harder to satisfy. 
Mr. B. and I take frequent drives during 
the season to the many lakes in our vicin- 
ity, and have yet failed to return with less 
than 20 to 30 bass of the choicest black va- 
riety. Many a 5-pounder has bent our 
light Bristol and made things hum before 
we had him in our landing net. Eight to 15 
pickerel, weighing 6 to 15 pounds each, are 
common. Lake Mary has our preference, 
with its sparkling spring water, high wood- 
ed shores, abundance of fish. When we 
get on the croppie we simply pull up stakes 
and move on, as we find it monotonous to 
continually take them off our hooks. We 
have 6 lakes within a mile, and each 
has its own specialty to offer in the line of 
fishes. 

O. S. Lowell, Watertown, Minn. 



4 8 



RECREATION. 



DEPENDS HIMSELF. 

My attention has been drawn to an item 
in a late issue of Recreation which is any : 
thing but complimentary to my friends and 
me. 'If you will do a little simple calcula- 
tion you will see that your remarks are 
uncalled for. Seven hundred fish for 
3 men in 8 days would not give them quite 
io fish to each rod morning and evening; 
and after 3 men and 3 guides satisfy their 
appetites there are not a large number of 
fish to carry home. 

I am personally acquainted with ^our in- 
formant, B. R. W., Bear River, N. S., and 
our party are fly fishermen, not pot hunt- 
ers and bait fishermen like himself, nor 
have we been known to fish through the 
ice in the early spring. I have known this 
party and his friends to return from Flan- 
ders' meadow, White Sand lake, Stillwater, 
and the Mississippi, back of Bear River with 
a catch of much greater average than ours. 
I trust you will give this letter the same 
prominence you gave the item referred to. 
R. W. Ambrose, Sydney, C. B. 



When we got the fish in we both had him. 
Pop took him from the hook. He was a 2 
pound bass. 

F. K. Middough, Harrisburg, Pa. 



NIBBLES. 
I am interested to learn what fish hatch- 
ing work is in progress or in contemplation 
for this year at the State hatcheries. Will 
you kindly favor me with a statement of 
what eggs are being hatched or are to be 
hatched and at what times these operations 
are likely to be in progress? Are catfish 
ever artificially propagated, and if so under 
what conditions. 

C. J. Herrick, Granville, Ohio. 

ANSWER. 

The United States Fish Commission does 
not hatch any species of catfish, nor does 
any State Fish Commission, as far as I 
am informed. No method for the arti- 
ficial propagation of any species of catfish 
has ever been developed. All the United 
States Fish Commission has ever done is 
to put adult catfish in ponds where the con- 
ditions are favorable and let them spawn 
naturally, then plant the young. — Editor. 



Please say to W. B. Halcomb that one 
day when Pop Slyers and I were fishing 
at the mouth of Junalice river Pop lost 
several fish because, as I thought, he pulled 
too soon. I said to him, "The next time a 
fish takes your bait, let him go a while be- 
fore you pull on him." 

He let the next one have about 40 feet 
of line. Just then I had a strike that 
meant business. I said to Pop : 

"I have him !" > 

"So have I " said Pop. 

Our lines came in crossed and tangled. 
I said: 

"Your fish got away" 

"No, I have him ; our fish got away." 



Last August while camping on the 
Cuyahoga river, I caught a number of rock 
bass, but to our surprise we found, when 
cleaning them, that they had grubs about 
1-16 of an inch long on their back bone. 
Can you tell me the cause of it? Will the 
grubs leave the fish when cold weather 
comes? 

Harry J. Hopton, Youngstown, Ohio. 

ANSWER. 

Ordinarily, rock bass should not be in- 
fested with parasites of that kind. Prob- 
ably the water was too warm, stagnant, or 
impure. Anything which lowers the vi- 
tality of fish renders them more open to 
attacks by parasites and disease. Very 
likely when the water becomes more suit- 
able the fish will improve. — Editor. 



No method of angling affords more sport 
than trolling, especially on a large body of 
water, free from weeds and other impedi- 
ments to the free use of the line. I have 
spent many summers fishing in the vicinity 
of Petoskey, Mich. With a small launch 
and a line not less than 300 feet long, 
trolling at a moderate speed over good 
fishing grounds, such as are found in the 
many Northern lakes, is pure joy. 

Burt lake, 20 miles Northeast of Petos- 
key, is one of the best bodies of water for 
this purpose. There trolling is employed 
almost exclusively, and pickerel are taken 
in great numbers, weighing 2 pounds and 
upward. A 28-pounder was the largest 
ever taken in that lake, to my knowledge. 
T. P. Wagoner, Knightstown, Ind. 

On the 7th of June, 1898, at 6 p. m., I 
left town with my wife and 2 little children 
for a trip of 2 days at Alligator Head. 
We went down at night because it was 
cooler. Having only very light wind we 
reached the Head next morning at 8. I 
went out on the wharf in the morning and 
caught 3 trout, 3 catfish and 1 shoemaker 
in 20 minutes. Spent the evening resting. 

Next morning (9th), I fished from 9 
to 11 and caught 7 trout, weighing 16 
pounds, and 2 man-eating sharks. Tried 
for Jew fish (deep sea bass), but got none. 
In the afternoon we returned home with 
a fair, stiff, breeze; making the trip in 3 
hours and 20 minutes. 

H. M. Brown, Port Lavaca, Tex. 



Persons who are interested in the habits 
of fishes should read the article about 
driftwood noises, in the Natural History 
department of this issue. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



Anybody can keep on shooting all day, but 
SOME WORK WITH A SAVAGE. 

I have 'had a Savage .303 about 4 
months and after having given it a thor- 
ough trial 1 consider it far the best rifle I 
ever owned. It will not, of course, shoot 
so strongly as a 30-40, but that is its one 
point of inferiority. The .303 shell does 
not seem so apt as others to stick in the 
chamber and break off. The gun shoots 
right where it is held and at the same time 
is sighted coarser than a 30-40, which 
makes it easier to catch a quick sight. 

When it comes to reloading, the Savage 
shell is a thing of beauty and a joy for- 
ever. I use a wire patched 180 grain bul- 
let, made by the National Projectile Co., 
and 18 grains by weight of Savage powder. 
I have been able to prove, to my own satis- 
faction at least, that the wire patched bul- 
let will hold up 50 yards farther than the 
regular soft nose, metal patched bullet. 
It will do quite as much crushing and 
tearing as any other bullet, yet does not 
damage the rifle. 

Recently I shot a white tail buck at 281 
paces. The bullet struck about 3 inches 
back of left shoulder point and about 
1-3 the way from the back bone to belly 
line. It nicked one rib a little going in 
and cut 3 at point of exit, besides tearing 
away a lot of flesh from the right shoulder. 
The buck jumped once and went all in a 
heap. I don't see where the 30-40 could 
have done better. I started with 60 U. M. 
C. cartridges ; 10 having burst, the rest 
are still good though some have been re- 
loaded 5 times. I never clean my shells in 
any way except to wipe off with a greasy 
rag. I tried to reload 30-40's and on the 
first reloading 21 out of 60 shells broke at 
the neck. 



it takes a gentleman to quit when he gets enougn. 

on the right side of the breech, just beiow 
the tube for the percussion cap, from which 
a stream of fire nearly a foot in length 
would issue every time the gun was dis- 
charged. This, the makers, whose names I 
do not remember, claimed made the gun 
burn more powder. Was this claim true? 
If so, why did not the shooting power of 
the old muzzle loaders increase when their 
percussion tubes became so badly burned 
out that enough gas would escape through 
them to blow the hammers to full cock 
every time they were discharged? If I re- 
member rightly, the cartridges for this little 
gun contained 22, buckshot. For wild goose 
shooting I never saw its equal. I have seen 
it shot at a target against guns of all prices 
and bores, and never saw a gun that could 
equal it in range and effectiveness. Was 
it the vent in this gun that caused it to 
shoot with such tremendous power? The 
only objectionable feature I remember about 
the gun was its loud report. It roared 
like a small cannon ; but when kept clean 
had no recoil, although it weighed only 6 
pounds. Old Subscriber, Webster, Mass. 



I should like to know if any reader of 
Recreation has seen a gun like one I know 
of, which was bought in Newport, R. I., 
about 45 years ago, for $25. It was a single 
barrel breech loader, though it had a ram- 
rod and was often used as a muzzle loader. 
It was made for Western turkey shooting, 
with either balls or buckshot, and used the 
old percussion cap. It was lever action 
with an open space behind the flat-sided 
breech block, which was in 2 pieces, work- 
ing on the principle of a wedge, so the hard- 
er the gun recoiled the tighter it was closed. 
The barrel was 12 gauge, about 24 inches in 
length, and was fastened to the stock by 
a bolt passing through the 'barrel from left 
to right. The stock was extremely long and 
straight, and the gun had a hammer about 
4 times the ordinary size. The strangest 
feature in the make of this gun was a vent 



YES, HE PAYS 'EM. 

I note that some wise men from the 
East are sending up a plaintive howl, claim- 
ing that the editor of Recreation is pay- 
ing his subscribers for saying complimen- 
tary things about him and about his maga- 
zine. I have no fault to find with this 
kick, for it is a good ad for Recreation, 
and it is also true. Mr. Shields has paid 
me for saying nice things about his maga- 
zine, and for fighting on his side of the 
fence when any little Coquinian war 
chanced to come bobbing along; and I 
have no doubt he has paid thousands of 
others for like services. 

This is how Mr. Shields has paid me. 
For only $1 a year he has furnished me 
a' magazine from whose pages I can glean 
more real information on subjects dear 
to the hearts of sportsmen than can be 
found in any dozen other publications. 
This alone would be pay enough, but it is 
not all. He has ever treated me with uni- 
form courtesy, and it is fair to assume 
that he extends this courtesy to all with 
whom he has any dealings, game hogs ex- 
cepted. Courtesy is a good investment 
for anyone, and I respectfully recommend 
it to the careful consideration of the hasty- 
nudding folks. 

Here is some more pay that I get. Rec- 
reation, aided by the L. A. S., for whose 
birth and rapid growth Mr. Shields is re- 
sponsible, is trying to save the game for 



49 



50 



RECREATION. 



all sportsmen. This magazine has ever 
stood firmly for game protection, while its 
editor handles the game and fish hogs in 
a commendably vigorous manner. By this 
means Mr. Shields has made enemies, and 
has lost subscribers innumerable, but it is 
worthy of note that the circulation of 
Recreation is rapidly capering upward, 
and right here I call the attention of ad- 
vertisers to this fact. I am, of course, 
paid foi saying all this ; paid as enumer- 
ated above. When some of the big gun 
manufacturers and dealers pay their pa- 
trons in the same coin — courtesy, and a 
desire to please customers by furnishing 
the best goods, they will find it will 
pay, and that more Cash will flow into their 
strong boxes. As to sportsmen receiving 
any pay, save courtesy and fair dealing, 
for booming Recreation, there is nothing 
to say only that the lovers of gun and rod 
are gentlemen ; and as gentlemen, they 
can stand with equanimity the insults of 
the howlers. Those sad eyed mortals who 
worry about pay would better go 'way 
back and stand on their heads till sufficient 
blood to properly work their brains flows 
down into their think-tanks. 

Gentlemen of the plaintive howl, it is up 
to you either to quit the fight and retire 
from the field, or else to lay down your 
scalping knives and your poisoned arrows, 
and take up modern weapons of warfare. 
The methods and the weapons you are 
now using will not go in this era. The 
days of savagery are past, and real men 
do not now tomahawk their enemies either 
literally or verbally. 

A. L. Vermilya, Columbiaville, Mich. 



PREFERS THE 44-40. 

All the various rifle calibers are good, 
and should be used for what they were de- 
signed by the originators. The way to 
make this department interesting and in- 
structive is to write the facts as they are, 
the caliber of the rifle, the kind of ammu- 
nition and the distance the game was hit, 
and then let each reader judge for himself. 

The 30-30 and 30-40 when used with steel 
or full mantled bullets are military arms, 
of course ; but with soft pointed bullets 
their effect on big game is deadly. In 
face of the evidence that has been pro- 
duced, any man who says the 38-55 is 
equal or superior as a game killer to the 
30-40 stamps himself as ignorant and 
inexperienced. It also makes most 
sportsmen tired to read about the 25-35 
making a hole 4 times larger than a 45. 
Those of us who have had experience with 
the 30's know such claims for the 25-35 
are nonsensical. To my mind the 30 cali- 
bers should not be compared with black 
powder guns as they are entirely different. 
My favorite is the little 44-40, but I hate to 



see men ignore facts and set at naught the 
merits of an arm so powerful and effective 
as the 30. 

The Winchester people do not say the 
32-40 and 38-55 are the best all around 
cartridges. Those loads were designed for 
target shooting in the old Ballard rifle. 
They became popular at once and soon 
Stevens, Remington, Winchester and other 
makers built more target rifles for those 
calibers than for any others. Those cart- 
ridges hold nearly all the finest rifle rec- 
ords up to 500 yards; showing that the 
originators knew their business. But ac- 
cording to the Winchester tables the 32-40 
and 38-55 as big game killers, are not in it 
with most of the cartridges named on 
that list. Most all the 38, 40, and 45 
calibers shoot flatter, have a higher velocity 
and more penetration. The 40 and 45 
calibers have a much larger diameter. It 
is not necessary for a hunting rifle to put 
16 consecutive shots into a 2 inch circle at 
200 yards. Killing pover, not extreme 
accuracy, is the ihing of prime importance. 
Penetration, diameter and striking power 
constitute killing power. The 32-40 and 
38-55 do not possess those qualities to any 
great extent. We also must not forget that 
90 per cent, of big game killed is shot with- 
in 200 yards, and almost any rifle will 
shoot with enough accuracy to hit game at 
or even beyond that distance. Many of the 
40 and 45 calibers shoot well up to 2,000 
yards. The Winchester table is both 
interesting and instructive, and every 
sportsman ought to get a copy and study 
it. If he can reason and does not forget the 
simple law of cause and effect, he must 
come to the conclusion that a large bullet 
that penetrates a goodly number of boards, 
must be a much better killer than a small 
one that penetrates' fewer. 

Wenzel Mashek, Kewaunee, Wis. 



DENOUNCES MUTILATION. 

Saylesville, R. I. 
Editor Recreation : 

In reading the letters in January number 
by Terry Smith and W. W. Prentice, rela- 
tive to the work of the 30 caliber rifle, I 
was filled with disgust at the mutilation 
recorded. 

I own a 30-30 rifle which I bought some 
time ago, but have not yet used on game, 
and, in my present frame of mind, I shall 
not use it. For 6 or 7 seasons I used a 
38-55 for deer shooting and found it a 
perfect rifle for the work. There are, of 
course, several cartridges of more or less 
similar power, which answer almost as 
well ; but I caught the craze, sold my 38 
and bought a "modern weapon." How- 
ever, if I can not shoot deer without 
tearing 7 inch holes or disemboweling them, 
I will go out of the business. 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



51 



Why a man need blow off whole sections 
of a deer's head in order to kill it I can not 
explain. These are simply hints as to 
what those articles described. 

One writer says that after seeing 2 
deer almost blown to pieces his guide be- 
came a believer in the small bore rifle ! I 
nave always thought the only use of a 
rifle was to kill; simply and cleanly kill. 
One might judge from many descriptions 
published within the last 2 or 3 years that 
total annihilation was the end to be at- 
tained. Possibly, in the near future, some- 
body may bring out a weapon which, at 
its discharge, will destroy every vestige of 
the game aimed at. Then the 30-30 will not 
be in it, and there will be a mad rush for 
the new gun because of its power. 

I believe in using tools or weapons 
adapted to the work required. Undoubted- 
ly the 30 has its place and its uses, but in 
its indiscriminate use, it becomes a danger 
because of the great surplus power exerted. 
Moreover, it is, and must always be, ex- 
tremely wasteful of meat. 

I am fully convinced that 4 out of every 
5 of such rifles are as unnecessary for the 
use they are put to as a 12 inch naval gun 
would be. I have no excuse to offer for 
owning, one myself except my anxiety to 
be recent. If ever I use my 30 on deer it 
will be with a reduced charge or low pres- 
sure powder. 

I wonder if anyone else is tired of hear- 
ing about the wonderful, I call it horrible, 
work of the 30-30. L. A. Jordan.. 



GOOD LOADS FOR THE 30-40. 

Having noticed a number of inquiries in 
Recreation as to the best all around rifle, 
I recommend the 30-40 Winchester as being 
one of the best. 

A good short range load for the 30-40 
for target and small game is 9 grains Du- 
Pont shot gun smokeless loose in shell ; 
8 z /2 or 2^2 Winchester primer ; and Mr. 
Beardsley's bullet, No. 3086, 101 grains, or 
the Ideal No. 30812, 113 grains, cast 1 to 
10 and well lubricated. Seat bullet in shell 
just deep enough to cover lubrication, with 
no crimp. If bullets are loose in expand- 
ed shell, use a muzzle sizer. The sharp- 
pointed bullet will not tear small game so 
badly as the flat point. This load is clean 
and accurate and about equal in power to 
a 32-20. Another load which will do fine 
work and is somewhere near a 38-55 is 52 
grains (Ideal measure) semi-smokeless 
ffffg. and a 220 grain lubricated wire 
patched bullet. Those bullets are perfec- 
tion and are advertised in Recreation. 

A great deal of useful information in 
regard to reloading and reloading tools is 
contained in the Ideal Hand Book. A good 
plan for anyone using high power smoke- 



less rifles is to keep an Ideal broken shell 
extractor at hand. They will save trouble, 
delay and bad words. But unless care and 
judgment is used in experimenting with 
smokeless powders a good insurance policy 
is the most important thing to have on 
hand. 

I use Lyman receiver and ivory bead 
sights. The rear sight can be instantly ad- 
justed to any load. Tell A. G. Burg, Liv- 
ingston, Mont., that the Ithaca No. 1 or 
2 is the best medium priced gun in the 
world. O. E. Raynor, Meadville, Pa. 



A DOUBTING THOMAS. 

In February Recreation Mr. Van Dyke 
tells of his wonderful exploits with a 
Stevens Favorite. Why didn't he sign his 
name Van Winkle? Then the charitable 
might believe that he fell asleep on some 
mountain and dreamed that gun story. 
Think of a 22 caliber bullet containing 45 
grains of lead, with a penetration of 5 pine 
boards, passing through the shoulder of a 
bull elk and breaking a rib on the oppo- 
site side. Think of his shooting 4 deer, 
all through, or near, the heart. Imagine, if 
you can, his loading and firing a single shot 
rifle 4 times at a running deer. Why is he 
not with Buffalo Bill? Then when he inves- 
tigates he finds he has killed 4 deer with 
those 4 shots while thinking there was but 
one deer all the while. If Syracuse thought 
some of Mr. Van Dyke's other stories were 
fishy, what does he think of this later ro- 
mance ? 

I have shot squirrels with a 22, but some- 
times had to use 3 or 4 bullets to make 
a neat finish. Mr. Van Dyke gets a bullet 
stuck in the barrel of his 22 and blows 
it out with another cartridge. It bulges 
the barrel some. Then the poor little gun 
falls under the wheels of a wagon and the 
barrel is bent. Thrown away and left to 
lie outdoors several months it is finally 
restored to alignment and usefulness by 
being hammered over a log. "Good medi- 
cine for the crowbar, good medicine for 
the gun." Great ! 

Moral : Throw away your 30-40 and 45- 
70 guns and get a 22 for big game. 

E. G. Moulton, Derby Line, Vt. 



A CONVERT TO MODERATION. 

I have been reading Recreation regu- 
larly for some time, though I was guilty of 
throwing the first copy I saw under the 
table with the remark that I would not 
spend my time with such rot. I had grown 
up in a region where the chap that killed 
the most game was the best man. I shot 
26 deer in 3 weeks one season, and 
thought I was a great sportsman, but after 
reading your publication a while I changed 



52 



RECREATION. 



my mind about it. Now I stand in line 
to protect game in every way possible. 

Therefore, I was sorry to see the Mar- 
lin Co. and the Peters Cartridge Co. with- 
draw their ads from Recreation. I know 
from experience that both concerns de- 
serve hearty praise for protecting our game, 
as I will guarantee that anyone using their 
goods exclusively will be in little danger of 
getting roasted as a game hog. I was out 
with a party one fall for a duck hunt, and 
we were unable to kill enough for the camp 
table, though ducks were plentiful. Four 
of us were crack wing shots, but we had 
no ammunition with us except Peters' 
Quick Shot cartridges. Last fall I used the 
U. M. C. New Club, and, although I am 
a Winchester partisan, I had to acknowl- 
edge they do execution. 

My gun is an old timer and will not do 
good work with nitro powder, but makes 
some record breaking kills with New Rival 
or New Club black powder shells. 

F. B. Lamb, Washburn, Wis. 



REGARDING BULLETS. 

In reply to Amateur, whose letter ap- 
peared in February Recreation, I will say 
that lead bullets do not develop so great 
a velocity as metal patched bullets. A metal 
patched bullet will give ioo feet more ve- 
locity than a lead bullet with the same 
quantity of powder. Accuracy can not be 
maintained with a lead bullet at over 1,500 
feet velocity. Another reason is that 
smokeless starts a bullet much quicker than 
black powder and a lead bullet is likely to 
jump the rifling at the breech. 

Some people use Recreation as they 
would a tin horn, to talk through. Do not 
write things that people will not believe. 
Mr. Van Dyke, of Red Lodge, Mont., tells 
of killing a number of elk and deer with 
one shot each from a Stevens 22. He says 
he shot deer at 75 yards running straight 
from him and the little 22 put a bullet 
through the heart of every one. The 
Stevens must have excellent penetration. 

There are a number of good shot guns, 
but the Winchester '97 model excels them 
all. With mine, I have put 310 No. 8 
shot into a 30 inch circle at 40 yards. My 
load was 3 drams powder, 1 ounce shot. 
With shot spreaders in the same load I can 
put about 175 pellets into the same target. 

I gave wire patched bullets a trial in 
my 38-55 last fall. They are excellent for 
all but game killing. They do not expand 
on striking bone. 

M. C. McGowan, Lawrence, Mich. 



rifle will shoot into 50 inches of pine 
boards. As R. M. C. mentions the 30-30, 
we take this opportunity to explain that it 
is our .303 full jacketed bullet cartridge 
fired from a Savage rifle which penetrates 
50 inches or more of clear pine. We had 
an exhibition at Detroit, Boston and New 
York shows, in which there are pine logs 
showing this extent of penetration. The 
bullets have traversed the wood end-wise, 
which is a greater test than across the 
grain, the wood being stronger end-wise, 
and more power being required to crush the 
fibers than if the bullet were going across 
the grain. We have in some instances se- 
cured better results than 50 inches, but 
sometimes the bullet will not reach so far 
as that, owing to some extra resistance in 
the fibers of the wood. We have noticed 
that if a wood contains much rosin it will 
materially reduce the penetration. 

Savage Arms Co. 



PETERS' FRIEND DISAPPROVES OP HIM. 

Dover, N. H. 
Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio : 

Dear Sirs : — I think you are wrong when 
you accuse Mr. G. O. Shields of doing you 
an injustice. The fault is probably with 
the extractor of the gun being worn or the 
springs weak. It certainly is not with 
the shells, because I have a Winchester and 
have shot at least 1,000 new Victor shells 
in it. I shall be in the market later for a 
lot of your goods and expect to have large 
sales. I consider the Peters goods equal 
to any on the market. 

Yours truly, L. C. Hunt. 



PENETRATION of the savage. 

In March Recreation we came across 

a letter written by R. M. C, Red Lodge, 

Mont., in which he mentions that the 

Savage Arms Company claims the Savage 



SMALL SHOT. 
For ducking I use a 6y 2 pound Clai- 
brough, full choke. It will kill at 75 to So 
yards. Those who claim that black pow- 
der is superior to smokeless, taking every- 
thing into consideration, are mistaken. 
There are good and poor smokeless pow- 
ders. The 2 best are Dupont and 
Laflin & Rand. I find Winchester Blue 
.Rival shells with Laflin & Rand smokeless 
a load which can not be bettered, and it is 
within reach of all. I am with you in your 
struggle against the game hogs. We are 
troubled with a few here. 

S. E. Sangster, Pt. Perry, Can. 

In looking over recent numbers of 
Recreation I find no mention of Stevens' 
Ideal rifle No. 44. I have one, chambered 
for the 22 long rifle cartridge, that I have 
given a thorough test. It will shoot short 
and long cartridges accurately up to 100 
yards. When weather conditions are 
favorable it will, using the long rifle 
cartridge, do good work at 200 yards. 
For squirrels, rabbits and other small game 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



53 



this weapon is not excelled by any other 
single shot rifle in the market. Any 
one wanting a first class gun at a moderate 
price should select a Stevens Ideal. 

A. L. Fritts, Olpe, Kans. 

Is there a 22-7^-45 cartridge made with 
smokeless or semi-smokeless powder? If 
so, who makes it? If there is such a cart- 
ridge, have any of your readers tried it, 
and if so, with what results? I have just 
bought a 22 Winchester R. F. rifle and 
think it all right. I have a 44 C. F. rifle 
I bought last fall. Though fitted with Ly- 
man sights, it does not come up to my ex- 
pectation. I am going to sell it and get 
either a Winchester 30-30 or a Savage 
303. Which of the 2 has the flattest tra- 
jectory? 

G. M. Miller, Montreal, Que. 

What shell and load would you use in a 
Forehand single barrel for ducks? 

What is the velocity of a 32 calibre rim 
fire cartridge fired from a Stevens Fa- 
vorite? 

E. F. Gillespie, New York City. 

ANSWER. 

The velocity of the 32 short rim fire 
is about 980 feet a second ; the 32 long 
rim fire, 1,025 feet. — Editor. 

In a Forehand single barrel gun, for 
ducks, I should use U. M. C. or Winches- 
ter No. 4 shot. — Editor. 



I should like to give Mr. Jones, of Slate 
Hill, Pa., the benefit of my experience with 
guns. I have owned 2 Colt 12 gauge, 1 
Claibrough 10 gauge, 2 Greener 12 gauge 
and 2 Greener 16 guage guns. I used all 
more or less for game and trap shooting, 
and while the 16 gauge was not quite so 
effective in trap shooting it was an ideal 
field gun. The last 16 I worked was an 
ejector Greener, and I used it with the 
greatest satisfaction on quails, snipe, and 
ducks all through the South. 

E. C. Hall, Ashfield, Mass. 



I use a 32-40 Winchester for deer and 
for that purpose prefer it to all other 
calibers. I shot 4 deer last season, 
securing 3 of them. The other I could 
have got had there been a tracking snow. 

1 fired twice, hitting him back of the 
shoulder and in the hip. He continued 
running, and as the wounds soon stopped 
bleeding, I could not follow. Of the others 

2 dropped instantly and the third ran 
not more than 6 or 7 rods. My favorite 
for larger game is the '76 model, 45-75 
Winchester. Louis Luder, Caro, Mich. 



choke for nitro powder? In the former the 
barrel is cut true cylinder bore from the 
breech to within an inch of the muzzle. 
The muzzle is left about 1-64 inch smaller 
than the rest of the barrel. Will some one 
who has used the Winchester 30-40 on big 
game give me his experience? What is 
a good load for shore birds? 

Warren J. Barlow, Wollaston, Mass. 



I should like to know the tensile strength 
of the Winchester rolled steel rifle barrels. 
Can you tell me? 

John Bowden, Spring Valley, Minn. 

The question was forwarded to the Win- 
chester people and they replied: 

Nickel steel for high velocity rifle bar- 
rels we buy with an elastic limit of 80,000 
pounds. Steel for black powder barrels we 
buy with an elastic limit of 40,000 to 45,000 
pounds. 

Winchester Repeating Arms Co. 



I should like to find out whether the 
soft nose or the full metal cased bullet is 
the better for big game. I have had vary- 
ing success with both. On one occasion I 
shot a wolf at 200 yards with a Winchester 
30-30. The bullet, a soft nose, struck the 
backbone and did not pass through the 
animal. Out of 18 deer shot with hard 
nose bullets, in front parts, 11 ran ^ of a 
mile to 3 miles. B. S., Ithaca, N. Y. 



A year ago I wrote Recreation asking 
advice about choosing a quail gun, and was 
urged to order an Ithaca 12 bore, 28 
inch, weight 6}i pounds left barrel 
modified, right barrel cylinder. I did 
so, and received a 1902 model Ithaca 
gun, with the new cross bolt and fore end 
ejector. I thank Recreation for helping 
me find just wdiat I wanted. 

Northwest, Sioux City, la. 



I use only Dupont smokeless powder in 
shot gun, rifle and revolver. While I have 
used nearly all other makes, I consider that 
the best in every way. Am now using U. 
M. C. smokeless shells altogether, and their 
metallics in my smaller arms. U. M. C. 
goods are simply perfection. 

L. D. Whittemore, Redlands, Cal. 



Which is the best way to choke bore a 
gun barrel for hard and close shooting? Is 
the taper choke bore as good as the full 



I have seen nearly all kinds of shot 
guns, and have owned a great many. Ex- 
perience has taught me that there is no 
better shooting gun than the Ithaca. By 
ordering a gun from the Ithaca Co. you 
can get just what you want, and it will be 
the best of its kind. 

O. J. Emerson, Kendallville, la. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. It photographed, it may still live and its education 

and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



WHAT CAUSED THE TAPPING SOUND. 

T. F. Covert, in March Recreation asks. 
"What is it?" and the same question I have 
asked myself several times of late years 
while on fishing expeditions, but about 2 
years ago I got my first clue to the prob- 
lem, which came to me just as it came to 
Mr. Covert; the conditions being always as 
he states them in his inquiry. It is noth- 
ing more nor less than a poor, old, skinny, 
bony, dried-up, demented carp, or white 
sucker, the abomination of a true angler. 
I do not like the name fish hog, but I 
should be willing to acquire it if I could 
kill all the suckers and carp in existence, 
and I should be willing to be roasted by 
Coquina as thoroughly as he roasted my 
friend and neighbor, B. I. Jones, the duck 
shooter. 

In the spring of '99 I was visiting in 
the vicinity of Buckeye lake, on the banks 
of Lake run. At that place the run has 
been washed out in 2 or 3 pools to the 
depth of 8 or 10 feet. There one spring 
morning I found myself before sunrise, and 
heard that tapping, or rather smacking, 
sound as it was on that occasion. These 
pools were shaded by several large Ameri- 
can elm trees and the blossoms, falling 
into the water and being blown by the wind 
or carried by the waves, had gathered in 
large patches on the surface. These patches 
were surrounded by great, big, rawboned, 
slab-sided, dun-colored, flabby, bottle- 
nosed carp, weighing 3 to 15 pounds, their 
bodies half out of the water, sucking in 
those elm blossoms by the quart. In one 
patch I counted 13 of these abominable 
fish and I was frantic in my appeal for 
something with which to exterminate them. 
I would have given my kingdom and 
thrown in my best fishing rod as induce- 
ment, which, in fact, is worth more than 
my kingdom. 

I ran to the house, about a quarter of a 
mile away, got one of Paddy Marlin's 30- 
something rifles and rushed back to wreak 
vengeance on those abominations. They 
were still at work when I returned. With 
care I aimed the gun at the biggest, raw- 
bonedest, slab-sidedest, dun-coloredest, and 
let go. When the smoke cleared away the 
water was full of the red bellied whelks, 
but before I could get a stick and get any 
out in order to tramp them into the mud 
with my feet, they all came to life and 
disappeared. But then you know a Marlin 
is of no account anyway. 

Some time afterward, when sitting on the 



bank of a creek, I heard that same tapping 
sound, and grabbing a rock I peered over 
the bank. That time I saw a poor, old, 
skinny, white sucker, belly up, on the un- 
der side of a root, sucking away for dear 
life and squirting the dirt and sediment 
through his gills as if it was good. 
A number of times since I have seen the 
same performance repeated. Of course I 
threw that rock at the sucker. What did 
you think I picked it up for? 

, Tnos. H. Jones, Newark, Ohio. 

About 5 years ago a number of us were 
camping out in the Eastern part of Iowa, 
along the Maquoketa river. One day while 
strolling along the bank of the river I 
heard just such a noise as Mr. Covert de- 
scribes. There was a sandbar about 30 
feet from the bank, running parallel with 
it, and at the lower end was a large pile 
of drift, connecting the bar with the bank. 
I examined the pool closely and failed to 
find a living thing in sight in the neighbor- 
hood .of the noise, but, like Mr. Covert, I 
noticed that bits of drift bobbed up when- 
ever I heard the noise. I. waited some 
time, but finally went back to camp, wonder- 
ing. The next day I visited the pool at a 
different hour and I saw at least a dozen 
turtles out on the logs, sunning themselves. 
They were what are commonly called snap- 
ping turtles. I visited the place many times, 
going up quietly, in order not to frighten 
the turtles, and watching them closely, but 
I was never able to determine whether or 
not it was the turtles that made the noise. 
I do not remember seeing a turtle out of the 
water when I heard the noise. I decfded 
that it was one of their modes of feeding, 
probably gathering the snails or other ani- 
mals that were on the under side of the 
drift. Now I, like 'Mr. Covert, would like 
to know positively what made the noise. I 
have never seen so many turtles in one 
place before or since and never heard the 
noise at any other place. 

J. D. B., Colorado Springs, Colo. 

From Mr. T. F. Covert's description of 
the tapping he heard, I have no hesitation 
in saying that it was caused by a fish of 
the sucker variety. When a boy, I was once 
fishing in the Sequachee river, at the foot 
of Cumberland mountain, in Tennessee. I 
had chosen a quiet, shady nook, an ideal 
place for fishing, but a poor place for fish, 
as I soon found. After a time I heard 
this same tapping, or sucking, sound de- 
scribed by Mr. Covert and determined to 



54 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



55 



investigate. Moving a little nearer the 
spot whence the sound seemed to come I 
soon located it in a mass of sticks and 
leaves collected by the current about a 
half submerged log. The water being 
clear I soon discovered fish. Going home 
I rigged up a small spear and returned. 
Stepping out on the log and waiting some 
time I secured 2 or 3 small fishes and then 
tried another place, with the same result. 
Just what kind they were I am not prepared 
to say, but I remember they all had sucker 
mouths and I am inclined to think they 
were feeding. I have heard them many 
times since. Anyone who will quietly ap- 
proach a drift in a stream any day in 
summer and remain still a short time will 
be rewarded by hearing that sound. 

F. F. Mottelen, Primghar, Iowa. 

Some years ago, while fishing in the 
Iowa river, I noticed the peculiar noise 
mentioned by Mr. Covert, in a drift imme- 
diately above a fallen tree. On investigat- 
ing I found that every time the noise was 
made a stick or a small piece of bark could 
be seen to rise and fall at intervals. I 
decided that the disturbance was made by a 
sucker. Wishing to be positive I placed a 
small hook on my line, baited it with an 
angle worm, placed a small sinker above 
the hook and lowered it into the drift 4 
to 6 inches below .the surface of the water, 
where it was in motion. In a few seconds 
I landed the fish, which proved to be a 
sucker. It is a question in my mind 
whether these fish feed on the decaying 
wood or the insects found therein, or 
whether they simply make the noise for pas- 
time. I have been fortunate enough, once or 
twice, to see these fish sucking on the un- 
der side of a drift and their body is almost 
perpendicular in the water. If Mr. Covert 
will take time to investigate this matter, I 
feel confident he will have a counterpart of 
my experience. 

C. L. Bowen, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

I read many magazines and newspapers, 
but none is more welcome than Recrea- 
tion. I may be able to throw light on Mr. 
T. F. Covert's perplexity. I have heard 
sounds such as he describes, and several 
times have traced them to what I think is 
the source. If Mr. Covert had thrust a 
fish spear through the debris he would 
most likely have impaled a fish of the 
sucker variety. These fish feed largely on 
the low vegetable and animal life that ac- 
cumulates on submerged logs and drift 
material. I do not know just how they 
produce the sound. I have watched them 
while feeding and they seemed to attach 
the circular rim of their mouth to an object 
and then with a quick movement remove 
it. I am of the opinion that they attach their 
mouth to the object, and by producing a 



partial vacuum by suction remove the 
food and at the same time produce the 
sound referred to. 

Ira Lamb, Atkinson, Neb. 

The drumming or thumping noise heard 
by Mr. Covert was made by fish, sucking. 
A number of fishes make this noise, name- 
ly: the buffalo fish, the quillback or bony 
carp, the German carp, the redhorse and 
the different varieties of suckers. While 
buffalo fish and German carp suck almost 
exclusively in foam and drifted sediment, 
the redhorse, quillback or bony carp, and 
all the various tribes of the sucker species 
suck on logs, fallen trees, etc. ; in fact, on 
any bulky article suspended in the water, 
on the bottoms of boats, etc. The sounds 
are easily distinguishable, the foam suckers 
making a nois somewhat, resembling that 
made by a hog drinking swill, while the log 
or timber suckers make a distinct crack- 
ing, or thumping, noise. The redhorse 
makes a great deal more noise than any 
other kind of fish. He can be heard on 
still nights a distance of 200 to 300 yards 
along the river. 

T. H. McKinley, Wheatland, Ind. 

Say to Mr. T. F. Covert that the mysteri- 
ous sound he heard was a sucker, feeding. 
Some years ago I was fishing in the Au- 
glaize river, near where a log had lodged, 
above which a lot of drift had gathered, 
consisting of small pieces of bark, sticks, 
rotten wood, leaves and foam. Hearing 
that peculiar sound I soon located it and 
noticed that small particles of drift and 
foam about 2 or 3 inches square, rose each 
time. While I was watching, a neighbor 
came along with a gun and I called his at- 
tention to the disturbance. He was as 
much puzzled as I was. After watching it 
for some time he concluded he would try 
his rifle. He took careful aim and fired. 
In a few moments a large sucker floated 
out, with part of his head gone. If the 
listener is close he will notice a peculiar 
sucking sound accompaning the tapping Mr. 
Covert describes. 

D. W., Delphos, Ohio. 

I have often heard the sound described 
by Mr. Covert, when fishing for bass, 
which, by the way, is usually after dark, 
when the water is smooth and no noise is 
heard except what is made in the canoe. 
In paddling along by a lily bed I once heard 
the sucking, or picking, sound he said came 
from the drift stuff under the uprooted 
tree, and on investigating with a lantern I 
found that the noise was made by a black 
bass, with his nose just out of water, suck- 
ing flies off the edge of the leaves. When 
I hear that "gnashing of teeth" I forthwith 
send my white miller on its mission of al- 
lurement and am usually rewarded by a 
click, click, that sends a thrill along my 



56 



RECREATION. 



spine, even to-day when the ice is on all. 
the waters. 

E. C. Frost, South Framingham, Mass. 

There are 4 kinds of fishes that make the 
same noise as a woodpecker, namely, the 
sucker, the redhorse, the carp and the buffa- 
lo. They get under a boom, bark, a barge, 
etc., and cause the noise by sucking. How- 
ever, I have noticed that their tappings are 
slower than a woodpecker's. That is one 
way these fishes feed. I ljave had a 
good chance to know as I have seen them 
with half their bodies out under a house- 
boat and have heard the constant tap- 
ping. Some old rivermen claim they 
even pull the calking out of barges. 

Albert Roberge, San Francisco, Cal. 

In answer to Mr. Covert, in March Rec- 
reation, I have heard that peculiar sound 
he speaks of. and have always found it to 
be made by the fish called sucker. If Mr. 
Covert were here and would take a run 
over the logs stored in the different bays 
on Black river he would find many oppor- 
tunities to see and hear for himself. He 
would see suckers swimming alongside a log 
striking it with their mouth, thus produc- 
ing the sound he spoke of. They swim on 
their sides while feeding among logs, and 
on their backs under driftwood. 

Frank Schaller, La Crosse, Wis. 

I used to fish a great deal and one day 
I was attracted by the same kind of noise 
described by Mr. T. F. Covert in March 
Recreation. I investigated and found the 
noise came from just such a place as he 
describes. I watched a while and then 
dropping my baited hook where I saw the 
disturbance, I pulled out a large sucker. 
Whenever I saw a similar agitation 
going on thereafter I dropped my hook and 
pulled out another sucker. In time I caught 
9. I have seen the same thing a great 
many times since. 

N. H. Uttie, Elmwood, Wis. 

The peculiar noise Mr. T. F. Covert 
heard under the foam, dirt, etc., in Little 
Beaver creek was caused by the common 
sucker. While I do not favor shooting fish, 
if Mr. Covert will take his gun next sum- 
mer and shoot at the place where the move- 
ment of foam and the noise are I think he 
will get a sucker. I do not know why 
suckers do this, but think they are feeding. 
I find the noise they make is similar to 
that made by placing the tongue to the 
roof of the mouth and removing it forcibly. 
J. Drueg, Elgin, Minn. 

The sound referred to by Mr. T. F. 
Covert in March Recreation was proba- 
bly made by a turtle of some kind. I have 
several times heard similar sounds near old 
logs or where drift had collected and, on 
investigating, I have found one or more 



snapping turtles (Emysaurus serpentina) 
frolicking around and feasting on the in- 
sects which gather about such places. 

C. C. Manley, Milton, Vt. 

In March Recreation Mr. T. F. Covert 
says he would like to know the cause of the 
pecking he heard while fishing. I have 
had similar experience and on investigating 
I found it to be the work of squirrels. Have 
since been told it was so. It attracted my 
attention while camping last summer and I, 
like Mr. Covert, thought it was a wood- 
pecker. F. B. T., Syracuse, N. Y. 

In regard to the tapping described by Mr. 
T. F. Covert, I have heard a sound similar 
to it and on investigation I have found it 
was made by turtles, feeding. They swim 
under moss, weeds, or such debris as Mr. 
Covert describes, with just the end of nose 
out of water, and snap at bugs, flies, etc., 
with a decided snapping sound. 

Geo. E. Blackford, Algona, Iowa. 

The noise Mr. Covert heard was made by 
German carp sucking the scum on top of 
the water and around logs, driftwood,, etc. 
1 have speared them in the act and have 
dropped a hook in their mouths. If Mr. 
Covert will be quiet while watching them 
he will often see their round yellow mouths 
taking the scum. 

F. D. Gardner, Brodhead, Wis. 

If Mr. T. F. Covert will watch closely the 
next time he goes near that driftwood I 
think he will find that the tapping sound 
he mentions is made by suckers or red- 
horse feeding on the old driftwood. 

I. N. Hardy, Central City, Colo. 

Say to Mr. T. F. Covert that those 
strange sounds he heard while fishing in 
Little Beaver creek are caused by suckers 
feeding on the moss and sediment that ad- 
here to the drift. 

Levi Ballard, Paonia, Colo. 

The noise that mystified Mr. Covert was 
made by a fish of the sucker variety. 

J. L. Whinery, Marshalltown, Iowa. 



MURDEROUS CROWS. 
In February Recreation someone asks if 
any reader knows the habits of crows. In 
Indiana we have many crows. I am not a 
friend of the black thief, as we call them, 
because^ they steal the bait that we use to 
trap minks and skunks. Crows are wise 
and cunning. They are fond of young 
squirrels, birds and rabbits. I was brought 
up on a farm near heavy woods, where I 
could learn the habits of crows. I have 
seen an old female crow find a squirrel's 
nest with the young in it and catch 
them. She would stick her head in 
the nest, take them out, and feed 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



$7 



them to her young crows. I have seen a 
crow find a young bird on the ground, that 
was unable to fly, kill it, carry it off 
somew+iere and eat it. I have also found 
old rabbits that had been killed by crows. 
I once tracked a rabbit out in a stubble field 
and found where it had made a place in a 
bunch of grass to sit in through the day. 
Later the same rabbit was caught and killed 
by crows, and all that was left were the 
bones to tell the story of Mister Rabbit. I 
have found many such cases in hunting 
rabbits. ' 

H. C. Beahler, Rosland, 111. 



having been published in several standard 
works on natural history. 

T. Barbour, New York City. 



BREEDING FUR-BEARERS. 
Can beaver, otter, marten, fisher and 
mink be bred in captivity? Would I be 
successful if I should corral about 500 
acres, with creek running through the 
tract from a neighboring lake, put each 
species in a separate enclosure, so each 
would # have a share of the creek, and give 
them their liberty? Would you advise me 
to©keep the males from all the above or 
from any one of them? If I kill off 2-3 of 
the males each year would it be safe to let 
the remainder run at large among the fe- 
males? 

H. F. Shipley, Storlie, N. D. 

ANSWER. 

The animals named can be bred in cap- 
tivity; but no man has yet found a way to 
breed them at a profit. Not being a 
prophet, I can not say whether you would 
be successful or not in attempting to breed 
fur-bearing animals on a tract of 500 acres. 
The only way to find out is to try it. Dur- 
ing the season of bearing and rearing young 
the females should be kept separate from 
the males. At other times there would be 
no danger in allowing the 2 sexes to run 
together. — Editor. 



FLIGHTS OF SNOWY OWLS. 
I saw in April Recreation a query from 
F. S. W., Elk Rapids, Mich., about the oc- 
currence of the flights of Arctic, or snowy, 
owls. These flights are probably due to 
storms of especial severity in the Northern 
regions. About 5 years ago a number of 
these owls were taken along the Hudson 
river and in the Northern part of this 
State and New Jersey. Some of these 
owls were said to fish in the Hudson river, 
diving for their prey like the osprey. This 
year the birds appear remarkably numer- 
ous. The New York Zoological Society 
has received specimens from Minnesota 
and Long Island to the number of 10. 
Probably the most remarkable flight on rec- 
ord was about 1850, when some 60 of these 
birds were said to have rested in the rig- 
ging of a ship in the North Atlantic ocean. 
This story I have on good authority, it 



RODENTS EAT SHED HORNS. 

The inquiry in March Recreation by E. 
E. Mtinn regarding deer horns called to 
my mind several things I have noticed. 
In the spring of 1880 I passed through 
a grove of juniper and mahogany 
trees covering about 20 acres, that 
had been the winter quarters of a 
bunch of mule deer. At that time I saw 
at least 30 pairs of horns. A few years 
later I passed over the same ground, and 
was surprised to find only 2 or 3 horns, 
and they were almost entirely eaten by 
rodents. Since then I have noticed that a 
pair of horns left in the woods will be 
eaten in a short time. As deer are less 
numerous in this locality than they were 
a few years ago, it is hard to find any horns 
in the woods that have lain there longer 
than a year. I saw one deer killed in No- 
vember with horns still in the velvet, and 
have seen a few deer carrying their old 
horns in April. 

S. R. O., Klamath Agency, Oregon. 



NATURAL HISTORY NOTES. 

One day about noon I saw a peculiar 
object floating in the air a short distance 
away. It proved a large spider web, much 
resembling a parachute. About 3 feet be- 
low it was a spider, suspended by threads 
from the main body, which was about 2 
feet across. I followed it on a run for 
over half a mile, but it kept above my 
reach, sometimes only a few feet, and at 
others fully 50. Finally at the top of a 
hill overlooking the Chemung river at 
least 150 feet, I lost sight of the little ad- 
venturer and his balloon, as he floated out 
over the valley. If others of your readers 
have seen spider balloonists I should be 
glad to hear of it. 

J. B. Bray, Waverly, N. Y. 



Chicago. — The Illinois Audubon society is go- 
ing to strike a blow at the root of the fashion 
of wearing sea gulls and terns for hat decorations. 
The society has decided that moral suasion with 
the women is not effective, and that the people 
to get after are the dealers. Every millinery 
house in Chicago, wholesale and retail, is to be 
served with a notice that the selling of skins of 
gulls, terns and song birds is illegal under the law 
of Illinois. The name of each bird which it is 
forbidden to buy or sell will be given, in order 
that ignorance can not be pleaded as an excuse 
for law violation. A committee chosen by the 
directors of the society will visit the retail milli- 
ners, and after an inspection of the stocks will 
point out to responsible persons the birds which 
it is unlawful for them to sell. The committee 
will then request that the prohibited bird skins 
be returned to the supply house from which they 
were bought. If the merchants agree to do this 
they will avert prosecution. — Exchange. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



OFFICERS OF THE L. A. S. 

President, G. O. Shields, 23 W. 24th St., New 
York. 

1st Vice President, E. T. Seton, 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. Hornaday, 2969 
Decatur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President, Dr. T. S. Palmer, Dept. of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 6 East 
38th St., New York. 

5th Vice-President, Hon. W.A.Richards, Gen- 
eral Land Office, Washington, D. C. 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington Ave., 
Passaic, N. J. 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin, of the Corbin Bank- 
ing Co., 192 Broadway, New York City. 



ARIZONA DIVISION. 
M.J.Foley. Chief Warden, Jerome. 
ARKANSAS DIVISION. 
W. R. Blockson, Chief Warden, Mena. 

CALIFORNIA DIVISION. 
Dr. David Starr Jordan, Chief Warden, Leland 
Stanford University. C. Barlow, Secy.-Treas., Santa 
Clara. 

COLORADO DIVISION. 
A. Whitehead, Chief Warden, 303 Tabor Building, 
Denver. 

CONNECTICUT DIVISION. 
Hon. F. P. Sherwood, Chief Warden, Southport; 
Dr. H. L. Ross, Vice-Warden, Canaan; H. C. Went, 
Sec-Treas., Bridgeport. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DIVISION. 
C. H.Townsend, Chief Warden, U. S. Fish Com- 
mission. 

FLORIDA DIVISION. 
Frank Clarkson, Chief Warden, Jacksonville. 

GEORGIA DIVISON. 
J. J. Doughty, Chief Warden, Augusta. 

IDAHO DIVISION. 
Hon. T. W. Bartley, Chief Warden, Moscow. 

ILLINOIS DIVISION. 
W.T. Jefferson, Chief Warden, Plymouth Building, 
Chicago; F. M. Taber. Vice Warden, 144 Kinzie 
St., Chicago; G. C. Davis, Sec-Treas., 123 S. Central 
Ave., Austin. 

INDIANA DIVISION. 
Frank L. Littleton, Chief Warden, 30^ East 
Washington St., Indianapolis J. J. Hildebrandt, 
Vice Warden, Logansport ; T. J. Carter, Sec-Treas., 
State House, Indianapolis. 

IOWA DIVISION. 
Carl Quimby, Chief Warden, Des Moines; C. C. 
Proper, Sec-Treas., Des Moines. 

KANSAS DIVISION. 
O. B. Stocker, Chief Warden, Wichita; A. J. 
Applegate, Sec-Treas., 113 E. 1st St., Wichita. 

KENTUCKY DIVISION. 

Geo. C. Long, Chief Warden, Hopkinsville. 

MAINE DIVISION. 
Col. E. C. Farrington, Chief Warden, Augusta. 

MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION. 
Heman S. Fay, Chief Warden, Hazleton Block, 
Marlboro; J. E. Tweedy Vice Warden, North Attle- 
boro: A. C. Lamson, Sec-Treas., 194 Main St., 
Marlboro. 

MICHIGAN DIVISION. 
J . Elmer Pratt, Chief Warden, Grand Rapids ; R. S . 
Woodliffe, Vice Warden, Jackson ; A. B. Richmond, 
Sec-Treas., Grand Rapids. 



MINNESOTA DIVISION. 
Dietrich Lange, Chief Warden, 937 York St., St. 
Paul; H. A. Morgan, Vice-Warden, Albert Lea ; A. R. 
Bixby, Sec-Treas., 101 Baldwin St., St. Paul. 

MISSOURI DIVISION. 
Bryan Snyder, Chief Warden, 726 Central Bldg., 
St. Louis. 

MONTANA DIVISION. 
Professor M. J. Elrod, Chief Warden, Missoula; 
Sidney M Logan, Vice Warden, Kalispell ; R. A. 
Waagner, Sec-Treas., Bozeman. 

NEBRASKA DIVISION. 
Fred. E. Mockett, Chief Warden, Lincoln ; P. 
O'Mahony, Sec-Treas., Lincoln. 

NEVADA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. H. Cavell, Chief Warden, Carson. 
Geo. W. Cowing, Sec-Treas., Carson. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE DIVISION. 
CM. Brooks, Chief Warden, 105 West St., Keene, 
Sidney Conant, Sec-Treas., Keene. 

NEW JERSEY DIVISION. 
A. W. Van Saun, Chief Warden, Pompton Plains; 
Dr. W. S. Colfax, Vice Warden, Pompton Lakes ; I. 
V. Dorland, Sec-Treas., Arlington. 

NEW MEXICO DIVISION. 
W. P. Sanders, Chief Warden, Magdalena. 

NEW YORK DIVISION. 
John R. Fanning, Chief Warden, Powers' Bldg., 
Rochester; Col. R. E. Moss, Vice-Warden, Wallack's 
Theatre, New York City; Dr. C. C. Curtis, Sec- 
Treas., Columbia College, New York City. 

NORTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. D. Jones. Chief Warden, Devil's Lake. 

OHIO DIVISION. 
W. E. Gleason, Chief Warden, Mitchell Bids., 
Cincinnati ; A. C. Thatcher, Vice-Warden, Urbana. 

OKLAHOMA DIVISION. 
W. M. Grant, Chief Warden, Oklahoma City. 

ONTARIO DIVISION. 
C. A. Hammond, Chief Warden, Box 701, St. 
Thomas; D. L. Mells, Sec-Treas., St. Thomas. 
OREGON DIVISION. 
Robert F. Kelly, Chief Warden, Box 188, The 
Dalles; C. B. Cushing, Sec-Treas., The Dalles. 
PENNSYLVANIA DIVISION. 
C. F. Emerson, Chief Warden, 189 N. Perry St., 
Titusville; Hon. C. B. Penrose, Vice-Warden, 1720 
Spruce St., Philadelphia; E. Wager-Smith, Sec- 
Treas., 1026 Ridge Ave., Philadelphia. 

RHODE ISLAND DIVISION: 
Zenas W. Bliss, Chief Warde:i, 49 Westminster St., 
Providence. 

SOUTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 
Burdett Moody, Chief Warden, Lead; John C. 
Barber, Sec-Treas., Lead. 

TENNESSEE DIVISION. 
Hon. G. C. Martin, Chief Warden, Clarksville; 
Hon. Austin Peay, Jr., Sec-Treas., Clarksville. 
TEXAS DIVISION. 
Prof. S. W. Stanfield, Chief Warden, San Marcos; 
W. E. Heald, Sec-Treas., San Angelo. 
UTAH DIVISION. 
Hon. John Sharp, Chief Warden, Salt Lake City. 

VERMONT DIVISION. 
W. E. Mack, Chief Warden, Woodstock; S. C. 
White, Sec-Treas., Woodstock. 

VIRGINIA DIVISION. 
Franklin Stearns, Chief Warden, n, N. nth St., 
C. O. Saville, Vice Warden, Richmond; M. D. Hart, 
Sec-Treas., 1217 East Main St., Richmond. 
WASHINGTON DIVISION. 
F. S. Merrill, Chief Warden, Spokane : F.A.Pon- 
tius, Sec-Treas., Seattle; Munro Wyckon", Vice War- 
den, Pt. Townsend. 



S8 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



59 



WEST VIRGINIA DIVISION. 
J. M. Lashley, Chief Warden, Davis. 
WISCONSIN DIVISION. 
James T. Drought, Chief Warden, Milwaukee; Dr. 
A. Gropper, Sec.-JL'reas., Milwaukee. 
WYOMING DIVISION. 
H. E. Wadsworth, Chief Warden, Lander; Frank 
Bond, Sec.-Treas., Cheyenne. 

Applications for membership and orders for badges 
should be addressed to Arthur F. Rice, Secretary, 23 IV. 
24th St., New York. 



LOCAL WARDENS 
County. 
New York, 
Livingston 

Nassau, 

Albany, 



Broome, 

Cayuga, 
Chemung, 

Cortland, 
Erie, 



IN NEW YORK. 
Name of Warden. Address. 

Conrad L. Meyer, 46 W. Broadway. 
M. De La Vergne, Lakeville. 
K.S. Chamberlain, Mt. Morris. 
Willett Smith, Freeport, L. I. 

C. D. Johnson, Newtonville. 
Henry T.Newman, Albany. 
John Sullivan, Sanitaria Springs 
R. R. Mathewson, Binghamton. 



H. M. Haskell, 
Fred. Uhle, 
M. A. Baker, 
James Edwards, 
E. P. Dorr, 



Weedsport. 
Hendy Creek, 
Elmira. 
Cortland, 

103 D. S. Morgan 
Building, Buffalo. 
Morilla. 
Moriah. 
St. Regis Falls. 
McColloms. 



" Marvin H. Butler, 

Essex, W. H. Broughton, 

Franklin, Jas. Eccles, 

W.J. Martin, 
Montgomery, Charles \V Scharf, Canajoharie. 
Oneida, J. M. Scoville, Clinton. 

Orange, Wilson Crans, Middletown. 

J. Hampton Kidd, Newburgh. 
Richmond, Lewis Morris, Port Richmond 

St. Lawrence, Dr. B.W. Severance, Gouverneur. 



Schenectady, 
Suffolk, 

Tioga, 
Washington, 



Westchester, 



Essex, 

Dutchess, 

Columbia, 

Orange, 

Onondaga, 

Yates, 

Dutchess, 

Queens, 



Ulster, 

Jefferson, 
11 

Herkimer, 

Oswego, 

Putnam, 

Schuyler, 

Allegany, 

Schoharie, 

Warren, 

Orleans Co., 



A.N. Clark, 
J. W. Furnside, 
F. J. Fellows, 
P. F. Tabor, 
Geo. Wooa, 
C.L.Allen, 
A. S. Temple, 
J. E Barber, 
George Poth, 
Chas. Seacor, 

E.G. Horton, 
H. E. Braman, 

A. B. Miller, 

Thomas Harris, 
James Lush, 

B. L. Wren, 
Symour Poineer, 

Chas. H. DeLong, 
Jacob Tompkins, 



Sevey. 

Schenectady. 

Central Islip, L. I. 

Orient, L. I. 

Owego. 

Sandy Hill. 

Whitehall. 

Dresden. 

Pleasantville. 

57 Pelham Road 

New Rochelle. 
Pleasantville. 
Keene Valley. 

Jackson's Corners. 

Port Jervis. 
Memphis. 
Penn Van. 
Branch Port. 
Pawling. 
Billings. 



Gerard Van Nostrand, Flushing, L. I . 
W. S. Mygrant, 46 Elton Street, 



P. A. Geepel, 

L. B. Drowne, 

M. A. DeVall, 
Wm. S. Mead, 
C. E. Van Order, 

C. I. Smith, 

D. F. Sperry, 
J. E. Manning, 
H. L. Brady, 
G. C Fordham, 
G. A. Thomas, 
O. E. Eigen, 
Geo. McEchron, 
J.H. Fearby, 



Brooklyn. 
473 Grand Ave., 

Astoria, L. I. 
119 Somers Street. 

Brooklyn. 
The Corners. 
Woodstock. 
Watertown. 

41 

Old Forge. 
154 West Utica St. 
Mahopac Falls. 
Watkins. 
Belvidere. 
Sharon Springs. 
Glen Falls. 
E. Shelby. 



Stark, 
Franklin, 

Cuyahoga, 

Clark, 

Erie, 

Fulton, 



LOCAL WARDENS IN OHIO. 



A. Dangeleisen, 
Brook L. Terry, 

A. W. Hitch, 

Fred C. Ross, 

David Sutton, 

L. C Berry, 



Massillon. 

208 Woodward Av., 

Columbus. 
161 Osborn St., 

Cleveland. 
169 W. Main St., 

Springfield. 
418 Jackson St., 

Sandusky. 
Swanton. 



County. 

Allen, 

Hamilton, 

Knox, 

Lorain, 

Ottawa, 

Muskingum, 

Scioto, 

Highland, 

LOCAL 
Fairfield, 



Fairfield, 
Litchfield, 

Middlesex, 
New Haven, 



LOCAL 
Norfolk, 

it 

Suffolk, 



Address. 
Lima. 
4465 Eastern Ave., 

Cincinnati. 
Mt. Vernon. 
Elyria. 
Lakeside. 
Zanesville. 
Portsmouth. 
Hillsboro. 
CONNECTICUT. 

2 Park Row, Stam- 
ford, Ct. 
11 Park St., Bridge- 
port, Ct. 
Box 373, htratford. 
P. O. Box 100, Ca- 
naan, Ct. 
Sandford Brainerd, Ivorvton. 
Wilbur E. Beach, 31-8 Chapel Street, 
New Haven, Ct. 
D. J. Ryan, 188 Elizabeth St., 

Derby. 
WARDENS IN MASSACHUSETTS. 
Orlando McKenzie, Norfolk. 
J.J. Blick, Wrentham. 

S. W. Fuller, East Milton. 

Capt. W. J. Stone. 4 Tremont Row, 
Boston. 



Name of Warden. 
S. W. Knisely, 
W. C Rippey, 

Grant Phillips, 
T.J. Bates, 
Frank B. Shirley, 
Frank 1). Abell, 
J. F. Kelley, 
lames G. Lyle, 
WARDENS IN 
George B. Bliss. 

Harvey C Went, 

Samuel Waklee, 
Dr. H. L. Ross, 



LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW JERSEY 



Mercer, 

Mercer, 
ii 

Morris, 



Somerset, 

Sussex, 

Union, 

Warren, 

Monmouth. 
Hudson, 

LOCAL 
Jefferson, 
Perry, 
Warren. 

Juniata, 

Venango, 
Potter 



Crawford, 



Cambria, 

Butler, 

Allegheny, 

Beaver, 

McKean, 



Lack, 
Carbon, 
Cumberland, 
Wyoming, 

Tioga, 

41 

Lycoming, 

Delaware, 
Montgomery, 
Bradford, 
Clarion, 
Cameron, 
Clinton, 
Northumber- 
land, 
Elk, 



Jos. Ashmore, 
Edw. Vanderbilt, 
Roland Mitchell, 



124 Taylor St., 

Trenton 

Dentzville, 

Trenton. 

739 Centre St., 

Trenton. 

Pompton Plains. 

Dover. 

Butler. 

Hibernia. 

Somerville. 



Joseph Pellet, 

Chas. W. Blake, 

Francis E. Cook, 

Calone Orr, 

G. E. Morris, 

Isaac D. Williams, Branchville. 

A. H. Miller, Cranford. 

C. M. Hawkins, Roselle. 

Dory-Hunt, Wanague. 

A. W. Letts, 51 Newark St.. 

Hoboken 
WARDENS IN PENNSYLVANIA. 



John Noll, 
Samuel Sundy, 

F. P. Sweet, 
Nelson Holmes, 
Clifford Singer, 
Ezra Phillips, 

G. D. Benedict, 
Ira Murphy, 
Wiley Barrows, 
Chas. Barrows, 
Jasper Tillotson, 
Geo. T. Meyers, 
J. B. Lamb, 
W.H.Lambert, 



Sykesville. 
Lebo. 

Goodwill Hill. 
Cornplanter. 
Oakland Mills. 
McAlesterville. 
Pleasantville. 
Coudersport. 
Austin. 
Austin. 
Tillotson. 

Titusville. 
Buel. 

720 Coleman Ave., 
Johnstown. 

Murrinsville. 

Natrona. 

Beaver Falls. 



F. J. Forquer, 
S. H. Allen, 
N. H. Covert, 
W. R. Keefer, 
C. A. Duke, 
L. P. Fessenden, 
Wm. Holsinger, 
Wm. Weir, 
AsaD. Hontz, 
J. C. Gill, 
Cyrus Walter, 
E. B. Beaumont, Jr., 
G. H. Simmons, 
Jas. J. Brennan, 
B. D. Kurtz, 
Walter Lusson, 
L.C. Parsons. 
Geo. B. Loop, 
Isaac Keener, 

Harry Hemphill, Emporium. 
M. C. Kepler, Renovo. 
(G. W. Roher, 

I 505 Anthracite St., Shamokin. 

D. R. Lobaugh, Ridgway, 



Duke Center. 

Granere. 

Stickney. 

Moosic. 

East Mauch Chunk. 

Mechanicsburg. 

Tunkhannock. 

Lawrenceville. 

Westfield. 
Oval. 
Cammal. 
Ardmore. 
Academy. 
Sayre. 
New Bethlehem. 



6o 



RECREATION. 



LOCAL WARDENS IN MICHIGAN. 
County. Name of Warden. Address. 

Ottawa, W. H. Dunham, Drenthe. 

Kalamazoo, C. E. Miller, Augusta. 

Berrien, W. A. Palmer, Buchanan. 

Cass, Thomas Dewey, Dowagiac. 

Hillsdale, C. A. Stone, Hillsdale.- 

LOCAL WARDENS IN VIRGINIA. 
Mecklenburg, J.H.Ogburn, South Hill. 

King William, N.H.Montague, Palls. 
Smythe, J. M. Hughes, Chatham Hill. 

King & Queen, R. D. Bates, Newtown. 

Louisa, J. P. Harris, Applegrove. 

Henrico, W. J. Lynham, 412 W. Marshall 

Richmond. 
East Rockingham, EJ.Carickhoff, Harrisonburg. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WYOMING. 
Fremont, Nelson Yarnall, Dubois. 

U^a, {l'1-.^son, }J"*»»- 

Carbon, Kirk Dyer, Medicine Bow. 

Laramie, Martin Breither, Cheyenne. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN TENNESSEE. 
Sumner, W. G. Harris, Gallatin. 

Stewart, I onn H. Lory, Bear Spring. 

Robertson, C. C. Bell, Springfield. 

Montgomery, P. W. Humphrey, Clarksviile. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEBRASKA. 
Hall, E. C. Statler, Grand Island 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Cheshire, S. C. Ellis, Keene. 

Sullivan, G. A. Blake, Lempster. 

" J. W. Davidson, Charlestown. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN VERMONT. 
Rutland, Wm. J. Liddle, Box 281, Fair Haven 

Windsor, F. A. Tarbell, West Bridgewater. 

Orleans, E.G.Moulton, Derby Line. 

Essex, H. S. Lund, Granby. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN ILLINOIS. 
Rock Island, D. M. Slottard, 12th Ave and 17th 

St.. Moline. 
Iroquois, J. L. Peacock, Sheldon. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN OKLAHOMA. 
Kiowa and Comanche Nation, 

A.C.Cooper, Ft. Sill. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN IOWA. 
Clinton, D. L. Pascol, Grand Mound. 

Pattawattamie, Dr. C. Engel, Crescent. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WASHINGTON. 
Okanogan, James West, Methow. 

Stevens Co., Jacob Martin, Newport. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN UTAH. 
Washington, S. C. Goddard, New Harmony. 

LOCAL CHAPTERS. 
Albert Lea, Minn., H. A. Morgan, Rear Warden. 
Angelica, N. Y., C. A. Lathrop, 
Augusta, Mont., H.Sherman, 
Austin, Minn., G. F. Baird, 

Austin, Pa., W.S.Warner, 

Boston, Mass., Capt. W. I. Stone, 

Buffalo, N.Y., H.C.Gardiner, 

Cammal, Pa., B. A. Ovenshire. 

Charlestown, N. H., W. M. Buswell, 
Cheyenne, Wyo., J. Hennessy, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, B.W.Morris, " 

Coudersport, Pa., 1. L. Murphy, 
Cresco, Iowa., J, L. Piatt, 

Davis, W.Va., J. Heltzen, " 

Dowagiac, Mich., W.F. Hoyt, " 

East Mauch Chunk,Pa., E. F. Pry, 
Evansville, Ind., F. M. Gilbert, 
Fontanet, Ind., W.H.Perry, 

Ft. Wayne, Ind., W. L. Waltemarth 
Great Falls, Mont., J. M. Gaunt, 
Heron Lake, Minn., K. C. Buckeye, 
Hollidaysb'g, Pa., H. D. Hewit, 
Hopkinsville, Ky„ Hunter Wood, 
Indianapolis, Ind., Joseph E. Bell, 
Jerome, Ariz., Dr. L. A. Hawkins, " 

Johnsonburg, Pa., W. J. Stebbins, 
Kalispell, Mont., Tohn Eakright, 
Keene, N. H., F. P. Beedle, 

Kingfisher, Okla., A. C . Ambrose, 



Lake Co., Ind., Dr. R. C. Mackey, Rear Warden. 
Loganpsort,Ind., E. B. McConnell, " 

Ludmgton, Mich., G. R. Cartier, " 

Mechanicsburg, Pa., Dr. J H. Swartz, " 

Minturn, Colo., A. B. Walter, " 

New Albany, Ind., Dr. J. F. Weathers, " 
New Bethlehem, Pa., Isaac Keener, " 

Penn Yan, N. Y., Dr. H. R. Phillips, 
Princeton, Ind., H. A. Y eager, " 

Reynoldsville, Pa., C. F. Hoffman, 
Ridgway, Pa., T. J. Maxwell, " 

Rochester, N. Y., C. H. McChesney 
St. Paul, Minn., O. T. Denny, 
St. Thomas, Ont., L. J. Hall, 
Schenectady, N. Y, J. W. Furnside. " 

Seattle, Wash., M. Kelly, 

C. C. Truesdell, " 

C. F. Thiede, 

C. B. Cushine, " 

J.R.Hays, 

Gerald Volk, 

C. M. Morse, 



Syracuse, N. Y., 
Terre Haute, Ind., 
The Dalles, Ore., 
V/alden, N. Y., 
Wichita, Kas., 
Winona, Minn., 



DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 
members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 
per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought 
of them. In ordering please give L. A. S. 
number: 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 
Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 

guns, rifles. 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 

goods. 
Blair Camera Co., Rochester, N.Y. Photographic goods. 
The Bostwick Gun and Sporting Goods Co., 152& 

Arapahoe St., Denver, Col. 
James Acheson, Talbot St., St. Thomas, Ontario, 

Sporting goods. 
Jespersen & Hines, 10 Park Place, New York City. 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 

W. D. Ellis, 136 W. 72& street, New York City. 
A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington avenue, Passaic, N. J. 
Dr. W. A. Valentine, 5 W. 35th street, New York 

City. 
A. A. Anderson, 6 E. 38th street, New York City. 
A. V. Fraser, 478 Greenwich street, New York 

City. 

E. S. Towne, care National Bank Book Co., Hol- 

yoke, Mass. 

F. G. Miller, 108 Clinton street, Defiance, Ohio. 
Gen. J. F. Pierson, 20 W. 526. street, New York 

City. 
E. T. Seton, 80 W. 40th street, New York City. 
J. H. Seymour, 35 Wall street. New York City. 
A. G. Nesbitt, Maple street, Kingston, Pa. 
D. C. Beard, 204 Amity street, Flushing, L. I. 

C. H. Ferry, 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Hon. Levi P. Morton, 681 5th avenue, New York 

City. 
H. Williams, P. O. Box 156, Butte, Mont. 

D. B. Fearing, Newport, R. I. 

E. H. Dickinson, Moosehead Lake, Me. 
Lorenzo Blackstone, Norwich, Conn. 

A. L. Prescott, 90 W. Broadway, New York City. 

G. S. Edgell, 192 Broadway, -New York City. 
W. B. Mershon, Saginaw, Mich. 

Hon. H. W. Carey, East Lake, Mich. 
George Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 
Andrew Carnegie, 2nd, Fernandina, Fla. 
Morris Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 
W. L. Underwood, 52 Fulton street, Boston, Mass. 
C. E. Butler, Jerome, Ariz. 
Mansfield Ferry, 183 Lincoln Park, Boulevard, 

Chicago, 111. 
Austin Corbin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
J. Stanford Brown, 241 South 5th street, Reading, Pa. 
W. H. Smith, Bryn, Mawr, Pa. 
E. B. Smith, Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

There are thousands of men in the 
United States who should be life mem- 
bers. Why don't they join? Will some- 
one please take a club and wake them up? 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



6l 



SENATOR HOAR WORKS WITH US. 



Editor Recreation : 



Washington, D. C. 



has done in our behalf and in behalf of the 
wild creatures he so dearly loves. — Editor. 



I have your letter transmitting to me 
copies of 6 resolutions adopted by the 
League of American Sportsmen at its an- 
nual meeting, and I have given them my 
careful attention. I shall do my best to 
comply with the desire of your League that 
the destruction of our wild animals, such 
as elk, moose, buffalo and antelope, be pre- 
vented. I shall also do my best to prevent 
their destruction, extermination and slaugh- 
ter by leagues of sportsmen. I have 
no respect whatever for the pursuit of 
birds, and gentle, harmless wild creatures, 
like deer and antelope, as they strive to 
escape their oersecutors, with broken wings 
and legs, hunted with dogs, and tortured 
with deadly fear, which, I suppose, is the 
crudest torture of which animal nature is 
capable. I hope that the animals will not 
be suppressed and that the sportsmen will. 

Geo. F. Hoar. 

The resolutions which Senator Hoar re- 
fers to were printed in April Recrea- 
tion, so that my readers are already famil-. 
iar with them. Senator Hoar is well 
known to all reading Americans as a staunch 
friend of the birds and wild animals. His 
objections to the methods of sportsmen are 
well taken, and his opoosition to the kill- 
ing of birds and animals under the name of 
sport is shared by many thousands of good 
people. I, however, recognize the fact that 
it is impossible to abolish the use of fire- 
arms as an adjunct of outdoor recreation. 
It is impossible to entirely stop the killing 
of birds and animals as an adjunct of 
sport. We have greatly reduced the kill- 
ing, and that is what the League of Ameri- 
can Sportsmen was organized for. We 
have almost totally wiped out the brutal 
side hunt which prevailed so generally up 
to a few years ago. We have nearly 
stopped the sale of game. We have abol- 
ished the millinery traffic in the plumage 
of song and insectivorous birds. We have 
shortened the season of killing in nearly 
all the States, and have, in many States, 
limited the number of birds and animals 
which any man may kill in a 'day. There- 
fore the venerable Massachusetts Senator 
must agree that the League has done a 
great work, and thus far must approve it. 
In fact, he has told me in private conversa- 
tion that he does approve it. We are in- 
debted to him for supporting nearly every 
measure which the League has put forward 
for the protection of birds and wild ani- 
mals ; and while we can not agree with his 
radical views as to prohibiting all killing, 
we value him and honor him for what he 



WHAT A MONTANA MAN SAYS OF THE 
ANNUAL MEETING. 

J. M. Gaunt has returned from Indianapolis, 
where he represented Montana at the annual con- 
vention of the League of American Sportsmen. 
Mr. Gaunt reports a most enjoyable trip and 
session of the League, and returns a much more 
enthusiastic member of the League than ever 
before. 

"Although I have been a member of the 
League several years," he said, "I never before 
realized how great and powerful an organization 
it is. It has had a remarkable growth in mem- 
bership in the past year and it is a great power 
in shaping needed legislation for the protection 
of game of all kinds, song birds, and insectivor- 
ous birds. 

"The matters of probably the greatest interest 
to Montana sportsmen on which the League took 
action were concerning the deportation of the 
Cree Indians to their native land, Canada, the 
project of making all forest reservations game 
preserves, and the adoption of a resolution, call- 
ing on the Indian department to direct that no 
Indian shall be permitted to leave a reservation 
bearing arms. 

"One of the most interesting features of the 
meeting was the reports of progress made in the 
enforcement of the Lacey game law. Dr. Palmer, 
who is in charge of this enforcement, requests 
all sportsmen to notify him by telegraph of any 
violation of the law,, and on receipt of such 
notice he immediately instructs, the United States 
marshal who can most easily do so to confiscate 
the game illegally killed, shipped or stored, and 
to arrest those violating the law. 

"Action of the League that was particularly 
gratifying to the Western delegates was the de- 
cision 'that the next meeting, to be held next 
February, shall be in St. Paul. Each year the 
meeting place is moving Westward, and we may 
in time get it to Montana. — Great Falls, Mont., 
Tribune. 

I am sending out from my home 40 or 50 
circular letters to my sportsmen friends in 
able replies to some of them. I expect to 
have the application of our representative 
in the State Legislature, Mr. Hagenbuch, 
in a day or 2. We intend if possible to 
enroll 200 names in this county. We have 
set our mark high, but we want to make 
this the best protected county in the United 
States. Mr. Gleason will help us. 

A. C. Thatcher, Urbana, Ohio. 



THE LEAGUE DID IT. 
There are a lot of pot hunters in John- 
sonburg, Pa., who for many years have 
held a side hunt about Thanksgiving time. 
Some months ago a good sportsman in that 
town stirred up others of his kind and sent 
in 41 applications for membership in the 
League. A local chapter was organized and 
League posters were put up throughout 
the county. League literature was liberally 
circulated among the pot hunters, and the 
result is that the customary Thanksgiving 
side hunt was cut out last year. Yet the 
editor of the A. D. G. H. predicted 4 years 
ago that this League would not "accomplish 
any important achievement." 



FORESTRY. 



EDITED BY DR. B. E. FERNOW, 
Director of the New York School of Forestry, Cornell University, assisted by Dr. John C. Gifford of the same 

institution. 

It takes thirty years to &row a tree and thirty minutes to cut it down and destroy it. 



THE FOREST, FISH AND GAME COMMISSION. 

The annual report for 1900 of the New 
York State Forest Commission was issued 
some time ago from the Government printer 
at Albany. The report of the Commission 
itself is brief, not quite 3 pages, 
but is supplemented by reports of the su- 
perintendent of forests, and a lengthy ex- 
tract from the report of the assistant 
superintendent. 

The matter of most interest in the Com- 
mission's report is its reference to "exten- 
sive experiments in tree planting, made by 
the Commission, which have shown that 
at a remarkably small expense these barren 
places can in time be replaced by a health- 
ful and valuable forest growth." 

Anyone consulting the reports of the 
superintendent of forests and of his as- 
sistant superintendent contained in the same 
volume, will smile at the basis for the 
statement of the Commission. For there 
we read, that the "extensive experiments" 
carried on by the Commission consisted in 
the planting in the Catskills of 6,000 little 
seedlings of pine and spruce, a gift of the 
New York State College of Forestry, which, 
with the greatest stretching, could not cover 
more than 4 acres of ground, and which 
were planted by the assistant superintend- 
ent and his assistant with a few friends at a 
"planting bee." 

No wonder that under such conditions, 
the plant material a present, the labor gra- 
tuitous, the expense was small. 

The College of Forestry has for 3 years 
been engaged in this kind of planting, has 
planted 150 acres of brush and waste land 
besides 105 acres of cut-over land, and set 
out altogether over 230,000 seedlings ; has 
large nurseries established to furnish the 
plant material and has sold to the Com- 
mission 420,000 seedlings to continue its ex- 
periments. The cost of planting seedlings 
can hardly be kept below $6 to $10 an acre, 
although by sowing the cost may be con- 
siderably reduced. 

The condemnation of the wood alcohol or 
acetic acid industry, which the Forest, Fish 
and Game Commission indulges in, while 
advocating the cutting of spruce for wood 
pulp, is, to say the least, inconsistent. If 
the industry is a nuisance, it will be proper 
to condemn it ; but to suppress it because it 
uses small hardwoods is peculiar. The 
wood alcohol manufacturer is to the hard- 
wood industry what the paper pulp 
manufacturer is to the softwood industry. 
Both use or can use small stuff, and it is the 



utilization of the small stuff resulting from 
cleanings and thinnings and limbage in gen- 
eral that makes forestry at all possible. 
The dry distillation of wood, which is also 
the modern method of charcoal manufac- 
ture, is an industry that needs encourage- 
ment and extension in proper direction. It 
does no injury to the forest; in fact, it is 
essential for the utilization of forest rub- 
bish. It is right to restrict all industries 
which are a nuisance and which actually 
do damage; but to single out the acid fac- 
tory, the necessary and highly utilitarian 
concomitant of the hardwood industry, 
is most erratic and unjust. To recommend 
the preservation of our forests for indus- 
trial purposes on one page and then to 
summarily condemn the manufacture of 
charcoal, wood alcohol, pyroligneous and 
acetic acid, etc., on another is a most in- 
consistent position. 

The Commission recommends in one 
place that "scientific conservative forestry" 
be applied to the Adirondack forest, and in 
another recommends the "prevention of the 
cutting of hardwoods for commercial pur- 
poses." If this is forestry, it would be 
as well to leave the constitutional amend- 
ment preventing all cutting just as it is, 
for an indefinite period of time. The prac- 
tice of forestry under such circumstances 
would be little better than poor lumbering, 
and worse than the let-alone policy which 
is now in force. It seems a pity, also, to 
prevent the cutting of hardwoods for 
"commercial purposes," and not for any 
other purpose, if there is any. 

Perhaps the Commission has overlooked 
the recommendations of the working plan of 
Township No. 40, made for the Commission 
by the Bureau of Forestry of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. This 
working plan recommends the cutting of 
softwoods down to certain diameter limits, 
for purposes of revenue making, but with 
silvicultural accompaniments. It also recom- 
mends the "utilization of all mature and 
defective hardwoods," whenever it can be 
done profitably, and suggests the construc- 
tion of a mill, a dam, a railroad and acid 
and other factories, if need be, to aid in 
the process of judicious utilization. In fact, 
the report concedes that the better prac- 
tice would be to remove the hardwoods 
first and the softwoods afterward. 

Well meaning people often shed tears 
needlessly over what appears to be denuda- 
tion. It is often a good plan to cut the 
forest and burn over the soil in places 



62 



FORESTRY. 



63 



where large masses of duff have accumu- 
lated. This duff, undecomposed, is me- 
chanically unable to start a healthy crop of 
coniferous seedlings. It is often necessary 
to expose the mineral soil to insure re- 
generation. It is only in particular por- 
tions, which are necessary for protective 
purposes, that this process of treatment 
would be detrimental, as on all the moun- 
tain tops, rough mountain sides and lake 
shores, which should perhaps be left un- 
touched. 

The truth of the whole matter is, appar- 
ently, that neither the Commission, the 
Legislature, nor the people of the State of 
New York know just what they want in 
reference to the Adirondacks, and the ad- 
vice of the Governor recommending caution 
until a definite policy can be evolved is 
good. Nothing is more detrimental to the 
practice of forestry than constant change 
and uncertainty. After a definite policy is 
once decided on, then the proper move 
would be to stick to it in spite of public 
opinion, and to take the money used in the 
publication of voluminous, beautifully illus- 
trated reports for the employment of a 
trained, well organized body of professional 
foresters, not merely natives of the region 
in which they are to work, to put this policy 
into execution, in spite of what hotel men, 
campers, guides, hunters or other individ- 
uals may think. The preserve belongs to 
the whole people of the State of New 
York, who have paid for it by taxation, 
and not to the few who live or go there. 



NEWSPAPER PAP. 

The New York Herald for Sunday, Feb- 
ruary 23, contained the following interest- 
ing note: 

"New York State has given deep offense 
to the Italians, and to persons of English 
birth living in this city, and it is said the 
matter has been, or will be, called to the 
attention of the 2 foreign governments. 
The offense was committed in the last re- 
port of the Fisheries, Game and Forest 
Commission. 

"In an article written by Dr. John Gif- 
ford on 'European Forest Scenes,' refer- 
ence is made to the science of forestry in 
various countries. The Italian residents 
of New York take great offense at what is 
considered an uncalled-for attack on their 
home government. Referring to Italy, Dr. 
Gifford~ said : 'The people of Italy are, on 
the whole, good; but the government is 
bad.' 

"It is asserted that this matter has been 
robbed of its lack of importance by the fact 
that it has been made an official document 
by the State of New York. The Italians, 
however, do not know just what action to 



take, as their representative is accredited 
to the United States and has nothing to do 
with the State Government. On the other 
hand, New York State can not well be 
called to account in a matter of this sort 
from Washington. 

"Englishmen have a special grievance 
against Dr. Gifford. He seems to believe 
that the sons of old England are a de- 
generate lot. Referring to them he has 
said: 

" 'With the destruction of the forests in 
England have gone the stalwart men who 
once worked in them, to be replaced by the 
factory hand, knock-kneed, weak-lunged and 
sallow. Judging from what I saw during 
a recent visit to the big towns of England, 
I should say that England could better af- 
ford to pay $100,000,000 for foreign wood 
than to lose the broad shouldered and mus- 
cular men who once worked in her forests.' 

"Thus far Dr. Gifford has not been called 
to account and has volunteered no expla- 
nation of the remarks." 

The above was probably written to fill an 
aching void. Dr. Gifford has volunteered 
no explanation because none is needed to 
the person who reads his article with any 
degree of care. To call the "Italian people 
good and the government bad" is, indeed, a 
peculiar offense. The writer of the news- 
paper squib forgot to notice that the offense 
to England was quoted from an article by 
an Englishman, for which he received a 
prize in England. 



THE PRESIDENT ON FOREST PRESERVA- 
TION. 
While there is still among the public 
at large a considerable misconception of 
what forestry and forest preservation 
involve, as is evidenced by the un- 
warranted attacks on the methods of the 
College of Forestry in managing its 
demonstration forest, President Roosevelt, 
in his annual message, put the matter in 
such simple and thoroughly intelligent 
words that everybody should learn them 
by heart : 

"The fundamental idea of forestry is the 
perpetuation of forests by use. Forest pro- 
tection is not an end of itself; it is a means 
to increase and sustain the resources of our 
country and the industries which depend 
on them." 

No word of comment is needed. 



Investigation shows that the Northern 
dwarf mistletoe is common on the black 
spruce in the Adirondacks. It is para- 
sitic, causes deformity of the tree and 
in the aggregate does considerable dam- 
age. The large bunches which it causes 
are called witches' brooms. 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 



" What a Man Eats He Is." 
Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph. D. 
Author of "On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids," "Fish as Food," etc. 



LILY BULBS EATEN BY CHINESE. 

Thoupfh we are accustomed to consider 
lilies as plants for ornamental value only, 
the bulbs and flowers of several species 
have long been used as articles of food by 
the Chinese and other orientals. Of these, 
Lilium glehni forms the chief vegetable 
diet of the Ainu, an aboriginal tribe now 
confined to the islands of Hokaido, but 
Lilium tigrinum and Lilium concolor pul- 
c helium are the 2 species most commonly 
cultivated by the Chinese as articles of 
food. A recent investigator found the 
bulbs of Lilium parrum in use by the 
Washoe Indians of Nevada, and those of 
Lilium pardalinum in use by Indians of 
Northern California. 

From the early part of December to the 
latter part of August, according to a re- 
cent report made by Blasdale to the De- 
partment of Agriculture, there are found 
in the Chinese markets of San Francisco 
the bulbs of a species of Lilium which 
greatly resemble those of the well known 
Lilium auratum. These are sold at 10 to 
20 cents a pound. They are all imported 
from Canton. The bulbs have proved iden- 
tical with the ones sold by nurserymen un- 
der the name of Lilium brownii. This is 
apparently the only species sold by the 
Chinese merchants, as a large number of 
bulbs purchased at different times and 
from different dealers have invariably 
yielded plants corresponding to this spe- 
cies. Unfortunately the bulbs are often in- 
fested with mites, which, either primarily 
or secondarily, cause the death of the plant 
before it perfects its flowers. From a col- 
lection of over 100 bulbs only 10 perfect 
flowers were secured. 

What seems to be the same species may 
also be obtained in a dry form throughout 
the year, and both this and the fresh bulbs 
are known under the name of "pak hop." 

The dried bulbs, as shown by analyses, 
contain some 10 per cent, water, 5.6 per 
cent, protein, 63 per cent, starch, and small 
quantities of ash, etc. The fresh bulbs 
purchased in San Francisco contained 
much more water, and > correspondingly 
smaller quantities of nutrients. 

The Chinese regard lily bulbs more as a 
delicacy than as a standard article of diet, 
and the customary price is considerably 
above that of other vegetables in common 
use by them. It is said that they are re- 
garded by the Japanese as an especially 
desirable food for invalids and convales- 
cents. When used for this purpose the 



bulbs are only slightly cooked and are 
eaten with sugar. The bulbs sold in San 
Francisco, as far as was observed, were 
nearly devoid of the bitter principle which 
is reported to occur in several species of 
Lilium. When simply boiled, they formed 
a palatable food, and Blasdale believes 
that Americans would soon become ac- 
customed to their use. The cultural 
conditions favorable to the production 
of Lilium brownii or of some of the 
other edible species are not difficult to find 
in our own country, though it is doubtful 
whether they can be grown as cheaply as 
our other commonly cultivated vegetables. 
One valuable feature of the bulbs is the 
ease with which they may be dried, the 
resulting product being quite as acceptable 
as the fresh bulbs. The value of lilies as 
ornamental plants under present conditions 
will doubtless prevent their extended use 
as food in this country. 

Another unusual vegetable substance 
largely used as a flavoring ingredient by 
the Chinese consists of the dried flowers of 
Hemerocallis fulva, the day lily of our 
American gardens. This substance is 
known as. "kam cham t'soi," or the "gold- 
needle vegetable." The flowers of Lilium 
bulbiferum and Hemerocallis graminea are 
also used as food by the Chinese. The 
dried flower petals contain some 10 per 
cent, protein and some 56 per cent, carbo- 
hydrates. When judged by their composi- 
tion, they are seen to possess a fairly high 
food value. They are used, however, rath- 
er as a condiment than as an article of diet. 



THE BLUEBERRY INDUSTRY. 

Although from the earliest Colonial 
times the blueberry has been highly prized 
as an article of food, little attention has 
been given to the systematic exploitation 
of this fruit. In many regions of the 
Northern and Eastern United States, par- 
ticularly in New England, New York, 
Michigan and the mountains of Pennsylva- 
nia and West Virginia, there are thousands 
of acres of land which are worthless for 
ordinary agricultural purposes. After the 
pine is removed from such lands, an abun- 
dant growth of blueberry bushes, alders, 
poplars, grey birches and spireas springs 
up. It is believed that by proper manage- 
ment of these natural blueberry fields large 
areas may be made to yield a handsome 
profit to their owners, and furnish employ- 
ment to a large number of people. 

At the present time these lands, for the 
most part, are considered public property, 



64 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 



65 



and irresponsible persons, recognizing the 
fact that the blueberry crop is more abun- 
dant on young bushes which spring up 
after a fire, recklessly burn over vast areas, 
thus destroying valuable forests for their 
own selfish ends. As described by Pro- 
fessor Munson, of the Maine Agricultural 
Experiment Station, the method of har- 
vesting blueberries is somewhat as follows: 
1 he land is divided into several tracts, 
each of which is leased to some respon- 
sible party who assumes the whole care of 
burning, keeping off trespassers, harvest- 
ing and marketing the fruit. The owner 
receives, as rental, one-half cent a quart 
for all the fruit gathered. The pickers re- 
ceive 1/2 to 3 cents a quart; those -who 
lease the land and haul the fruit to the 
canning factory, or to the station for ship- 
ment, one-half to one cent a quart ; the 
rating being determined, in accordance 
with the market value, by the firm which 
handles the product. The fruit is all 
canned or shipped by one firm, which pays 
the royalty to the owner. 

Every year a certain section of each 
lease is burned over. This burning must 
be done early in the spring, before the soil 
becomes dry ; otherwise the fire goes too 
deep, the humus is burned from the 
ground and most of the bushes are killed. 
Many hundred acres on what should be the 
best part of the "barrens," as the blueberry 
lands are termed, have thus been ruined. 
Each section is burned every third year. 

By far the largest proportion of the fruit 
is taken to the factories for canning. 
Early in the season, however, before the 
factories are opened, a considerable quan- 
tity is shipped, usually in quart boxes, to 
the larger cities, for use while fresh. With 
the exception of currants and gooseberries, 
blueberries will stand rough handling bet- 
ter, and will keep longer than other small 
fruits. 

All the early fruit is picked by hand, and 
only the ripe berries are gathered. Later 
in the season, particularly on "old burns," 
that is, on areas which have not been 
burned over in some time, but which are 
to be burned the next year, the fruit is 
gathered with a blueberry rake. This is an 
implement somewhat similar to the cran- 
berry rake in use on Cape Cod, and may 
be likened to a dustpan, the bottom of 
which is composed of stiff, parallel wire 
rods. The fruit may be gathered much 
more quickly and more cheaply by means 
of the rake. The bushes are, however, se- 
riously injured by the treatment. In no 
case should the rake be used in gathering 
high bush blueberries. As the berries are 
gathered they are passed through a fanning 
mill before being sent to the canning fac- 
tory ; and again at the factory, they are 
submitted tc a stronger winnowing. This 
is usually the only preparation necessary. 



ON THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY. 
GERTRUDE F. LYNCH. 

By whatever route you cross the con- 
tinent, be sure that special attractions in 
the way of scenery will make the trip mem- 
orable; but it is safe to say that if you 
select the Canadian Pacific in preference 
to others, you will never regret the choice. 
Railroad traveling is, as a general thing, 
but a necessary evil between 2 certain 
goods — the place of departure and the place 
of destination. This general rule finds its 
notable exception on the Canadian Pacific, 
where the traveling itself is the all impor- 
tant consideration and the points of arrival 
and departure sink into insignificance, for 
all impressions and memories are for the 
time being blotted out by those created by 
the stupendous spectacles offered in this 
means of transit. 

We, as representatives of Recreation, 
boarded the cars of the C. P. R., at Van- 
couver. We were scenery-sated, for we 
had already crossed the continent and had 
spent weeks amid the marvels of the world. 
We believed that nothing could arouse our 
calloused sensibilities ; we were sure we 
had not a thrill left in our whole nervous 
outfit. We did, however, look about the 
spacious car with its soft upholstery of 
restful color, note the quiet deftness of 
the attaches, as we were conducted to our 
section, and the general neatness of detail 
with satisfaction. One can easily exhaust 
one's power of enjoyment, but appeals to 
personal comfort are rarely made in vain. 
We determined, in the manner of blase 
travelers that, if we felt so inclined, we 
should ignore alluring prospectuses and 
turn our backs on the well advertised at- 
tractions of the route in order to enjoy 
the comfort and repose of our temporary 
home. No such inclination assailed us. 
Scarcely had the train left the station when 
the passengers began to leave the sleeper to 
seek the observation car in the rear. A few 
remained to keep us company, but they 
were soon dragged away by enthusiastic 
friends. We were the last to go, and fol- 
lowing the example of the late comers, we 
remained the last. No one, I am sure, on 
that memorable trip displayed greater en- 
thusiasm or has shown more unflagging 
zeal in reminiscence. 

Through stupendous gorges, at the edges 
of canyons so deep that the head swims 
looking down, scaling mountains tipped 
with the everlasting snow, panting up 
grades so steep that 2 and 3 engines 
were brought into use, along the brink of 
yawning gulches magnificently colored, in 
gloomy snow sheds, reminders of the win- 
ters' wrath, we pursued our way. Words 
are inadequate to describe, they can merely 
suggest or perhaps invite. Nature, in this 
part of the world, has been generous in her 



66 



RECREATION. 



wrath. Chasms and steeps, ice and snow, 
rugged peaks and bottomless pits are here 
in abundance, with sullen grays, alluring 
greens and dazzling whites. She has flung 
tier challenge to man, and man, bit by bit, 
here a little and there a little, has subtly 
and persistently enclosed her threats with 
the ring of his achievement— this ring the 
Canadian Pacific Railway. It is an achieve- 
ment to be proud of ! An achievement to 
be seen and admired. 

Even to our feminine minds, untrained in 
technicalities, the engineering feat of car- 
rying this road through and over these 
mountain fastnesses was awesome. Never 
for a second did we experience a feeling 
of instability or of physical dread. We 
felt as safe there on the brinks of precipi- 
tous cliffs as we did later on the rolling 
prairies. 

Strength and skill are not the only quali- 
ties displayed by the makers of this road. 
Everywhere is shown a keen appreciation 
of its artistic possibilities. This is noted 
particularly in the locations chosen for the 
wayside inns where our meals- were taken, 
during the first day and a half of our 
journey. At these places the train remains 
half or Y\ of an hour, as need be. We 
were ushered into flower-decked rooms 
where big open fires took the chill from 
the mountain air and even the scenery 
was forgotten for a little while as we 
gathered about the hospitably filled tables. 
The prairies come just in time. One could 
not stand the strain of this wonderful 
journey too long. We left Banff at 
night, and when we awoke we were on 
the plains, as in music the composer puts 
the bars of rest after the succession of 
stormy harmonies. Approaching from the 
West, Banff is really the climax of the 
journey. From the East it is promise of that 
which is to come. It has been made mem- 
orable recently by the visit of the Royal 
Couple, but it needs no royal approval to 
emphasize its attractions. Towering moun- 
tains enclose it as a gem is imbedded in its 
matrix. There are charming walks and 
drives, scenery which suggests Chamounix 
in the Alps — that most beautiful Swiss vil- 
lage; an hotel with every possible comfort 
and luxury from its cuisine to its sulphur 
baths, and an interesting assortment of cos- 
mopolitan guests. There are other stop- 
ping points of interest where a day or 2 can 
be wisely spent, Glacier notably, which has 
also a fine hotel and scenery equally im- 
pressive. 

In a word, take the Canadian Pacific 
Railroad either going or coming — both, if 
possible. To say that to cross the con- 
tinent merely to return by that route would 
repay the traveler, is not saying too much ; 
it is not saying enough. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



SUMMER FURNITURE. 

The Old Hickory Chair Company, of 
Martinsville, Ind., is turning out a 
unique product. This is rustic furniture 
made entirely of hickory. The hickory 
groves of Indiana have long been famous, 
and "tough as hickory" is a local expres- 
sion which represents the limit of endur- 
ance. No material could be better adapted 
than hickory for the manufacture of furni- 
ture suitable for country cottages, country 
clubs, log cabins, or other places where 
perhaps much hard usage would befall it. 
This company makes a large and attractive 
line of chairs, tables, settees, and other 
household pieces, as well as lawn and 
veranda seats, rustic bridges, summer 
houses, and even log cabins, notched and 
marked, ready to put up. All the frame- 
work of Old Hickory furniture is made of 
hickory saplings, with the bark on. This 
is a soft, quiet color, giving a rustic yet 
neat and artistic effect. The seats and 
backs of chairs are plaited by hand, of the 
inner hickory bark, which is of ■ great 
strength. The material is all chemically 
treated, so it is free from germs and in- 
sect life. 

The company issues a complete and 
handsome catalogue. Write them for it, 
and please say you saw their ad in Recre- 
ation. 



A NOVELTY FOR ANGLERS. 

All anglers who fish much, and buy their 
minnows, will save money and annoyance 
by using a Fisk Aerating Minnow pail, 
made by J. M. Kenyon & Co. See their 
ad in this issue. The pail is so arranged 
that by means of an air pump and rubber 
tubes the water is constantly supplied with 
fresh air, which is necessary to keep the 
minnows alive. 

I have one of these pails, which I have 
tested thoroughly, and find it works as the 
manufacturers claim it will. The pail con- 
tains a large air chamber in the bottom, 
into which air can be forced under a heavy 
pressure. Then it leaks out gradually into 
the bottom of the water chamber of the 
pail and comes up through the water, 
forming a stream of small bubbles. I have 
not made a test as to how long minnows 
could be kept alive in one pail of water, 
with this machine, but see no reason why 
they should not live in it indefinitely. 

I have found Messrs. Kenyon & ' Com- 
pany thoroughly reliable people and I feel 
confident that any reader of Recreation 
who may order a minnow pail from them, 
and send his money in advance, will get 
just what he pays for. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



67 



A BUSINESS SUCCESS. 

About 12 years ago Higgins & Seiter be- 
gan business as dealers in glass and china 
in a small basement in West 226. street. 
Five times they have increased their room 
and facilities, and last summer they erected 
in conjunction with their 3 stores in West 
22d street a 6 story building in 21st street. 
This is now amply stocked with the goods 
with which their name has become identi- 
fied. The members of the firm attribute 
their growth largely to persistent adver- 
tising. There is not a month in the year in 
which the fact that they "sell glass and 
china % less than elsewhere," is not kept 
prominently before the public. Much of 
their business is done through mail orders, 
from Maine to California. 

The dinner table department always has 
an immense assortment of fine china and 
glass, and articles that are suitable for 
gifts are shown in a fascinating variety. 
Not omy the choicest china and the richest 
cut glass are displayed, but also statuettes 
in marble and bronze, plaques, pedestals, 
hall clocks, candelabra, and finally paintings 
and water colors by well known artists. — 
New York Daily Tribune. 



THE NECESSARY KODAK. 

The Canadian government has officially 
recognized the Kodak as a necessary part 
of a camping outfit for hunting and fishing 
parties. In a circular issued by the Hon. 
John McDougald, Commissioner of Cus- 
toms, dated at Ottawa, Canada, July 1st, 
1897, he says, "Persons visiting Canada for 
health or pleasure may bring with them 
such guns, fishing rods, canoes, tents, 
camp equipment, cooking utensils, Kodaks, 
etc., as they may require while in Canada, 
etc.'' The circular goes on to provide that 
such outfits may be taken into Canada by 
depositing with the Collector, at the port of 
entry, a sum equivalent to the regular duty 
thereon, and that this sum will be refunded 
to the visitor on his return from the Do- 
minion on presentation of receipts origi- 
nally given him for the money by the cus- 
toms officer. 

This is indeed a well deserved recogni- 
tion of the value of the Kodak for every 
hunter, angler or pleasure seeker. 



MINING IN MONTANA. 

Nearly one-third of the Wonderland 
book, for 1902, is devoted to mining in 
Montana, which dates from the early 6o's. 

The old mining days and the incidents 
of the time, most dramatic, are portrayed 
and photographs of the oldtime camps are 
given. 

Many of these old historic spots, such as 
Alder Gulch, Confederate Gulch, etc., were 
visited by Mr. O. D. Wheeler, who wrote 
the book. The Montana mining of today, 



scientific in every detail, is also shown in 
its vast proportions. 

To those interested in this subject and 
who desire to know the great value of the 
mining industry in Montana, this chapter 
will prove interesting and valuable reading. 
It is profusely illustrated. 

If you want a copy of the book, you 
have only to send 6 cents to Chas. S. Fee, 
G. P. A., St. Paul, and mention Recrea- 
tion. 

There was a serious mutiny in the United 
States penitentiary at Fort Leavenworth, 
Kan., in December last, in which several 
of the guards were killed, a number of 
the convicts killed and wounded, and some 
escaped, although they were mostly re- 
captured. It appears that the arms which 
the guards had on that occasion failed to 
work properly, and that was apparently 
one of the reasons why the convicts es- 
caped. Such being the fact, it was decided 
by the United States authorities to call for 
sample arms for the purpose of testing, and 
to equip the guards with the arm which 
was most suitable and reliable. The Sav- 
age Arms Company was approached for 
sample arms, which were promptly shipped, 
and the Savage rifle was adopted. The 
order has been placed for entirely re-arm- 
ing the guards with these rifles, although 
it is the highest priced rifle on the market. 



Columbiaville, Mich. 
Ithaca Gun Co., Ithaca, N. Y. : 

Dear Sirs : — The Ithaca gun which you 
recently sent me on Mr. Shields' order as 
a premium for Recreation subscribers is 
at hand, and is in every way satisfactory. 
I do not believe there is any other gun, 
selling for anywhere near the reasonable 
price of this one, that can equal it for 
beauty of workmanship and for close, hard 
shooting. Several of your guns are owned 
by sportsmen in this place, and are well 
liked. In a letter received from Mr. Shields 
a few weeks ago he assured me that your 
guns are first class in every respect, which 
is true. We all read Recreation here, and 
like to see your ad looming up prominently 
in our favorite magazine. I shall always 
take pleasure in recommending your guns. 
Yours truly, A. L. Vermilya. 



A remarkable invention for the con- 
venience of 'tourists is the new Goerz 
Photo-Stereo Binocular. This wonderful 
little instrument is in size and appearance 
an ordinarv opera glass, and it serves that 
purpose. It is also a field glass, a simple 
camera and a stereoscopic camera ; 4 neces- 
sities in one. It is small, light, strongly 
and perfectly made, and exceedingly power- 
ful. It makes clear, sharp photos 1^4 by 



68 



RECREATION. 



2 inches, which admit of perfect enlarge- 
ment. It gives either instantaneous or 
time exposures. As a field glass it magni- 
fies y/2 times, and as an opera glass 2 l / 2 
times. The photo lenses are Goerz double 
anastigmat. Write the C. P. Goerz Opti- 
cal Works, 52 Union Square East, New 
York, for a descriptive circular and please 
mention Recreation. 



The ideal Manufacturing Company is al- 
ways on the alert to make tools and im- 
plements that will meet tne needs of shoot- 
ers. The latest device made by this Com- 
pany is the Ideal shot shell trimmer. This 
is a practical implement that will properly 
trim paper shells that have been fired. 
With it the soft and frayed ends of shells 
that have been fired a number of times 
may be cut off to any length desired. This 
trimmer is made for all gauges. 

Every shooter should have a copy of the 
latest Ideal Hand Book, full of information 
to shooters. It also gives description and 
price of all Ideal Implements, which should 
be kept by all dealers in arms and ammuni- 
tion. Address Ideal Mfg. Co., New Haven, 
Conn., and mention Recreation. 



Mr. E. H. Fitch has bought the interest 
of A. E. Gehben in the old firm of 
D. T. Abercrombie & Co., and the 
new concern will be known as Abercrombie 
& Fitch. Mr. Fitch is a gentle brother of 
the angle, a big game hunter, a good wing 
shot and, in fact, an all around sportsman 
and lover of outdoor life. Everybody 
knows Mr. Abercrombie's qualifications for 
conducting a business such as he has been 
running for years, and in this new addi- 
tion to his working strength the house will 
be able to do everything that any reason- 
able sportsman could wish done, in the 
way of providing complete camping outfits. 
I know Mr. Fitch personally, and bespeak 
for him the good will and the confidence 
of all readers of Recreation. 



E. W. Stiles, 141 Washington street, 
Hartford, Conn., has issued a new and at- 
tractive catalogue of goods made of buffalo 
horns. These include mirrors, gun racks, 
buffalo skulls mounted on shields, electric 
light fixtures in great variety, silver loving 
cups artistically mounted with buffalo horn 
handles, e*x. 

These horns are genuine buffalo, picked 
up on the Western plains. The articles 
made in combination with these horns form 
interesting and valuable American sou- 
venirs of an animal now nearly extinct. 
Write E. W. Stiles for a catalogue of these 
unique goods and say you saw it men- 
tioned in Recreation. 



The Charles Daly gun has long been 
a standard among the better class of 
shooters, but the price has been be- 
yond the reach of thousands of men 
who have often wished they could 
have one of these guns. In response 
to this large demand, Schoverling, Daly 
& Gales, of this city, have now put 
on the market a Charles Daly gun which 
retails at $80. It has many of the good 
qualities of the high-priced Daly guns, but 
01 course is not so highly finished. See 
the ad of the new Daly in this issue of 
Recreation, and write the manufacturers 
for full particulars. Mention Recreation. 



Jespersen & Hines have been occupying 
only half of the store at 10 Park Place, New 
York, with their sporting goods business, 
but it has outgrown that capacity, so they 
have crowded the other man out and will 
hereafter occunv the entire store. They 
will add to their previous lines a full outfit 
of tents, boats, camping outfits, sportsman's 
clothing and many other things they have 
not heretofore kept in stock, so readers of 
Recreation may feel safe in ordering al- 
most anything they may want from that 
house, and their orders will always receive 
prompt and careful attention. 



E. S. Applegate & Co., of Trenton, N. 
J., have been compelled by increase of 
business to move to still larger quarters, 
and have selected a more central location, 
at 17 South Broad street. They carry a 
much larger stock ' than heretofore of bi- 
cycles, guns, ammunition, fishing tackle, 
sporting and athletic goods. To these they 
have lately added canoes, gasoline launches 
and general boating supplies. Sportsmen 
would do well to write Messrs. Applegate 
& Co., at their new address. Please say 
you saw it in Recreation. 



Rolla O. Heikes, the veteran shooter of 
the scatter gun, recently established a new 
record for long range flying target shoot- 
ing at Waco, Texas. Mr. Heikes broke 99 
out of 100 targets with a run of 89 breaks 
without a miss, at 10 yards. This work 
speaks well for the uniformitv in the veloc- 
ity and pattern of his load — factory loaded 
U. M. C. shells. 



Sea Breeze, Fla. 

Drs. H. R. Phillips and Wrean, 
Penn Yan, N. Y. 
Dear Sirs : Rabbits and pedigrees arrived 
safe. The rabbits are in good condition 
and please me greatly. Yours truly, 

C. M. Barlofy. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



THE PICTORIAL SIDE OF THE GAME HOG 
WAR. 
Many people say I talk too much about 
game and fish hogs. In fact, some of my 
best friends say this; but there are thou- 
sands of other good people who heartily 
approve everything I say and do in this 



Df. J. S. Trotter. 

56^ Walden Ave., 
tJutfalo. ,~ - N. YJ 



and hearty approval of my work. The first 
shown is from a prominent physician in 
Buffalo. Another comes from the Hon. W. 
D. Jenkins, Secretary of the State of 
Washington ; another is from a well 
known business man of York, Neb., and 
still another from Glasgow, N. S. 



L. U ' 





— 9 — 7W ^N__, 



line. I get great numbers of letters ex- 
pressing this approval in words. Then, 
the extent to which my crusade appeals to 
the pictorial sense of my readers, is another 
indication. Here are reproductions of a 
few of the many envelopes that come to 
this office, bringing encouraging messages 



I have reproduced in Recreation many 
pictures showing how the pork roasting 
business appeals to artists in various por- 
tions of the country. If I should print all of 
these, reducing each to a space 2 inches 
square, it would take at least 20 pages to 
hold them. Meantime, I hear of thousands 



In 5 days return td 

WILL D. JENKINS, 

.SECRETARY OF STATS, 

OLYMPIA. WASH. 




69 



70 



RECREATION. 



Xfter 10 days, return to 







■2.3 T^a-f 4k- 



of men who still delight in slaughtering 
game, but who now exercise the utmost 
care in keeping their tracks covered, lest 
Recreation find them. It is amusing to 
learn from the neighbors of some of these 
game and fish butchers how carefully the 
latter smuggle in their big bags and what 



/Y <1>V Y^ ft ^ 

NY 



gets a copy of the photograph, sends it to 
me, and in due time it appears in Recre- 
ation, together with the names and ad- 
dresses of the men who perpetrated the 
butchery. Then these men either reform 
or fall into the ranks of the skulkers and in 
future, when they return from their 





Ifeitr York. 

- MY. 



precautions they take to keep the neighbors 
from hearing of them. There are still 
some who have not learned the lesson of 
the past few years, and who, when they 
make a big killing, rush madly to a local 
photographer, string up their game, stand up 
beside it, and get photographed. Then comes 
the inevitable. Some friend of the game 



slaughtering matches, they sneak up the 
back alley after dark, tote their game into 
the kitchen and make the members of the 
household swear not to tell about it. 

Ernest T. Seton tells of a case of this 
kind that came under his notice in New 
Mexico. A party of game hogs went from 
that State across the border into Texas, 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



7i 





A , viAM&hoc7..LMiw.GLkflji! BiM.EAii.oii"' 



and shot quails. They had what they called 
glorious sport for several days. They 
literally loaded their wagon with birds. 
Then they drove home in triumph. When 
they neared town they stopped, got out, 
and strung quails all over the wagon box 




The Best Mmjm?in* €mh IkTahX 

Accuracy mr Affected by wind 
Range not yet Ascertained 

But XkOWN To BE AcKOSS THE CONTINENT, 
Twi Brst weapon YoKCAnE Hogs. 

As& Co2uir(\ About it. 



w 



;&■ 



and over the harness. They then drove 
up in front of the local picture gallery, got 
out some more quails, strung them over 
themselves, hung large bunches on their 
guns, stood about the team and had them- 
selves photographed. 

Meantime some decent citizen of the 
town who saw the disgusting array, went 
to the sheriff and reported the case to him. 
He was also a decent man, and went after 
the game hogs. When he questioned them 
they put up a defense to the effect that 



the game was not killed in New Mexico, 
but over the line in Texas. Hence, they 
said, they were exempt from the New 
Mexico law, and no Texas officer could 
follow them into New Mexico to arrest 
them. 

"But," said a bystander, "just wait till 
Recreation gets a copy of this picture." 

"Who is Recreation?" inquired one of 
the butchers. 

"It's a magazine published in New York 
which gives such fellows as you what you 
deserve." 

A hun ied consultation was held and the 
game hogs decided it would be best not 
to have the pictures, after all. Then they 
called on the photographer again, counter- 
manded the order and asked for the nega- 
tive he had made. He was on to the 
scheme, and said : 

"Nay, nay, Pauline, the negative is mine. 
I shall be glad to sell you any number 
of prints you may wish, but I shall not 
part with the negative. I can sell a print 
from it to a certain New York editor for 
many shekels." 

"But," said the game hogs, "we do not 
want him to have a print." 

"But I do," said the picture maker, 
"and I want his money." 

While the picture was being made, the 
local editor had obtained full particulars 
of the hunt, returned to his office and was 
busy writing up the story. A committee 
was despatched to his office to ask him to 
suppress the report. He said: 

"Nay, nay Pauline, this is good stuff an4 
I must print it." 

"But we don't want it printed." 

"But I do," said the editor. "I do not 
annrove of such slaughter of game as you 
have been guilty of, and intend to give you 
a column. Then I will send a marked copy 
to a certain New York editor who will give 
you fellows rat§." 



72 



RECREATION. 



By that time the game hogs were hot 
all over and were down in their buckskin 
wallets for money to buy the negative, and 
<"o keep the story out of the local paper. 
It took all the dust they had to suppress the 
photographer and the editor. 

Similar scenes are being enacted every 
day, somewhere in the country. Recrea- 
tion is threatened about once a month with 
a libel suit or an injunction suit, as a re- 
sult of its branding process ; but its picture 
gallery grows apace and some days 2 paces. 



AND SHANLEY PAYS THE FREIGHT. 

In February, 1901, I learned that grouse, 
quails and woodcock were being served at 
Shanley's restaurant, 1212 Broadway, New 
York. This was 45 days after the close 
of the legal season for selling these 
birds ; so I went to Shanley's to din- 
ner one night, took 2 friends with 
me, ordered quails on toast and got them. 
The next day I took 3 friends to lunch 
there, and we each had a woodcock. Then 
the next night we dined on ruffed grouse. 
The next day we took broiled quails again, 
for a change. In each case I carefully 
wrapped up the bones of one of the birds 
and brought them away with me. We 
kept on eating game until we thought we 
had enough penalties chalked up against 
Mr. Shanley to teach him a lesson. Then 
I had my attorney draw up a complaint 
against Mr. Shanley and he was summoned 
to court to . answer for his illegal deeds. 
As usual the case hung fire a long time and 
was bandied about by the opposing counsel. 
A few months ago Mr. Shanley got tired 
of playing football in court, offered to con- 
fess judgment and pay a penalty of $250. 
Under existing circumstances the League 
officers decided it would be well to accept 
this proposition; so Mr. Shanley paid his 
good money into court and the case was 
(disposed of. 

Under the game and fish laws of this 
State the complainant in such case gets 
half of the fine imposed, after paying attor- 
ney's fees. Accordingly, I have received 
from the State Treasurer a check for $100 
.as my moiety in this case, and have bought 
with it 5,000 2-cent envelopes. These are 
to be used in carrying on the League work 
as long as they last, which will probably 
be 3 or 4 months. Mr. Shanley may, there- 
fore, feel assured that his money is being 
put to good use. The envelopes which I 
have bought with it are . now carrying 
League literature all over the United States 
and Canada. They are carrying copies of 
this statement to thousands of hotel and 
restaurant men in various towns and cities, 
to warn them as to what may haopen to 
them if they serve game in close season. 
Some of these envelopes are carrying 



notices to game dealers in various States 
of the Union, to remind them that in sell- 
ing game to hotel and restaurant men they 
are perhaps contributing to the future grief 
of such customers. 

I trust Mr. Shanley may enjoy these re- 
flections, and that in future he will en- 
deavor to feed his patrons on food that 
may be sold and served without violating 
any law. 



If the June number of Recreation is bet- 
ter than its predecessors, it is owing to the 
fact that the Editor was away while it was 
being made up and put to press. Of course 
I roasted some pork and fixed up a few 
other things for that issue before leaving 
home, but the detail of the work was left 
to an able corps of assistants, who, I trust, 
have done their work to the entire satisfac- 
tion of all my readers and advertisers. 

Where have I been? In the Selkirk 
mountains, British Columbia. I spent a 
month climbing mountains, in the hope of 
regaining my health, which has been seri- 
ously impaired by overwork. I am not 
cured, but am a lot better off than I was. 
I shall be compelled to absent myself 
from business during a portion of the sum- 
mer, but shall keep in close touch with the 
office, and the interests of the magazine 
will be carefully looked after. The League 
work will also be in good hands during my 
absence, and I trust I may get in such 
shape by next fall that I can take up both 
lines of work with renewed vigor. 



I have received at least 100 clippings from 
various newspapers telling of a large killing 
of ducks, said to have been made near 
Norfolk, Va., in March last, by Grover 
Cleveland, Paul Van Dyke and others. I 
wrote Mr. Cleveland, asking if the reports 
were correct, and he replied, "I am glad to 
say there is no approach to truth in the 
story of duck butchery referred to." 

I also wrote Mr. Van Dyke, and he 
answered to the same effect. 

It is well known that nearly all news- 
paper reporters, when talking of prominent 
men who go hunting or fishing, grossly ex- 
aggregate the quantity of fish caught or 
game killed. In view of Mr. Cleveland's 
frank statement, it is fair to assume that 
the wild-eyed reporters of Norfolk who in- 
terviewed him and his friends on their re- 
turn from the hunting trip are no exception 
to the rule. 



You would be surprised, or at least I 
was, to find in the little towns up the line 
and out by the St. Lawrence river, Rec- 
reation lying on the counter of some 
news stand. It certainly has a wide circu- 
lation. 

R, C. W, Lett, Ottawa, Qnt, 



KECK11AT10N. 



73 



Poor Beervs. Pure Beer 



Both cost you alike, yet one costs the 
maker twice as much as the other. One 
is good and good for you; the other is 
harmful. Let us tell your where the 
difference lies. 



POOR BEER 

is easy to brew. 

The materials are cheap. 
The brewing may be done un- 
der any sort of surroundings. 
Cleanliness is not impor- 
tant, for the users never see it 
brewed. 

Any water will do. No air 

is to.o impure for the cooling. 

No filtering, no sterilizing; 

almost no ageing, for ageing ties 

up money. 

What is the use of expense 
and care when there is no repu- 
tation to defend ? — 

When few people who drink 
it know even the name of the 
maker. 



PURE BEER 

calls for the best materials 
— the best money can buy. 

The brewery must be as 
clean as your kitchen; the uten- 
sils as clean. 

The cooling must be done 
in filtered air, in a plate glass 
room. 

The product must be aged 
for months, until thoroughly fer- 
mented, else biliousness results. 

The beer must be filtered, 
then sterilized in the bottle. 

You're always welcome to that 
brewery, the owners are proud 
of it. 

And the size of it proves the 
eventual success of worth. 



To maintain its standard, we double the nec- 
essary cost of our brewing". Don't you prefer a 
pure beer, a good beer, a healthful beer, when 
it costs no more than common? 

Ask for the brewery bottling. 




The Beer That Made Milwaukee Famous 



74 



RECREATION. 



- 






The 



Magic 





The magazine of theS/tappa Camera is the wonder 
of the photographic world. It carries 12 plates or 24 
films which it changes like magic the instant the expos- 
ure is made. Whether you take a picture every second 
or only one a week, you always have a fresh plate or film 
ready for instant use. Every exposure is entirely separate and 
distinct and can be correctly developed. The 

Snappa 

Camera 

is fitted with the famous Plantograph Lens, the new Auto Shutter and every 
adjustment an expert requires. If you want to understand the latest wonders 
of photography you must know all about this wonderful camera. Ask 
to see it at the dealers or send for an illustrated book — FREE. 

Rochester Optical and Camera Co., 119 South St., Rochester, N.Y. 




AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



7i 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

" For sport the lens is better than the gun. " 
I wish to make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their experi- 
ence in photography. 

7th ANNUAL COMPETITION. 

Recreation has conducted 6 amateur 
photographic competitions, all of which 
have been eminently successful. The 7th 
opened April 1st, 1902, and will close No- 
vember 30th, 1902. 

Following is a list of prizes to be 
awarded : 

First prize; A Long Focus Korona Camera 
5x7, made by the Gundlach Optical Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., fitted with a Turner-Reich Anastig- 
mat Lens, and listed at $85. 

Second prize: A No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak, 
made by the Eastman Kodak Co.. Rochester, N. 
Y., fitted with a Bausch & Lomb Lens Plastig- 
niat Unicum Shutter, and listed at $61.50. 

Third prize : An Al-Vista-Panoramic Camera, 
made by the 'Vultiscope and Film Co., Burlington, 
Wis., and listed at $40. 

Fourth prize: A Wizard C Camera, 4x5, 
made by the Manhattan Optical Co. Cresskill, 
N. J., with B. & L. Iris Diaphragm and Leather 
Carrying Case; listed at $3,3. 

Fifth prize: A Waterproof Wall Tent, 12 x 16, 
made by D. T. Abercrombie & Co., New York, 
and Listed at S3 2. 

Sixth prize: A Gold Hunting Case Watch; 
listed at S50. 

Seventh prize: A Tourist Hawkeye Camera, 
4x5, and made by the Blair Camera Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., and listed at $15. 

Eighth prize : A Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, 
made by the Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., and 
listed at §6. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 8x10 Carbutt Plates, made by the Car- 
butt Dry Plate Co., Wavne Junction, Philadelphia, 
Pa. . i 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 5x7 Carbutt Plates. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 4x5 Carbutt Plates. 

A special prize : A Goerz Binocular Field Glass, 
listed at $74.25, will be given for the best picture 
of a live wild animal. 

Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, camp scenes, and to figures or 
groups of persons, or animals, repre- 
senting in a truthful manner shooting, fish- 
ing, amateur photography, bicycling, sail- 
ing or other form of outdoor or indoor 
sport or recreation. Awards to be made 
by 3 judges, none of whom shall be com- 
petitors. 

Conditions: Contestants must submit 2 
mounted prints, either silver, bromide, 
platinum or carbon, of each subject, which, 
as well as the negative, shall become the 
property of Recreation. Negatives not to 
be sent unless called for. 

In submitting pictures, please write sim- 
ply your full name and address on the back 
of each, and number such prints as you 
may send, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then in a letter ad- 
dressed Photographic Editor, Recreation, 
say, for instance : 



No. 1 is entitled 
Made with a 



camera. 



On a 



lens. 



plate. 



paper. 



Printed on 

Length of exposure, 

Then add any further information you 
may deem of interest to the judges, or to 
other amateur photographers. Same as to 
Nos. 2, 3, etc. 

This is necessary in order to save post- 
age. In all cases where more than the 
name and address of the sender and serial 
number of picture are written on the back 
of prints I am required to pay letter post- 
age here. I have paid as high as $2.50 on 
a single package of a dozen pictures, in 
addition to that prepaid by the sender, on 
account of too much writing on the prints. 

Any number of subjects may be sub- 
mitted. 

Pictures that may have been published 
elsewhere, or that may have been entered 
in any other competition, not available. No 
entry fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look 
at the camera. Occupy them in some other 
way. Many otherwise fine pictures have 
failed to win in the former competitions 
because the makers did not heed this warn- 
ing-. 



THE WORKROOM. 

For spotting mat prints, such as Velox, 
bromide, or platinum, the general practice 
of using a spotting brush and India ink, is 
not the only or most satisfactory method. 
A brush is an unwieldy thing for one so 
little accustomed to it as photographers in 
general. I have been using a certain pencil 
several years, and I find it superior in many 
ways. The fact that this pencil is unknown 
to photographers and has been introduced 
only recently, probably accounts for its not 
being used. This is the "Negro" pencil, 
made by Hardtmuth, of Vienna, and it can 
be obtained from dealers in artists' ma- 
terials. They claim it is neither graphite 
nor crayon, but keep its composition a se- 
cret. It is made in 5 grades. For spot- 
ting, No. 5, the hard, for light and delicate 
work, and No. 1 or 2, soft, for blacks will 
be found sufficient. Work done with these 
pencils does not shine as with the graphite 
or lead pencil, and it does not rub off like 
crayon work; besides it is much cleaner. 
Spotting is done much more quickly and 
neatly in this manner, than with a brush. 
An error can easily be erased with a •rub- 
ber. 

While developing Velox, bromide, or 
other papers, it often happens that some 
part of a print comes out too black, or over- 
exposed, while the remainder of the print 
is properly exposed. This can be avoided, 
by plunging the print into clean water, or 



76 



RECREATION. 



blotting it on clean blotting paper, and 
then with a brush, dipped into a 10 per 
cent solution of bromide of potash, painting 
the overprinted parts. Return to the 
developer and proceed as usual. A slow 
working developer is preferred. Wher- 
ever the bromide of potash is applied it 
checks the development ; therefore care 
must be taken not to apply so much as to 
cause it to run where it is not desired. 

A serviceable addition to the dark 
room sink is made of a board, 8 or 10 inches 
wide and a little shorter than the inside 
width of the sink. About one inch from 
each end nail 2 cross-strips or blocks, so 
that one end of the board is ^ to 1 inch 
higher than the other. This forms 'a sort 
of bench, 3 or 4 inches high, which sits 
in the sink with the higher end under the 
faucet. After this is complete, cover the 
upper surface with carpet, or some similar 
material, fold it over the edge and tack 
underneath. This may form a permanent 
fixture in the sink, or it can be removed 
at will. It should never be quite so high as 
the sides of the sink, and should be placed 
so the water will strike it at the higher end. 

When a negative is taken from the hypo 
drop it on the board, and by the time you 
have attended to a few other things it is 
sufficiently washed ; or if you are only de- 
veloping 4 or 5 plates you will need no fur- 
ther washing arrangement. The carpet cov- 
ering prevents the plates from slipoing, and 
it holds a sheet of glass so firmly that while 
cleaning old negatives or lantern slide cover 
glass, you can give them a thorough scrub- 
bing under running water, without fear of 
slipping. 

An excellent retouching medium for nega- 
tives can be made by dissolving a small 
quantity of light colored shoemaker's wax 
in gasoline, decanting the clear liquid and 
adding spirits of turpentine. 

Another .good medium is made by add- 
ing a small quantity of damar varnish to 
soirits of turpentine. Apply a small quan- 
tity of either of these to the part of the 
negative to be retouched and wipe off the 
surplus with a piece of muslin or your hand. 
I prefer the latter, as it does not leave lint 
on the negative. These formulae will per- 
mit much heavy work on the negative, 
especially if a fairly soft pencil is used. — 
Western Camera Notes. 



PRINTING IN CLOUDS 
This is a good time of the year to pro- 
cure a few cloud negatives, and if 1 or 2 
are taken now and again when out picture 
hunting, a valuable stock will soon accu- 
mulate. If taken on films, each will give 
2 views, from the fact of their being re- 
versible. 

The picture being printed, and the cloud 
negative having been chosen for the subject, 



the masking of the picture while printing 
in the cloud is the mam point to be over- 
come. The joining of the horizon lines is 
often badly done, and if by chance the pic- 
ture line is slightly intricate, it is generally 
here that a weak point exists. 

Provide yourself with a dozen or more 
sheets of thin white tracing paper, cut to the 
size of the plate you are working. When 
you have finished printing your landscape 
take it out of your frame, place it on a 
small board, place a piece of tracing paper 
over it, and retire to the other side of the 
room. You will then be able to draw with 
a fine pen over the most important objects 
in the picture a line from one side to the 
other, following, of course, the details. 
Give ample time to this part of the work, 
for without it you can not succeed. When 
you have finished this outline, all that is 
necessary is to fill in the view with India 
ink, artist's black or vermillion, and let it 
thoroughly dry, which will take but a few 
moments. Insert the cloud negative in the 
printing frame, place the print, with the 
mask in register, in position in the frame, 
and print in the cloud to the proper depth, 

If you possess a retouching desk, these 
masks may be made at night from the nega- 
tive. With a few pieces of stamp paper 
attach the edges from front of paper to 
glass side of the negative to prevent its 
slipping; afterward it can be detached and 
then blackened out. The hard lines are 
softened to a nicetv by printing through the 
tracing paper, and perhaps a little longer 
time is required to print. 

With a negative that has clouds, it often 
happens that in printing the clouds pro- 
perly the view is overdone. The tracing 
paper mask is useful in such 'cases. In 
printing on paper that gives no visible 
image, such as cartoon, platinotype, bromide, 
etc., the paper negative and mask should be 
placed veil into one corner of the frame, 
and a note made of it on the back of the 
print, so as to nrovide against any chance 
of mistakes. Nothing is more annoying than 
to find, after all your pains, that you have 
manipulated your sky upside down on the 
view when you come to develop the pic- 
ture. 

A good white tracing paper gives no 
grain that will harm a print, and care should 
be taken that it is not crumpled. It deteri- 
orates with age, going yellow, which makes 
a long printing job; but the paper is cheap 
enough for one to make a fresh mask when 
required. — Erudio, in Photographic News. 



MY MOST INSTRUCTIVE EXPERIENCE. 

My most instructive experience was the 
result of a mistake. When I first started 
making lantern slides I found difficulty in 
judging the exposure to give. I exposed 
many slides with only a few good results. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



77 



One day in making slides by reduction and 
trying to get the correct time on a nega- 
tive from which I had already made a 
slide, I forgot to stop down the lens before 
making the exposure. The slide, therefore, 
had 3 times the exposure I intended to 
give, so that 1 concluded it was another 
failure. Instead of throwing the slide away, 
however, I determined to see what I could 
make of it. and therefore mixed the 
following developer : 

Water 4 ounces. 

Saturated solution sodium sulphite 4 drams. 

Acetone 2 drams. 

Dry pyro 10 grains. 

To this I added 10 drops of a 10 per cent 
solution of bromide potassium. To my 
surprise the slide came up slowly and even- 
ly and developed to good density without 
the slightest trace of fog When thrown 
on the screen it proved fairly satisfactory. 
Taking advantage of this mistake I there- 
after proceeded along the same lines, great- 
ly over exposing the slides and so manipu- 
lating them in the developer as to give the 
best results. Since that lucky mistake I 
have lost few slides, one exposure generally 
sufficing where before I would perhaps 
make 3 to 6 exposures to get a good one. 
I do not think the above plan could be 
followed with all developers, as the tendency 
would be toward fogging ; but with pyro 
acetone I have never had the slightest trace 
of fog, and in the most contrasty nega- 
tives the shadows will not clog before the 
high lights and half tones gain their proper 
gradation. The exposure I give at a North 
window in good daylight is 3 minutes with 
stop 16. 

Another suggestion in regard to the fix- 
ing of slides will perhaps prove beneficial. 
It will freauently be noticed that although 
there is no pinhole in the slide on removing 
it from the developer, 2 or 3 will appear 
when the negative is in the fixing bath. 
This generally results where the slide is 
fixed in a flat tray. Instead of fixing by 
laying flat in a tray, get a small box, stand 
the slides up on edge in the hypo and pin- 
holes will be an infrenuent occurrence. — 
John Hadden, in Paine's Photographic 
Magazine. 

ISOCHROMATIC PLATES; 

Isochromatic plates are especially adapt- 
ed for obtaining color values. 

If the amateur will give a Crown plate 
and an isochromatic of the same speed, 
the same time and same stop, and develop 
with the same developer, he will see a vast 
difference, and, I believe, will use only the 
isochromatic plate for any subject in the 
future. The cost is only 5 cents a dozen 
more, and the result is more than 5 times 
better. 



A slow isochromatic plate is not the 
best for portraits out of doors, -as 14 sec- 
onds is too long, especially if any wind be 
blowing. The instantaneous plate is ex- 
cellent for outdoor scenes, especially if it 
be stopped down to 16 F. or 32 F. For 
all around work, the medium brand is a 
plate hard to duplicate. The best effects, 
of sea views or snow scenes can be ob- 
tained on Aristo-platino paper, from these 
plates. The surf and foam of the waves 
show as clearly as it is possible to get 
them. These plates are not more difficult 
to handle than any others. Keep all white 
light from the plate, and do not keep it too 
near the ruby light. A red lantern, with 
no white light coming out of any small 
holes or openings, is as good a lamp as 
can be had. Pyro is the best developer. 
It brings out things more clearly and gives 
a far better negative to print from. One 
need not keep his hands in the pyro all 
the time. An old knife is handy in the 
dark room for plates sticking in the hold- 
ers and to lift the plate out of the pyro. 
Here is a formula for small quantities of 
developer to be made up and used as one 
wishes to develop ; say only 2 or 4 plates. 
It can be made at a small cost, and always 
full strength, giving good results : 

Stir into 8 ounces of boiled water 1 
drachm (60 grains) carbonate of soda, 2 
drachms (120 grains) sulphur. When dis- 
solved, add 3 grains of dry pyro for each 
ounce of water; less pyro, less intensity. 
For users of 4x5 plates, 4 ounces are 
plenty. 

In making hypo I have found it well to 
use plain hypo and water, 4 ounces of wa- 
ter to one ounce of hypo, and lay aside all 
other chemicals, especially in winter. 

H. P. Wightman, Evanston, 111. 



RESULTS OF SOME EXPERIMENTS. 
The dry plate, or film, is exceedingly 
sensitive to light, yet people persist in over- 
estimating its sensitiveness when taking a 
picture and underestimating it when in the 
developing room. Do not be afraid of slow 
instantaneous instead of rapid instantane- 
ous timing. Ruby light will fog a plate if 
too near until development is well begun. 
Last summer I bought a cow, thinking I 
would photograph it with the children or 
dogs or something playing with it ; also, 
would get a genuine milking scene. When- 
ever I tried I got everything all right but 
the cow. She came out in silhouette, and I 
wasted much ammunition on that wretched 
quadruped before I found that it is almost 
impossible to snap a red cow at 10 feet. 
Finally, by using isochromatic plates and a 
slow shutter, I could take my red cow 
every time. 

. When I began to develop I entertained 
the idea that a strong developer would be 



78 



RECREATION. 



best, but luckily I met a man who put me 
on the right track, and I got well ac- 
quainted with tank development and pyro. 
I have made up the pyro developer that is 
prescribed for the plate I use and then I 
go about it this way : I use an ounce of 
each of the 2 bottles in 4 ounces of water 
to develop a dozen 4x5 plates. I fill my 
rubber tank, which is an ordinary fixing 
box with cover, nearly full of water, in- 
cluding the 2 ounces of developer, stir it, 
drop in my plates, cover, and wait 3 hours. 
It is so easy I am ashamed to admit I use 
it, but I have tried all the other ways for 
experiment 'and I do not get the results I 
do with the tank. I make all my preten- 
tious work in carbon. It is neither difficult 
nor expensive. I often use films and, of 
course, prefer them for carbon work, as 
by printing throug-h the backs I can make 
carbons by single transfer that are not re- 
versed. With plates I have to use the 
double transfer process. You do not know 
what a good print is till you have made 
your red, sepia, green, blue, brown, black, 
grey, etc., carbons. The process is king of 
all. — Edmond Pond, in the Photo-Ameri- 
can. 



MR. KIRSCHNER EXPLAINS. 
I see in February Recreation you 
awarded a prize to Mrs. P. B. Kirschner 
for a photo of a buck which was wounded 
and which, from all appearances, was 
taken in the close season, as it has velvet 
on its horns, and the foliage indicates that 
it was not in open season. The buck was 
undoubtedly killed, as it was known to 
weigh nearly 200 pounds. Of course I do 
not think Mrs. Kirschner shot the deer, 
save with her camera ; but the party who 
did shoot the deer ought to be prosecuted 
to the full extent of the law. If that deer 
was killed and weighed out of season, why 
do you not find out the offending party 
and see that he pays his fine? 

James Clemens, Nemo, S. Dak. 

On receipt of the foregoing letter I for- 
warded it to Mrs. Kirschner, and her 
husband replied as follows : 

As I killed the deer in question, I think 
it my duty to reply to the attached corre- 
spondence, thereby relieving Mrs. Kirsch- 
ner from all responsibility. If Mr. Clem- 
ens has never seen a deer in the velvet in 
September, he has yet something to learn. 
His argument that the foliage shown in 
the photo indicates that the deer was taken 
in the close season, will not hold. The 
foliage shown in the photo is chiefly, if 
not wholly, witchhopple, which does not 
die off in June like sage brush in Dakota, 
which Mr. Clemens probably had in mind. 

I wounded the deer near Big Otter lake. 
New York, September 3, 1901, He got 



away from me, and as it was getting too 
dark to follow him, I left him over night, 
knowing he was badly hurt. The 
next morning, together with Mrs. Kirsch- 
ner and my brother, a guide, we took up 
the deer's trail and soon found him lying 
down as indicated in photo, when another 
shot finished him. 

Any further information you may wish 
regarding this matter will be cheerfully 
given. 

P. B. Kirschner, Lowell, Mass. 



UNCLE TOSH AND THE CAMERA GIRL. 

Yeh see, she wuz a summer girl, an' 
when she come down tu our place tu stay 
a week, she brot a thing-ma-gum she 
called a Kodax with her. 

It wuz a kind uv a box with a eyehole 
in one end, an' a button tu press on the 
side. 

When you pressed the button it tuk a 
pictur. I kno' it did, fer I saw one it tuk 
uv M'ria, milkin' th' jersey cow, an' it 
wuz jist as nateral as life. 

That gal wuz a stunner ! She wore 
purty cloze, an' she had th' new Florodoro 
hold-up way uv liftin' her dress, to per- 
fection. 

Ev'ry man in town wuld turn an' look 
after her when she past by. 

Why, I'd stop buggin' th' pertaters any 
day an' set up at th' corner fer an hour to 
see her go crost the street. 

Well, I wuz goin' to tell yeh 'bout that 
Kodax. 

She went round snappin' it at most 
everything she see. 

She told me she liked to git Gene Ray 
picturs ; she sed Gene Ray picturs told a 
story. They never told me any, tho'. 

One day little Bobby fell in th' soap kit- 
tle an' ruined his new pance. She tuk a 
snap shot uv him an' called it "A Sunset in 
Greece." 

One day when M'ria wuz trimmin' my 
hare an' whiskers with the sheep shears, 
th' gal tuk a pictur uv us an' called it 
"Moss from an Old Mans"; an' one time 
when she got her close fast on th' stake- 
and-rider fense, an' I had tu go an' hep 
her down, she remarked, "Saved from 
over-exposure." 

Some time I'll tell yer about how she 
tuk th' pictur uv the yearlin' calf. — West- 
ern Camera Notes. 



SHOULD BE NEUTRAL. 
Must sulphite of soda be exactly neutral? 
I have some which is strongly alkaline. I 
bring it as near neutral as I can with sul- 
phuric acid and litmus paper. Is that 
method correct? Does it not form a sul- 
phate which is a powerful reducer or re- 
strainer? 5 How should pyro be used, kept, 
etc.? How long should a plate be in pyro 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



79 



developer? Is it economical to use com- 
bined developer and fixer, and is it worth 
anything in your opinion? How can plates 
be spotted? I mean how is it done? Can 
"E. W. N." be bought in smaller quanti- 
ties? Should an acid fixer be used with 
an alkaline developer? How can portraits 
best be made with a 4 x 5 Wizard B. and 
a Nehring portrait lens? My room in 
which I make them has windows on the 
West. 

Edgar R. Thome, West Hanover, Pa. 

ANSWER. 

Sulphite of soda is neutral if good. Al- 
kaline sulphite disturbs the balance of 
your developer, naturally. 

Some only keep a stock solution of sul- 
phite at 60 grains to the ounce, or even 
40, and add dry pyro and dry soda as 
wanted when developing. 

. Boflay is good. It is, I believe, hydro- 
chinone and hypo with carbonate of potash. 

Send to E. W. Newcomb, Bible House, 
New York City, for circular in answer to 
this, no charge for directions. The 50 
cent box is the least quantity sold. 

Acid fixer is often used after alkaline 
developer, and you will find it recommend- 
ed for many plates by the makers. 

Your arrangement is good. If you use a 
reflecting screen to one side of and a little 
in front of the sitter you will have good 
results. — Editor. 



NOTHING BETTER THAN PYRO. 

Does the length of time a P. O. P. print 
remains in the toning bath affect the perma- 
nency; whether removed quickly for red 
or brown tones, or left the usual length of 
time, as for purple or black? 

You place pyro ahead of all other devel- 
opers. I have never used it, and' hesitate 
now to make a change, since my work, 
though not altogether satisfactory to my- 
self, is fair. Do you think the results would 
justify the extra trouble of using pyro, 
with its staining propensities, etc.? 

Is there any method of preventing the 
tendency to fog, during development in hot 
weather, other than using ice, where this is 
hard to obtain? 

Amateur, Blackstone, Va. 

ANSWER. 

The print, in combined bath, should re- 
main only long enough to insure fixation, 
regardless of the tone. In the double tones 
you may tone red, purple or nearly black 
in gold and then fix in hypo without affect- 
ine the permanency of the print. 

Pyro is absolutely the best developer 
there is, and will give amateurs far better 
results than so-called stainless developers, 
which do stain after all. By using plate 
lifters for plates and clips for film you 



need never soil your fingers in pyro. The 
sooner you use it the better it will be for 
you. 

Plates do not fog any more during hot 
weather than cold, nor will ice stop fog. If 
you mean frill, use formaldehyde in your 
hypo, one dram to a pint. If you mean 
fog, stop up the cracks in your room, re- 
place your slides squarely in the holder, 
do not use a leaky lamp, keep holders in 
shade when out, and you will not have so 
much fog. — Editor. 



TO GIVE CRIMSON TONE. 

Crimson prints are a new thing, that 
is, as far as anything can be new in this 
age of second-hand discoveries. The ton- 
ing bath is made up when wanted and 
used at once, and is as follows: 
Sulphocyanide of ammonia ... .75 grains. 

Iodide of potash 20 

Water . 3 ounces. 

Chloride of gold, dissolved in 2 

drams water 4 grains. 

Wash the prints well before toning, and 
see to it that they are but proof deep. 
Fix full 15 minutes, as silver iodide dis- 
solves less freely in hypo than silver 
chloride. Toning to a bright crimson 
with the above bath takes 30 to 45 minutes. 
There is your formula; now if you want 
to paint the town's portraits red, go 
ahead. 

Blue prints are in favor again. I am 
glad of it. The humble, simply made, 
water-developed, permanent old chap has 
not deserved to be let alone as he has 
been for some years. Try a 9x14 panel 
in blue, with a border of silver paint 
% inch wide around the edge. Call it a 
Venetian or a Cyanotype, or any other 
name, state that it is warranted absolutely 
fadeless and permanent, and charge an 
extra price for it. Might be just the thing 
to revive interest in some of your nega- 
tives. — E. W. Newcomb, in the Profes- 
sional and Amateur Photographer. 



HOW TO WORK URANIUM INTENSIFIER. 

I inclose clipping giving formula for in- 
tensifier. Will you please explain more 
fully, through Recreation, how to work 
it? T. Beach, Columbia, Ala. 

The clipping enclosed by Mr. Beach is 
as follows : 

Nitrate of uranium intensifier will give 
to the thinnest negatives printing qualities 
which the mercurial intensifier fails to give 
on account of the red color which it im- 
parts to the negative. The formula is the 
following: Solution I., dilute acetic acid 
with 4 times its bulk of water. To 100 
narts of it add one part of nitrate of uran- 
ium. Solution II. is a one per cent, solu- 
tion of red prussiate of potassium. For 



8o 



RECREATION. 



use, add Solution II. to Solution I. in 
equal quantities. 



ANSWER. 



i quart ; glycerine, I ounce ; soak 5 minutes 
after washing and pin up film, right out of 
soaking solution, by its 4 corners. — Editor. 



The formula says to add 8 ounces of 
water to 2 ounces of glacial acetic acid. 
That gives 10 ounces of dilute acid. To 
that, add 44 grains of nitrate of uranium. 
Then mix 50 grains of red prussiate of 
potash in 10 ounces of water. Bottle each 
separately and label A and B. Use one 
ounce or more of each to intensify nega- 
tives and throw away this mixed intensi- 
fier after use. Separately they keep, but 
not mixed A and B. — Editor. 



TRANSMISSION OF LIGHT 
Following is a good way to experiment 
with the effects of the selective transmis- 
sion of light produced in the negative, or 
in other words the results of absorbing 
partly or wholly one or more of the 3 
colors, red, green and violet, which go to 
make up the light that reaches the plate. 
Place in a clear hypo or hypo-chrome alum 
solution a plate which has been spoiled in 
exposing or any plate in which there is no 
free silver. A new plate is best. Leave 
until every trace of the silver and bro- 
mium salts has disappeared. When the 
opaqueness has vanished the operation is 
about Ya, completed. After thoroughly 
washing out the hypo dry carefully. 
When the gelatine is hard lay the plate, 
film down, on a clean filter or blotter and 
cut it with a diamond into squares of a 
size sufficient to cover the *lens. These 
small plates will readily assume the color 
of any solution into which they are placed. 
Do not use a solution that will leave a 
crystalline deposit on the film in drying. 
Procure some of the aniline colors and mix 
them to suit yourself. Varied results will 
be obtained by combining one or more of 
the screens or by only partially covering 
the lens during exposure. 

William A. Fuller, Ithaca, N. Y. 



SNAP SHOTS. 

Is E. W. Newcomb's spotting medium, 
mentioned in March Recreation, used for 
retouching negatives? Where can I ob- 
tain it? What will keep films from roll- 
ing? 

My husband and I enjoy Recreation 
greatly, and find much useful and inter- 
esting reading matter in it. 

Mrs. R. E. Sumner, Ludlow, Mass. 

ANSWER. 

No, Newcomb's Ideal spotting medium 
is not to retouch negatives in the sense of 
smoothing out faces. It is to fill in holes, 
scratches, etc., in both negative and 
print. You will find the soaking solution 
given in Eastman's instructions the proper 
thing to keep films from curling: Water, 



Those who are accustomed to work the 
carbon process, know that when the same 
warm water has been used for developing 
several carbon prints, the dissolved gela- 
tine has an unpleasant, tendency to work up 
into a froth by the inevitable splashing of 
the water. To skim off this froth is only 
to find it replaced a few moments after- 
ward. The following suggestion meets the 
case : Take a piece of common yellow 
kitchen soap, and pass the moist hands over 
it 2 or 3 times, just enough to get a slight 
lather. This, when mixed with the water, 
dispels all gelatine froth as though by 
magic and no harmful effects follow. A 
slight trace of soapy lather will counteract 
a large quantity of gelatine froth. — The 
News Monger. 



What will prevent ferrotype plates, that 
are used for squeegeeing, from adhering? 
D. B., Plymouth, Pa. 

ANSWER. 

Make the following waxing solution and 
when your ferro plates are cleaned and 
polished drop a few drops on each and 
rub around vigorously with a woolen cloth 
until an almost unperceptible coating is se- 
cured. Then squeegee your prints on and 
they will never stick. Repeat at each use of 
plates. 

Dissolve 2 drams yellow 'beeswax shav- 
ings in 1 ounce each of ether, alcohol 
(95 per cent.) and benzole. Shake till dis- 
solved and keep tightly corked. — Editor. 



Will you kindly give me a little in- 
formation in regard to coloring photos? 
I mean, to take the print after it is made 
and color the dress, hair, eyes, etc. What 
kind of colors are used, and what is used 
to soften the print, so it will take the color? 
How are colors applied, etc.? 

W. W. Noble, Yazoo City, Miss. 

ANSWER. 

Use Marshall's electric colors and his 
medium to apply before coloring, so the 
color will spread. The colors and full in- 
structions are to be had of A. G. Marshall, 
625 Vanderbilt avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. — 
Editor. 



Will you please give me formula for 
salting solution in making plain salted pa- 
per? F. C. Wilbour, Austin, Minn. 

ANSWER. 

Ammonium chloride 60 grains 

Gelatine 20 grains 

Water 20 ounces 

Dissolve by gentle heat and soak paper 
in the solution 2 minutes. — Editor. 



RECREATION. 81 



If it isn't an Eastman, it isn't a Kodak. 

KODAK 

PROGRESS 
COMPETITION 

To show the Progress of the Kodaker in the field of 
photographic art and to demonstrate the technical 
superiority of pictures made with our instruments 
and our film, we offer 

$4,000.22 in Prizes 

for the best amateur work made with the Kodak 
and Brownie Cameras. 

The prize list includes $2000.00 in Cash and 
$2000.00 in Kodaks. 



THE, JUDGES. 

We have been fortunate in securing the services of three gentlemen to act 
as judges, whose reputations are a guarantee that the work will be intelligently 
and impartially passed upon. All of them are well known by their work with the 
camera and all have had previous experience on juries of award. They are, 
indeed, at the forefront among the photographers of this country : 

RUDOLF EICKEMEYER, JR., 
CHARLES I. BERG, 
HENRY TROTH. 



Prize Contest circular free at any Kodak dealer's or by mail. 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

Kodaks, $5 to $35. Rochester, N. Y. 



S2 



RECREATION. 




" A Perfect Picture* ' 

IF I t' s made wit h a 

Century 



I HE 15 years experience in the scientific con- 
struction of Cameras, which are back 
of CENTURYS mean everything to the 
purchaser. More real merit— more new features 
and a higher standard of quality than any 
others without exception. 10 different models, 
$900 to $90.00. SPECIAL CAMERAS FOR 
SPORTSMEN. Our new catalogue contains 
information of value to every photographer. 
Mailed free upon request. 



Made with a Century GraDd. By Fr d L. Wallace, 1 hi a. 



Century Camera Co. 

Rochester, New York 

Mention Recreation. 



It is all in the Lens 



Any old box will answer the purpose if it 
does not leak light; but you must have a 
fine lens to make a fine picture. 

You can get 

A Royal Anastigmat 
Lens, 4x5, Series No. 1 

Made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, 
New York, 

And listed at $45, 
For 40 yearly subscrip- 
tions to RECREATION 

You can get any other lens made by this 
Company on the basis of one subscription 
to each dollar of the list price of the lens. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in 
soliciting furnished on application. 



A NOT UNUSUAL HEART SHOT. 

B. and I were hunting deer some years 
ago near French river. While returning 
to camp one evening, I shot a rabbit, and 
was carrying it, walking a little behind my 
friend. Suddenly B.'s rifle went to his 
shoulder, and I saw a large buck standing 
about 6o yards in front of us. As my com- 
panion was a good shot, I remained mo- 
tionless, feeling sure it was his meat. At 
the crack of the rifle the deer started, his 
first jump taking him out of sight. "I got 
him!" cried B., "I shot him through the 
heart." "Are you sure?" I asked. "Yes," 
he said, "I had a good bead on him." We 
went to where the buck had been standing 
and found his trail, but no blood. After 
beating about awhile B. cried, "Here is 
blood !" and so there was, though but little. 
We followed the blood stain, which grew 
plainer at every step. Presently we came 
to the spot where I shot the rabbit, and it 
dawned on us that we had been following 
our own back trail by the rabbit's blood. 
Returning to the place where we saw the 
deer, we found B.'s bullet embedded in a 
tree. B. seldom speaks of a heart shot 
since then ; but when he does, the boys 
laugh. 

F. W. Foreshew, Sheguiandat, Ont. 

IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO 
NATURE, READ RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



xvn 







I 

li 
11 
ii 

II 
II 

I 



is practically unlimited* There is no branch of photogra- 
phy from the racing horse to the sleeping child, in which 
f the efficiency of the Premo has not been exemplified* Premo 
cameras are made in all styles, from the simple instrument 
at $U.OO, to the most complete appliance known to photo- 
graphic science at $250*00 One of the most popular Premos 
for the amateur or professional is Pony Premo No* 7, 
priced at $45*00. Using either plates or films, especially 
equipped for the highest attainments, Pony Premo No. 7 
represents the ideal instrument for universal use. Ask 
your dealer to show you 
one or send for the 
Premo Book. 
FREE. 



II 



i 






it 

1 
ii 

li 

II 

m 



n# 






Dept. F. ROCHESTER OPTICAL CO. 

Rochester, N. Y, 




m\\\\\\\\\\m\\\\\\\\\\^^^ 






sS^») 



XV111 



RECREATION. 





ANSCHUTZ 

CAMERA 

OS LESS LIGHT THAN ANY OTHER 

"1171LL make pictures when others fail, and 
" ™ will take anything others can* Most 
compact, lightest and most complete* A wonder- 
ful instrument for obtaining full-timed results 
when^speed is essential* Fitted with the famous 

Goerz Lens and Focal Plane Shutter 

Catalogue free from your 
dealer or 

C. P. Coerz Optical 
Works c ^kp 

Room27 52 E. Union Sq., New York 

MAIN OFFICE: 

Berlin, Friedenau, Germany 



^TQ 




There are Many ANASTIGM ATS Bvl 0n, y 0nc 




Ve 




&fn 



A Convertible Lens 

Some Anastigmats 
are better than others 
but noneis betterthan 
the VERASTIGMAT 

We don't ask you to 
believe it because we 
sa.y so, but we would 
thank you to test the 




A Wide Angle Lens 

VERASTIGMAT 

side by side with all 
others before you buy 
Send for our book- 
let; it is instructive 
and interesting, and 
to be had for the ask- 
ing. Mention Recreation 



piaunattan optical Co. of N. Y., W - - Crosslin, i J. 



RECREATION. 




PAMOR^Mfc 

CAMERA 



Easy 
„ to use! 
Easy, 
to buy! 








PERFECTION IN PHOTOGRAPHY 

Has been secured by the use of the Al- Vista Camera. 
It produces the entire panoramic view — from the 
limit of vision on the left to the extreme joint on the 
right. The Al-Vista Camera is compact : easy to 
use, sure in action. It is sold on its merits: we dem- 
onstrate this by selling you one ON EASY PAYMENTS. 
Ask us for a catalog : select the camera you wish, fill up the 
blank we shall send you, and references being satisfactory we 
will at once send you a camera — pay weekly or monthly in 
sums to suit your purse. The camera is no longer a luxury: 
the demands of modern progress make a good camera a 
necessity ; we make it easy for you to get the best. 

THE MULTISCOPE & FILM CO. 

136 Jefferson Street, Burlington, Wis. 



ARNOLD. N.Y, 



XX 



RECREA 



No. 3 FOLDING 
WENO HAWK=EYL 




A DAYLIGHT LOADING FILM 
CAMERA OF THE, HIGHEST 
TYPE, IN POCKET FORM. 

Rapid Rectilinear lens, pneumatic release auto- 
matic shutter, with iris diaphragm stops, brilliant 
reversible finder, focusing scale, and tripod 
sockets for both vertical and horizontal pictures. 
May be fitted with a glass plate attachment at 
slight extra cost. 



&f>e Perfect Pocket Camera 

No. 3 Folding Weno HawK=Eye, with double R. R. lens, not loaded, $15.00 
Do., with single fixed focus achromatic lens, .... 13.50 



Hawk-Eye Catalog at 
your dealers or by mail. 



BLAIR CAMERA COMPANY, 

Rochester 9 N. Y. 






(joerz Trieder Binocvilacrs 




An article that ap~ 
peals to almost every 
reader of ^Recreation. 
Take one with you, 
no matter where you 
go— on la.nd or seat, 
in forest or mountains. 

Compact. Durable. 

Light in weight, finely 
finished, of unique de- 
sign with great magni- 
fication ^>ower, they 
are unequalled. 



Field of Vietu 11 per cent, greater than any other 

Catalogue free from yovir deaJer or 

C. P. GOER.Z OPTICAL WORKS 

M *l£r»riederv a u. Germany. Room 27, S2 E. UNION SQ., NEW YORK 



RECREATION. 



xxi 



IT'S ALL IN THE LENS 

Series V Long Focus Korona 

Can be used with equal facility for 
everyday, hand-camera 

Snap Shots 

Photographing Distant Views 

Copying 

or other work needing bellows ca- 
pacity, and also with wide-angle 
lenses for interiors and kindred 
subjects. 

ONE CAMERA DOES IT ALL 



Every adjustment is a marvel 
of simplicity and mechanical 
ingenuity, and many of them 
are found exclusively on the 
Korona. 

Note our patent auxiliary 
bed for use with wide-angle 
lenses, and compare it with 






the clumsy methods used to obtain this 
result on other cameras. 

Our patent automatic swing back op- 
erates from the center according to correct 
principles. 

KORONA LONG FOCUS 

Has a Convertible Lens, Automatic Shut- 
ter, and numerous other special advantages. 

Catalogue gives full information 

Gundlach Optical Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Mention Recreation 



XX11 



RECREATION. 



CHANGE 




.. .. „ 



Made, not by an experienced opti= 
cian, but by anyone wearing eye= 
glasses, with the aid of Gall & 
Lembke's new Temple Attachment 



Nea-t Simple 

Convenient H^ndy 

Every wearer of eyeglasses wishes occasionally 
that his pince-nez were spectacles. Spectacles 
stay on, however violent one's exercise; however 
warm the weather. With this little device you 
carry practically both eyeglasses and spectacles 
in one ordinary case. 

Automobile and horseback riding, hunting, 
fishing, ping pong, cycling, yachting, golf, tennis, 
and all other athletic exercises can be indulged 
in with perfect safety to your glasses. 

Perhaps you keep one pa'r of spectacles for 
just such uses. Sometimes you forget them; 
sometimes thev are broken. The Temple At- 
tachment will fit any of your eyeglasses. Kept 
in your regular case, they always are on hand. 
Price per pair in nickel - - 50 cents 
Price per pair in gold plated - 75 cents 

Send for circular. 

CALL & LEHBKE 




21 Union Square 



NEW YORK 



Are You an Amateur 
Photogr©LpKer ? 




If so, would you like a Camera that will photograph 

A whole range of mountains 
A ii' hot e sweep of river 
A whole army 

A whole fleet of ships 
A whole city 

Or any other vast stretch of scenery or moving 
objects? THE SWING LENS DOES IT. 

15he AL VISTA 

Is the thing. It lists at $30. 
One of the greatest inventions of the age. 
Given as a premium for 12 Suoscuptions. 

For particulars address 

RECREATION, $Sft& S S« 



Has any reader of Recreation ever shot 
a turkey with a soft nose 30-30 bullet? 
If not, don't try it. While hunting in 
Ilexico last fall I found a bunch of 30 
or 40 turkeys led by an immense gobbler. 
As they were coming in my direction, I 
crouched behind a rock and waited. When 
they were near I opened fire and soon had 
4 birds down. When I went to gather 
my game I found the big gobbler blown 
to bits, there being nothing left but his 
breast. The other birds had been on high- 
er ground and I had undershot, breaking 
a leg of each. As turkeys can not fly from 
the ground without a running start, I soon 
caught the cripnles. At camp that night 
I explained to the boys that I had pur- 
posely shot my birds in the leg in order 
to save some of the meat. 

Dr. I. T. Bush, El Paso, Tex. 



Last night when I came home I found 
a package addressed to me. On opening 
it I found one of the finest hunting knives 
I ever saw, also a sheath for it. Kind- 
ly accept my hearty thanks for this pre- 
mium. I shall try to send you more sub- 
scriptions soon, and get more of your fine 
premiums. 

A. R. Shafer, Baltimore, Md. 



Recreation gives me much pleasure. I 
take much interest in camera work, also 
in hunting and fishing. 

E. C. Chandler, Deep River, Conn. 



RECREATION. 



xxm 



MILLEN'S 

French Satin Jr. 



THE STANDARD blue print 
paper of the world — not the 
ordinary kind, but a perfect paper 
for photographic work, perfectly 
made and perfectly packed in 
sealed tubes. The delight of pro- 
fessional and amateur 



Photographers 



There is no better, it is the best. 
A postal card will bring full infor- 
mation of French Satin Jr. and our 
other photographic specialties. 

THE J. C. MILLEN, M. D. 

Photographic Chemical Co. 

DENVER, COLORADO 




Tfie Paper for Printing by Gaslight 



If jour d ealer cannot supply you send 20<forone 
dozen 4X5 size with developer. 

THE ANTHONV&SCOVILL CO, 

(22 -124 Fifth Avenue I7th'3l8th Sts Atlas BIock,RandolphSt®wab«h Ave 
NEW YORK CHICAGO 



Royal in Name Royal in Quality 



-ARE" 



ROYAL ANASTIGMAT LENSES 



For 

Landscapes 

Ocean Views 

Mountain 

Scenery 

Architecture 

Interiors 

and 

Portraits 

USE 

A 

ROYAL 




Reduced from 5x7 Print made with a Series II 



Catalogue Upon Request if You Mention Recreation 

ROCHESTER LENS CO, Rochester, N. Y.. U. S, A, 



xxiv RECREATION. 



If it isn't an Eastman, it isn't a Koda%< 





A new folding 

KODAK 

for the pocket— almost for the vest pocket, 
at six dollars. Makes pictures l^x 2 l A inches, 
loads in daylight, has a fine meniscus lens, 
brilliant finder, automatic shutter— in fact, has 
the "Kodak quality" all the way through. 

No. Folding Pocket Kodak, for pictures \tyk x 2}^ 

inches, = = = = = = $6.00 

Transparent Film Cartridge, 12 exposures, \y% x 2%, .25 

Do., 6 exposures, = = = = = = ,15 

EASTMAN KODAK CO. 

Catalogue free at the dealers 

or by mail. rvOCnesier, 1M. I • 

$4,000.00 in prizes for Kodak and 'BroWnie Pictures, 



RECREATION. 



XXV 



Photographic Talks. No. 1. 



Dry Plates 



No matter how perfect the camera; how 
fine the lens; how expert the operator, the 
success of Photography depends on the plate. 

Until to-day, the trend of plate making 
has been to produce a different plate for 
every sort of service — an orthochromatic 
plate for subjects of color; a non-halation 
plate for windowed interiors; a slow plate for 
copying, and a fast plate for snap shots. 

While acknowledging the value of these 
special plates, we have, in 25 years' experi- 
ence as the largest plate camera makers of the 
world, come to recognize the growing need 
for one dry plate of general utility; a plate that 
would render, as far as necessary, the value 
of colors; that would eliminate, as nearly as 
possible, the flare of halation; that would give 
the fullest depth, the most delicate definition, 
and yet be rapid enough for high speed work. 

We believe we have solved this problem, 
and supplied the need for a universal plate. 
With this knowledge we now introduce 



THE 
"ROCHESTER ?=, 

ROC 

^ DRY PLATE ^ 



Sold in all sizes 1 y a!l dealers. Made only by 

ROCHESTER OPTICAL & CHMERCQ. CO., Rochester, %Y. 

Largest Plate Camera makers in the Ivorld, 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 



WESTWARD WITH THE IMPERIAL. 
STAR. ' 

The desire to live a little longer has 
led me to quit the unwholesome climate of 
the national capital, the house where wife 
and children dwell, and to wander across 
the continent to the mountains of Colorado, 
hoping to find in their quiet solitudes, un- 
der their cloudless heaven, a new lease of 
life. 

r\ journey twice interrupted and delayed 
brought me via the C. & O. and the Big 
Four to Chicago, where I procured pas- 
sage over the Rock Island to Denver. It 
was a kind friend, whose goodness has 
often, heretofore, been a gladness to me, 
who directed me to that road. I take this 
means to thank him for his kindnesses ; 
not this alone, but many others. I shall 
carry to the grave a grateful sense of all 
his goodness. 

How shall I tell the readers of Recrea- 
tion how well the officers and employes 
of the Rock Island know the meaning of 
courtesy? I have not always fared sump- 
tuously at the hands of railroad men, 
though I have many times, in the course 
of much travel, found friends and genial 
companions among them; but I record my 
grateful thanks for a kindliness which be- 
gan with John Sebastian, and ran through 
every officer I met and through all the 
train crews, even to the dusky porter on 
the chair car. This diluted son of Ham 
was as watchful of the passengers under 
his care as if he had been father of us all. 
The conductors between Chicago and Den- 
ver were changed several times, but from 
their uniform kindness and courtesy they 
might all have been one. 

The train was of the latest, roomiest 
vestibule pattern, and the roadbed was per- 
fect, the train bowling alonor as smoothly 
as if it ran on a track of glass. We left 
the station in Chicago at 10.00 p. m., made 
the long run of 1,083 miles, and pulled into 
the Union depot at Denver on the second 
morning at 7.45, not a second late. 

In the great station in Chicago is a res- 
taurant where one may find an excellent 
meal, splendidly served, at a reasonable 
price, and on the train is the dining car 
where one may get as good a meal as at 
Delmonico's at a price so fair as to sur- 
prise him. A lady, next seat in front of 
me, said she got an excellent breakfast for 
35 cents. 

Let me advise every brother of the trig- 
ger or the quill, to trust himself, in case 
he should follow the Western star, to 
the Rock Island. He will not regret it. 

In the years gone with the past, I picked 
up a smattering of palmistry. I had scraped 
a casual acquaintance with a fellow trav- 
eler, and offered to read his future if per- 
mitted. My offer was gladly accepted and 
a brief sketch of the future was rapidly 
read off. A young lady sitting in the next 



seat forward, overhearing my forecast, 
timidly turned to me, thrust her little hand 
between the chairs, and asked me to read 
her fortune. I could not well decline and 
when I had completed that task I found 
another hand held down over my shoulder 
with the request, "Tell mine, too." I 
chanced to hit her past correctly, and gave 
her a flattering picture of her future. She 
was a mother in Israel, nearly or quite to 
the half century mark. When I finished 
her reading I found the whole end of the 
car packed with a throng, all anxious to 
try their fortune. Some were as gray as 
I ; others were not yet out of their teens, 

"Standing with reluctant feet 
Where the brook and river meet." 

Some were married, some wanted to be, 
and some perhaps wished they were not. 
For half an hour I held levee. Even the 
staid conductor held out his kindly palm, 
and the brakeman wanted to put his for- 
tune to the test. Last of all came the por- 
ter, patient, polite, waiting till all the 
"white folks" had been read, holding to 
me his broad and generous hand. I am 
glad to say that he seemed happy over the 
little I could - tell. One elderly lady, from 
the extreme front of the car rushed to me, 
held out a dainty hand, evidently unac- 
quainted with toil, and asked for her horo- 
scope. I chanced ae-ain to tell her of her 
past, and in prediction told her that she 
was the mother of a young man in whose 
future her heart was deeply concerned. 

"Yes," said she, "what can you tell me 
of his future?" 

"Madam," said I, "it ends in tragedy." 
I was sorry in an instant, for she caught 
her hand away, and went forward to her 
seat. I think she must have left the car 
at the next stop, for I soon missed her. 
The time passed plpeasantly en route, and 
so I am housed once more in the Rockies, 
where the skies are bluer and the breezes 
sweeter, to me at least, than anywhere else 
on earth. 

W. H. Nelson, Boulder, Colo. 



I wish Recreation would help do away 
with pump guns for hunting deer. There 
are fellows who will go to the woods after 
deer with a gun full of bullets, and at the 
first move in the brush begin shooting and 
continue until the magrzine is empty. If 
they had to hunt with a single shot rifle 
they would not shoot so recklessly, but 
would wait for a sure shot, and thus, per- 
haps, avoid killing a fellow hunter. 

C. R. M., Trempaleau, Wis. 



IN ANSWERING ADS PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



XXVll 




Weather 

Food. 



Food for hot weather is an important question. People can feel from ten to 
twenty degrees cooler than their neighbors, by avoiding fats, cutting down the butter 
ration and indulging more freely in fruits and food easy of digestion. 

An ideal meal is Grape-Nuts with cream, some fruit, a couple of slices of whole 
wheat bread, and a cup of Postum Food Coffee, hot, or if cold a little lemon juice 
squeezed in; Grape-Nuts can be made the principal food of the meal, because it is a con- 
centrated food, one pound having as much nourishment — that the system will absorb — as 
ten pounds of beef, in addition to which it is already cooked and ready to serve. Delicious 
hot weather entrees and desserts are easily made. 

Try this entree -.—(Salmon Croquettes vi1h Grape-Kuts.)-Dram a can of salmon and mash the fish fine; add two 
beaten e<rss, four tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one cup of bread crumbs, one-half cup of finely ground Grape-Nuts, 
six tablespoonfuls of milk; salt, cayenne pepper and a pinch of mace. Beat to a paste. Lay small spoonfuls first into 
beaten etrsr, then in cracker dust, and shape into croquettes. Fry a delicate brown in deep fat, and serve with 
mayonnaise dressing. 

A dessert for a warm day:— (Fi-vited G?*ape-Nuts.)— Chop together enough pineapple, bananas and peaches to make 
one cupful. In a dainty dish place a layer of this chopped fruil ; then one of Grape-Nuts, and repeat. Over all turn a 
cuptul of whipped cream, let stand on ice ten minutes and serve. 

A booklet of excellent recipes is found in every package of Grape-Nuts and many easy 
warm weather dishes can be made that are not only nutritious but pleasing to the palate. - 

A person can pass through weather that may be intensely hot, in a comfortable man- 
ner, if the food be properly selected and the above suggestions can be put into practice- 
wit h most excellent results. 



m 



■ 




xxviii 



RECREATION. 





Heals Cuts, Abrasions, Hang- 
Nails, Chapped and Split Lips 
or Fingers, Burns, Blisters, 
etc. Instantly Relieves Chil- 
blains, Frosted Ears, 
Stings of Insects, Chafed 
or Blistered Feet, Cal=> 
lous Spots, etc., etc. 
A coating on the sensitive parts will 

Erotect the feet lrom being chafed or 
listered by new or heavy shoes. 
Applied with a brush and immediate- 
ly dries, forming a to ugh, transparent, 
Colorless waterproof coating. 

Hechanics, Sportsmen, 
Bicyclists, Golfers' Etc. 

are all liable to bruise, scratch or 
scrape their skin. "NEW SKIN" will 
heal these injuries. Will ^ot Wash 
off, and after it is applied the 
injury is forgotten, as 'VNEW SKIN" 
makes a temporary new skin until 
the broken skin is healed under it. 

BACH 

Pocket Size (Size of Illustration) • • lOe. 
Family Size ........ £5c. 

2 oz. Botts. (for Surgeons and Hospitals) 50c. 

A.t the Druggists, or we will 

mail a package anywhere in the Uni- 
ted States on receipt of price. 



DOUGLAS MFG. GO, 

Dept. W 

107 Fulton St. New York 



Brorvze Mede>J, Pa^ris Exposition, 1900 

Collan Waterproof 
Shoe Dressing 

Hvmtirvg Boots made perma.rvently 
watertight, soft and flexible, never water- 
soaked, hard a.rvd shrunken. 

Dry feet for Sportsmen, Golf Players, 
Mountain Climbers, Explorers and others 
obliged to traverse -wet and snowy fields 
or stand about in water. 

Great for all -winter footwear and 
school shoes. Prevents cracking — shoes 
outwear others 3 or 4 times. 
A boon to ladies .wearing thin-soled shoes. 
Fine for Saddles, Bridles, all Har- 
ness. An unequalled Gun Oil, prevents 
rvist, cleans, wipes close. 

Sold in tins, Black 25c and 45c; Yellow 
(for fair leather), 30c and 55c, f. o. b. N. Y. 
Gross lots and bulk prices special. Sold by 
dealers generally. Write us direct if your 
dealer doesn't keep it. 

J. R. B\jckelew,Sole Agt. 

Ill Chambers St., N. Y. 

Mention Recreation. 



Health** 1 Strength 

™« & Pxmehirvt ? 



Can be 
attacked to 
a. door, wall 
or window casing. 

Noiseless *&<* 
Rapid 

Space 6x8 iaches 
Weight '7* lbs 

1\incKingBagCloves s 1 .25 

Price 

delivered <£ fZi 0*J 

complete MK V/« » 

Childrervs Size 

, delivered <Jt A_ 5 O . 

complete "*P ^~« * 



• .- 
4i 



■ 



, — -f ^ — ^ a MOANING f»t«CUI 

H.D.Cripperv 

52Bro«iw^, New York . «£2£E 



How is your Mnscle ? 



Would you like to build it up ? 



How are your Lungs ? 

Would you like to expand them? 

How is your Circulation ? 

Would you like to improve that ? 

If so, send me 10 yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation, accompanied by a money order for $10, 
and I will send you a new 

Professional Punching Bag 

made by H. D. CRIPPEN, No. 52 Broadway, 
New York, and listed at $6.95. 



There is a frame with the bag that you can 
attach to a door casing, a window casing or a 
wall, or a board fence, or anywhere else you 
may see fit to put it, and you will thus have a 
small gymnasium of your own. The Crippen 
bag is one of the liveliest ever devised, and if 
you will put 20 minutes a day on it, for a month, 
you will rind a wonderful improvement in your, 
muscle and your health. 

Sample copies of Recreation, for use in can- 
vassing, will be mailed fret. 



RECREATION. 



XXIX 



Blood Poison 
Cured Free. 



The Remedy is Sent Absolutely 

Free to Every Man or Woman 

Sending Name and Address. 





Chief of Staff and Head Consulting Physician of the State Medical Institute; 



A celebrated Indiana Physician has discovered 
the most wonderful cure for Blood Poison ever 
known. It quickly cures all such indications as 
mucous patches in the mouth, sore throat, copper 
colored spots, chancres, ulcerations on the body 
and in hundreds of cases where the hair and 
eyebrows had fallen out and the whole skin was a 
mass of boils, pimples and ulcers, this wonderful 
specific has completely changed the whole body 
into a clean, perfect condition of physical health. 

Wm. McGrath, 48 Guilford St. .Buffalo, N.Y.,says: 

" I am a well man to-day, where a year ago I was 
a total wreck. Several doctors had failed to cure 
me of blood poison. I was rid of my sores and my 
skin become smooth 'and natural in two weeks, and 



after completing the treatment there was not a sore 
or pimple on my body, and to-day I am absolutely 
well." 

Every railroad running into Ft. Wayne brings 
scores of sufferers seeking this new and marvelous 
cure, and to enable those who cannot travel to 
realize what a truly marvelous work the doctor i9 
accomplishing, they will send free to every sufferer 
a free trial package of the remedy so that everyone 
can cure themselves in the privacy of their owri 
home. This is the only known treatment that 
cures this most terrible of all diseases. Address the 
State Medical Institute, 3693 Elektron Building, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind. Do not hesitate to write at once, and 
the free trial package will be sent sealed in plain 
package. 



xxxii 



RECREATION. 




o»o w*o to 

a a ess 

|g«0g 

■2 C 1! U H 

*; bC-t-> d ^ 
2 IM U-l ^ o 

O 0*5 JJ *• 

'3 "?*— C <o 

H 5 « js ** 



This 
Patent 

recommends itself and re- 
minds you that on receipt 
of your name and ad- 
dress we will mail you our 

Illustrated 
Catalogue 

containing samples of 






Corduroy, Canvas, Macintosh, Flannels, etc., 
also cuts, descriptions and blanks for measurement. Address 

H. J. Upthegrove & Son, 

No. 2 Wood Street, VALPARAISO, IND. 




Stallman's 

Dresser 

Trunk 



Have you seen one? It is 
up-to-date. Think of it, 
everything' within reach. No 
heavy trays, but light, smooth 
drawers. Holds as much and costs 
no more than a good box trunk. 
Hand riveted, almost indestructible. 
Once tried, always recommended. 
Sent C. O. D., privilege examination. 
«C. Stamp for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 

F. A. STALLMAN. 

87 W. Spring St., Columbus, O 



You are constantly receiving reports 
which point to the advance of the game- 
protection sentiment and the agency of 
Recreation in furthering it. Here is one 
which to me means much. Sanbornton, N. 
EL, our summer home, is not in the back- 
woods of the State, but is a rural hamlet 
20 miles from Concord. L. A. S. posters 
have been put up in many places, and your 
magazine has gone to many homes in the 
vicinity. Before this happened the occa- 
sional deer which entered the region from 
the North mysteriously disappeared, and 
their numbers showed no increase. More 
recently they have appeared in all the sur- 
rounding territory, and bid fair to multiply. 
A few weeks ago 4 young men put their 
dogs on a deer track and killed the deer. 
A deputy game warden took up the case, 
and eventually the men were fined $100 
each and sentenced to 6 months' imprison- 
ment. This punishment was, however, re- 
mitted on the killing of the dogs. At the 
same time the lesson was a salutary one, 
and it is safe to say the deer will go un- 
molested in this section. I believe Recre- 
ation's part in the matter can hardly be 
over estimated. 

Erne^sj: &y£§&U, Worcester, Mass. 

IN ANSWERING ADS PLEASE 
MENTION RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



XXXlll 



THE AMERICAN 

BIRD MAGAZINE 



Profusely illustrated with PHOTOGRAPHS 
OF LIVE WILD BIRDS, fresh, interesting 
and instructive 



BIRD 
LITERATURE 

Everything Original 



Each number will 
contain 

Ten Birds 
in Natural 
Colors. 

for identification. 




MONTHLY 

$1.00 A YEAR ; single copies, io cents. 
Mention Recreation and send for copy. 

AMERICAN ORNITHOLOGY 

WORCESTER, MASS. 



HAYDEN'S IHPROVED 

POCKET WATER FILTER 

A necessity for 

Sportsmen, Hunters, 
Wheelmen and Tourists ! 




~ Filter and Mouth Piece made of fine, hard rubber. 

Two feet of rubber tube. 
' Can be carried in the pocket or tool bag. 

Very light and neatly made. 

Will last many years. 

jFilters through charcoal. 

After repeated experiments the little filter is as 
•nearly perfect as it can be made The barrel, or filter, 
is a trine smaller than heretofore, and the water filters 
through charcoal. This is a decided improvement 
and absolutely filters. 

Price, 75 cents, postpaid. 
€HAS. A. H1TDEX, 

OXFORD, OHIO. 



"The Stretched 

Forefinger 

of all Time" 

is on 
the dial of an 

Elgin 
Watch 



— the world's standard 
for pocket timepieces. 
Perfect in construction; 
positive in perform- 
ance. Sold by every 
jeweler in the land; 
fully guaranteed. Illus- 
trated art booklet free. 

ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO. 

Elgin, Illinois. 



I 
I 



To load an old-fashioned revolver t<5 se- 
cure best results, use a small charge of 
powder and a close-fitting ball. Take a 
small piece of brass tubing to push the ball 
down on powder, as the plunger will not 
seat it deep enough in the cylinder. Do 
not use any wads, and keep the barrel 
clean. 

I have used several different calibers of 
the Stevens No. 44 rifle. For serviceable 
and accurate single shot guns they can not 
be surpassed. Do not expect much from 
a 32 rim fire cartridge ; I would rather have 
a 22 short. Those who want a rim fire for 
long range work should get a 25 caliber. 
They do good work up to 250 yards. 

Fred Vitt, Union, Mo. 



I 



I 



I 



XXXIV 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 

A Book, a Gun, a Camera ) RF _ nfr 

A Sleeping Bag, a Fishing Rod [ ™"i. Uh 
A Reel, a Tent, ) tUb ' 

Subscriptions need not all be sent at once. They 
may be sent in instalments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. When the required number 
is obtained the premium earned will be shipped. 



f 



These Offers are subject to change 
without notice. 



TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation 
at $i each, I will send a copy of Hunt- 
ing in the Great West, cloth ; or a Zar 
Camera, listed at $i; or an Ingersoll Watch 
or Cyclometer, listed at $i ; or a Recreation 
Waterproof Match Box, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $i; or a Shakespeare 
Revolution Bait listed at 75 cents; or a 
Laughlin Fountain Pen ; or a Cartridge Belt 
listed at $2 ; or a dozen Trout Flies, as- 
sorted, listed at $1 ; or a Stonebridge 
Folding Aluminum Lantern, listing at $1.50. 

THREE subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Battle of the Big Hole, cloth; or a 
safety pocket ax, made by W. L. Mar- 
ble and listed at $2.50; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 ; or 4 dozen Carbutt 
plates, 4x5 or 5x7. 

FOUR subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
Camping and Camp Outfits, cloth ; or 
a Primus Oil Stove, listed at $4 ; or an 
Ideal Hunting Knife, made by W. L. Marble 
and listed at $2.50 ; or a .32 caliber Auto- 
matic Forehand Revolver, made by the 
Hopkins & Allen Arms Co. ; or a Gold 
Mounted Fountain Pen. 

FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of Cruis- 
ings in the Cascades, cloth; or a set of Neh- 
ring's Convertible Ampliscopes, listed at 
$5.00; or an Ideal Hunting Knife made by 
W. L. Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a polished 
Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, made by E. W. 
Stiles. 

SIX subscriptions at $1 each, a Haw key e Re- 
frigerating Basket made by the Burlington 
Basket Co. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Big Game of North A merica, or of The 
A merican Book of the Dog, cloth. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a 4 x 5 
Weno Hawk-Eye Camera, made by the 
Blair Camera Co., and listed at $8. 

NINE subscriptions at $1 each, an Acme 
single shot gun, made by the Davenport 
Arms Co., and listed at $8. 

TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4. 50 ; or a Conley 
Combination Hunting Coat, listed at $8 ; or 
a Yawman & Erbe Automatic Reel, listed at 



$6 to $9 ; or a pair of horse hide Hunting 
Boots, made by T. H. Guthrie, Newark, 
N. J., and listed at $10; or a Bristol Steel 
Fishing Rod, listed at $6 or less; or a Single 
Barrel Shot Gun made by Harrington & 
Richardson Arms Co.; or a Waterproof 
Wall Tent 7x7, made by D. T. Aber- 
crombie & Co., and listed at $8; or a canvas 
hunting coat, made by H. J. Upthegrove & 
Son, listed at $8. 

TWELVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Pea- 
body Carbine valued at $12; or a No. 5 
Sidle Telescope Rifle Sight, listed at $18; 
or a Davenport Ejector Gun, listed at $10. 

FIFTEEN subscriptions at $1 each, a Shakes- 
peare Reel, Silver Plated, listed at $15; or a 
set of rabbit plates made by Higgins & Seiter, 
and listed at $8, or a Field Glass made by 
Gall & Lembke. 

TWENTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 14-karat 
Gold Hunting-case Watch, with Waltham 
Movement, listed at $20; or a Repeating 
Rifle, listed at $16 or less ; or an Elita 
single shot gun, made by the Davenport 
Arms Co., and listed at $18. 

TWENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, 
a Shattuck double hammerless gun, listed 
at $25; or a 11-foot King Folding Canvas 
Boat, listed at $38; or a Repeating Rifle, 
listed at $20 or less; or a 4x5 Planatic lens, 
made by the Rochester Lens Co. , and listed 
at $25. 

THIRTY subscriptions al $1 each, a Field 
Glass, made by C. V. Goerz;ora Repeating 
Rifle, listed at $25 or less; or a Waterproof 
Tent, 14^x17, made by D. T. Abercrombie 
& Co., and listed at $25; or a corduroy hunt- 
ing suit, made by H. J. Upthegrove & Son, 
including coat, vest, trousers, and hat, 
listed at $23.75. 

THIRTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 14- 
foot King Folding Canvas boat, listed at $48; 
or a Grade O, Syracuse Gun, made by the 
Syracuse Arms Co., and listed at $30. 

FORTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 
Savage .303 Repeating Rifle ; or a Mullins 
Duck Boat, listed at $20 ; or a No. 
10 Gun Cabinet, made by the West End 
Furniture Co., and listed at $32. 

FORTY- FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Royal 
Anastigmat Lens, 4x5, series I, made by 
Rochester Lens Co., and listed at $45. 

FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a No. 20 
Gun Cabinet, made by the West End 
Furniture Co., and listed at $38. 

SIXTY subscriptions at $1 each, an Ithaca, 
Quality No. 1, plain, double barrel, ham- 
merless breech loading Shot Gun, listed 
at $40. 

ONE HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, a 
high grade Wilkesbarre Shot Gun, with Da- 
mascus barrels, listed at $125. 

TWO HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, 
a strictly first class upright piano, listed at 

$750- 



Address, 

Recreation 



23 West 24th Street 
New York 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 




SHREDDED 

ifwHQLE ]\ I 

T> rnonl 

BISCUIT 

From Natural Food comes health. Nature 
has stored in the whole wheat the necessary 
properties to support perfect teeth, bone, body 
and brain. Mischievous man in making white 
flour, removes a part of these properties. 
Thinking people realize that na.tura.lly 
organized foods make possible nat- 
ural conditions, and that there is 
no other way. 

Whole wheat is a Naturally Organized 
Food, that is, contains all the properties in 
Correct Proportion necessary for the Complete 
Nourishment of man. "Soft cooked" cereals 
are swallowed with little or no mastication 
and, therefore, the teeth are robbed of their 
necessary— natural- exercise, causing weakness 
and decay. Shredded Whole Wheat 
Biscuit being crisp, compels vigorous masti- 
cation and induces the natural flow of sa- 
liva which is necessary for natural digestion. 



The daily use of Shredded Whole Wheat Biscuit builds strong teeth, strong muscles 

and a strong mind. 

Sold By All Grocers. Send for " The Vital Question" Cook Book (free). Address 

THE NATURAL FOOD CO.. Niagara Falls. N. Y. 




jhe(lub 



\- 




Don't be prejudiced against bot- 
tled Cocktails until you have tried 
the Club brand. No better in- 
gredients can be bought than 
those used in their mixing. The 
older they grow the better they 
are, and will keep perfect in any 
climate after being opened. You 
certainly appreciate an old bottle 
of Punch, Burgundy, Claret, 
Whiskey or Brandy, why should 
you not an old bottle of Cocktail ? 
Have you considered it ? Seven 
kinds. All grocers and druggists 
keep them. 



Q. F. HEUBLEIN & BRO., Sole Proprietors. 

29 Broadway, New York, N. Y. Hartford, Conn. Lond 



SESBK 



Xxxvi 



RECREATION. 




THAT 

MORROW 

COASTER 

GKfAT 

III Glt 

One, 
SURD" 



:.No' .bicycle is complete without a COASTlER 
BftAKE. The only brake worth considering is the 

Morrow Coaster BrakeV 

Do not let your, dealer persuade you into buying 
an inferior substitute,, We are pioneers in th6 
manufacture of coaster brakes. We have tbe de- 
vice which embraces every desirable feature, with 
no objectionable ones. While using a HORROW 
you REST AS YOU RIDE. Whether gdas ting 
down hill or riding on the level your wheel' is always 
under perfect control. If your dealer will ! riot L furnish' 
you with a JIORROW COASTER BRAKE advise 
us and we will see that you get one. 

RJde 50 miles, bvit pedaJ only 35 miles. 

Guaranteed to give satisfaction. Price, $4.50. 
300,000 riders used the HORROW last year. A 
free booklet telling you all about it will be sent on re- 
quest. Address ECLIPSE MFG. CO., 

DEPT. N, ELM1RA, N. Y. 



" Nothing so Rare as Resting on Air." 



No 

Other 

Bed, 



anywhere, at 
any price, 
can compare 
with the 




DEFLATED AND ROLLED UP. 

A mattress 75x21 in. makes a 
bundle 7x14 in. and weighs lbs 




Most comfortable a man ever slept 
on. Lightest in existence. Strong, 
durable, guaranteed. At a fair price 
of all sporting goods dealers. 
ASK FOR 1902 PRICE LIST 

Pnevmatic Mattress and Cushion Co. 

4-th Floor 

35 Broadway, New York City 



ORDINARY LIMITS OF VISION. 

At 30 yards a person with ordinary sight 
can distinguish the white of the eye ; at $0 
yards, the eyes can be seen ; at 100 yardsiy 
the body and movements of same can be 
seen and the buttons counted; at 200 yards,. 
the buttons look like faint stripes ; at 300- 1 
yards, the features of the face are distin- 
guishable; at 400 yards, the face appears- 
like a dot, and the movements of the legs- 
and arms are distinct; at 500 yards, the : 
head is visible; at 600 yards, individual 
movements are observed, but details dis- 
appear ; at 700 yards, the movements of 
the legs and arms become indistinct ; at Soo 1 
yards, individual movements can not be : 
observed ; at 900 yards, the head appears- 
like a dot; at 1,000 yards, a line of men ap-- 
pear like a broad, ragged line; at 2.000 ' 
yards, infantry presents a thick line, with' 
a bright one: above it, cavalry a thicker one, 
with an uneven top, and a single man or 
horse looks like a dot. 



I have taken Recreation 4 years and 
have all the numbers placed so I can take 
tbem up at any dull moment. The satis- 
faction I get from your magazine is rai- 
limitedj and its cuts and photographs, axe 
after my 6wn heart. 

Ghasv G. Jones, Dunkirk, N. Y.- 



' ■ m 



Second Kings, 

Fourth Chapter, 

Tenth Verse 



If you read this verse you will find 
the basis for the little story printed 
in The Four-Track News for May, 
which is entitled "The Prophet's 
Chamber." 

The Four-Track News will be sent 
free to any address in the United 
States for one year for 50 cents ; 
single copies, 5 cents. Address 
George H. Daniels, Publisher, Grand 
Central Station, New York. 



FORESTRY. 



xxxvu 



-J\ 



ALLEN'S FOOT EASE 

SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOES 

Allen's Foot=Ease, a powder for the 
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smarting, 
nervous feet, and instantly takes the sting 
outof corns and bunions. It's the great- 
est comfort discovery of the age. 
Makes tight-fitting or new shoes feel easy. 
It- is n certain cure for ingrowing nails, 
sweating, callous and hot, tired, aching feet. 
We have over 30,000 testimonials. TRY 
IT TO-DAY. Sold byall Druggists and 
Shoe Stores, 25c. Do not accept an imi- 
tation. Sent by mail for 25c. in stamps. 

CPCe TRIAIi PACKAGE 

■ f\ 1 1 sen t by mail. 

MOTHER GRAY'S SWEET 

POWDERS* the best medicine for Fe- 
. verish, Sickly Children. Sold by Druggists 
'Oh.WhatRest everywhere. Trial Package FREE. Ad- 

and Comfort!" dress, ALLEN S. OLMSTED, Le Roy, N.Y. 



FREE BOOK, WEAK MEN 

My illustrated nature book on losses, 
varicocele, impotency, lame back, 
free, sealed, by mail. Much valuable 
advice and describes the new DR. 
SANDEN HERCULEX ELEC- 
TRIC BELT. Worn nights. No 
^. drugs. Currents soothing. Used 
^Hdv women also for rheumatic pains, 
etc. 5,000 cures iqoi. Established 
30 years. Advice free. 
Or.G.B. SANDEN, 1165 Broadway, New York 

FREE! 

To each person sending me $i P. O. Money 
Order for subscription to Recreation, I will 
send one 25 -yard Martin's Braided Silk Line, 
one-fourth dozen Trout Flies, one-fourth 
dozen Snelled Hooks, single gut, and one- 
half dozen ringed hooks. My compass offer 
in preceding issues is still open if preferred. 
EDWARD S. ADAMS, Box 536, Manchester, N. H. 

Free: For 1 year's subscription of Rec- 
reation, through me, will give 1 Bromide 
enlargement, any size up to 11x14 inches 
inclusive, from any negative not larger than 
4x5 ; or from photographs. Negatives and 
Photos to be returned to the owner. Here 
is a rare chance to get a large Photo from 
your pet Negative, also Recreation for $1. 
A. F. Evarts, Meriden, Conn. 

For Sale: 12 gauge Lefever Ejector Shot 
Gun, A. Grade. Roy L. Schroder, 

Van Home, la. 





The Business End 

of the 

PRESIDENT 

SUSPENDER 

works in perfect harmony with every bend 
of the body— Kives comfort in any position. 
Every pair guaranteed. If "President" 
is on the buckles its genuine. Trimmings 
cannot rust. Made in all styles— heavy 
and light— also for boys. Price 50c. If not 
to be had at the dealers will be sent post- 
paid on receipt of price. State whether you 
wish them light or dark— wide or narrow. 
C. A. El>GARTON MFG. CO., 
Box 219 B, Shirley, Mass. 



50c. Sheet Music 

Any 6 for 50 cts. 



9c 



ALL POSTPAID. 

My Own Col- 



Schuffling Coon Schottische 
leen. Song. 

Metropolis Two-step. Caprice, Waltz Song. 

Levee Dances. Nonie, Waltz Song. 

Modern Century Girl, March Song. 

Whar De Watermelon Grows, Coon Song. 

Pretty Black Eyed Sue, Waltz Song. 

Catalogue free; contains thousands of pieces, 
all the latest, at the. lowest prices in the world. 

THE C. MTREX MUSIC CO. 
35 West 21st Street, - New York City 



P||P P To everyone who will send in a 
LULL subscription to RECREATION 

II I through me I will give, free, a photo 

" ■■■■■■ of the late President McKinley; or 
of the Esplanade, or any of the buildings at the Pan- 
American Exposition. These photos are all on 
Velox or Aristo paper. The one of President 
McKinley was made September 6th, the day he was 
shot. All prints perfect. F. E. WILKINSON, 
172 Wood lawn Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Eggs Free: To all who send me 3 yearly 
subscriptions to Recreation, at $1 each, I 
will send one sitting of barred Plymouth 
rock eggs. America's best strains. Chas. 
Knisely, Prairie Depot. Ohio. 



A PERFECT FIELD GLOVE 

Made with the seams and wrinkles on the back. A glove that fits as no machine- 
made glove can fit. That cannot rip. That perspiration and weather will not 
harden. That, if soiled, bloody or greasy, may be washed with soap and hot water 
without injury. That is made for comfortable service and at the same time finished 
in the best possible manner. The best grades have white kid facing, silk stitching, 
celluloid fastenings (our own, adjustable to any wrist). Send now, the ad. may not 
appear regularly. 

No, 308 TaLn, and No 109 Dre^b, postpaid in U. S., Canada and Mex., $1.50 
No. 316 " " No 147 " " " " 1.25 

No. 311 '« " No 145 " " " " 1.00 

We make 40 other styles and make gloves to measure. Illustrated booklet 
samples and self-measurement rule on request. Your money back if you want it 

Mention Recreation. 

J. P. LUTHER GLOVE CO., Berlin, Wis. 




XXXV111 



RECREATION, 




GAME 
HEADS 



I have on 
hand a large 
stock of mule 
deer, mountain 
goat, mountain 
sheep and elk 
heads, andean 
satisfy you as 
to both price 
and quality. 



Elk Heads at 

$3500 
and upwards. 




Also 

some fine 
mountain lion 
and bear skin 
rugs. If you 
intend hunt- 
ing big game 
next fall, write 
me for infor- 
mation con- 
cerning the 
game coun- 
try, reliable 
guides, etc. 
Remember that the success of your trip de- 
pends entirely on the guide, and you can't af- 
ford to employ a poor one. Let me aid you. 

A. E. Hammond, 

DARBY, MONT. 

Mention Recreation. 

FREE! 

To any person sending me $1.00 for one year's sub- 
scription to Recreation, I will give free, either 50 en- 
velopes, printed with return card on them, or 50 note- 
heads, printed, or 50 visiting cards. Write plain to 
avoid mistake in printing. 

HENRY NELSON, Agt., 

Eckvoll, flinn. 

THE "DERBY" Mil LOFTS 

Green Spring Avenue, 
ARLINGTON, - MARYLAND. 

Importers and breeders of Speedy, 
Reliable Flying Pigeons in all 

colors. Youngsters from 550-mile stock can be 
shipped same day orders are received at $3.00 
per pair; two pair $5.00. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

In the splendidly equipped 
RABBITRY of Drs. H. R. 
PHILLIPS & WREAN, 
Penn Yan, N. Y., are some 
of the finest 

IMPORTED BUCKS, 

Lord Roberts, Prince of Leeds, Jr., Fashoda, Jr., 
and a fine line of BREEDING DOES at reason- 
able figures and warranted to be correct, young, 

PEDIGREED STOCK, 

$6. for a TRIO during JULY and AUGUST. 

but no later. 

DRS. H. R. PHILLIPS & WREAN, Penn 

Yao»N.Y. „ 4 . B 

Mention Recreation. 





Taxidermist's Materials 

Glass Eyes for Stuffed Birds and Animals 
Oologist's and Entomologist's Supplies 

Send fc. ir. stamps /or Catalogue 

FRED. KAEMPFER 
88 State Street, Chicago, 111. 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

FLORIDA BIRDS 

Collectors will note that many of our species have 
been recently added to A. O. U. list. 

I have fine mounted specimens and skins of the rare 
Ardea occidentalis. Hon. John Lewis Childs' exhibit of 
Game Birds at the last Sportsman's Show should be 
sufficient guarantee of the quality of my work. 

R.. D. HOYT, Taxidermist 

Seven Oaks, Florida- 

FINE MOUNTED GAME HEADS, 
BIRDS, ETC., for sale at unheard-of prices. 
Send 10 cents for photos. 
JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine, 



FLYING SQUIRRELS. 



For a short time 
only I will give a 
pair of these hand- 
some little pets for 2 yearly subscriptions to Recrea- 
tion. For 3 subscriptions I will give a Fox Squirrel, or 
for 6 subscriptions a pair of Fox Squirrels. For 5 sub- 
scriptions I will give a Raccoon. Will collect almost 
anything in the natural history line indigenous to this 
locality in exchange f oryearly subscriptions to Recrea- 
tion, e. F, POPE, 

Colmesneil, Texas 

Huron Indian Work: To any one sub- 
scribing to Recreation through me I will 
give a Bracelet and Ring worked in horse- 
hair, with any small inscription you like, 
your name, etc., woven in it with caribou 
hair ; quite a curiosity, Send along your $1. 
Walter Legare, 518^ John Street, Quebec, 
Canada. 

Established I895. 

GENESEE VALLEY POULTRY YARDS, 

AVON, N. Y. 

S. C. White Leghorns, as white as they 
make them ; bred for good size and laying 
qualities. Stock for sale. Mammoth Pekin 
Ducks, Prize-Winning Barred Rocks, 
Buff Wyandottes. 

Eggs for Hatching, $1 for 15. Guaranteed 75: fertile. 
Write wants. Mention Recreation. 



FREE 



"THE CAMERIST'S GUIDE/' 
ILLUSTRATED IN COLORS 
FROM ACTUAL PHOTOS 

In this book will be found proof of the wonderful 
difference made with NEWCOMB'S BACKING— 
prints of the same subject on backed and unbacked 
plates. Also prints of negatives before and after 
using my PERSULPHATE REDUCER. Pictures 
showing the beautiful professional tone given by 
TRIUMPH TONER, and the Dresden blue to be 
had only with E. W. N. BLUE PRINT TUBES. 
Examples of spotted and unspotted work make this 
book of great value to you. 

E. W. NEWCOMB, Photo Expert 
131 bible: hovse new york city 



RECREATION. 



XXXIX 





THE 



J\eeley 




ure 



L 



Alcohol, 
Opium, 
Tobacco 
Using /p 



Produce each a dis- 
ease having definite 
pathology. The dis- 
ease yields easily tothG 
Treatment as admin- 
istered at the follow- 
ing Keeley Institutes: 



mSm 



A National Institution 

DURING the past twenty years the Keeley treatment has res- 
etted so many thousands of men and women from the drink 
and drug habit that it has made staunch friends in every com- 
munity. Among its ndherents are the most distinguished people 
in the country, including clergymen, physicians, lawyer*. , edi- 
tors, business men and government oflicials. In a word, the 
treatment, by reason of the great good it has done and is doing, 
has become a national institution, with headquarters in many 
States, as appear herein. 



Here are the names of a few well-known people who indorsed and 
recommended the Keeley Treatment : 

Gen. Neal Dow Rev. T. Df.Witt Talmagk 

Col. C. H. Taylor John V. Far well 

Judge-Advocate-Gen. Groesbeck 
Dr. Parkhurst Dr. Edward McGlynn 

Rev. Canon Fleming Rear- Admiral Walker 

Ex-Gov. Claude Matthews 
Frances E. Willard Ex-Gov. John P. Altgeld 

Hon. Luther Laflin Mills Rt. Rev. John Shanlky 

Gen. James W. Forsyth, U. S. A. 
Ex-Gov. Hastings Rev. Dr. Geo. C. Lorimer 



Details of treatment and proofs of its success sent free on application to 
any of the institutes named. 



ALWAYS ADDRESS THE INSTITUTE NEAREST TO YOU. 



Los Angeles, Cal. Crab Orchard, Ky. 
San Francisco, Cal. New Orleans, La. 

1170 Market St. 1626-38 Felicity St. 
West Haven, Conn. Lexington, Mass. 



Carson City, Nev. 
Fargo, N. D. 



Pittsburg, Pa. 

4246 Fifth Ave. 



Washington, D. C. 
211 N. Capitol St. 
Marion, Ind. 
Des Moines, la. 
Dwight, 111. 



Portland, Me. 

Detroit, Mich- 

Grand Rapids, Mich. Portland, Ore. 

Kansas City ,Mo. Philadelphia, Pa 

St. Louis, Mo. 



North Conway, N. H. £ rovidenc !' Rl L 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
White Plains, N. Y. 
Columbus, 0. 



812 N. Broad St. 



Dallas, Tex. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Richmond, Va. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Waukesha , Wis. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Winnipeg, Man. 



"Non-Heredity of Inebriety," by Dr. Leslie E. Keeley, mailed on application. 




Leslie E 



LL.D. 



NIAGARA 



FALLS 



One of the natural wonders of the 
world. A charming place at any sea- 
son of the year, reached from every 
direction by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 

A visit to the Falls is an object 
lesson in geography ; an exhibition of 
landscapes that no painter can equal, 
and a glimpse of the latest develop- 
ments of the industrial world. 



A copy of Four-Track Series No. 9, "Two Days at 
Niagara Falls," will be sent free, postpaid, to any 
address on receint of a two-cent postage stamp, by 
George H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New 
York Central & Hudson River Railroad, Grand 
Central Station, New York. 



SQUIRES' SIBERIAN MOOSE 
HUNTING BOOTS S SHOES 

Made only by HENRY C. SQUIRES <& SON 
20 Cortlandt St., New York 
The leather is waterproof, fine grained, 
tough and pliable. The 
linings are russet calf- 
skin. The soles are 
best waterproof anhy- 
drous oak 1 eat her, 
stitching of silk, Eng- 
lish back stays, bulldog 
toes, extra heavy eye- 
lets, Pratt fasteners 
and hand made 
throughout. Price 
$7.50 net. Short Boots 
$8.50, Knee Boots 
$10, Cavalry Style 
Boots $12. 
Special circular 
giving detailed 
information 
free for the 
asking. 




Mention Recreation. 



xl 



RECREATION, 



Date,. 



190 



G. O. SHIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 23 West 24th St., New York. 
Herewith find $1.00 for which please send me RECREATION one year 



beginning with. 



.number. 



Name,. 



Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS, FILL OUT. AND SEND IN. 



1 THE TETON GUIDES' 



ASSOCIATION. 

■$£ The attention of sportsmen is called to The 

«{3 Teton Guides' Association of Jackson's Hole, 

«{X Wyo., where there is plenty of big game, elk, 

«{X deer, antelope, mountain-sheep and bear, and 

«£j numerous small fur-bearing animals. Trout fish- 

■$L ing in abundance. 

-$Z Hunting parties outfitted and guided by compe- 

■£2 tent guides at fair and equitable prices, through 

-yJ Yellowstone Park and game regions of Jackson's 

«£j Hole. For information, address 

| Secretary Teton Guides' Association, 

f JACKSON, WYOMING. 






THE RECREATION OF YOUR LIFE. 

I WILL accompany, direct, furnish camp outfit and 
camp pround on my own island in upper Fitnch 
River. Canada, for four or five gentlemen sportEnaen, 
(one physician) from July 15th till ,Sept. 5tl, for my ex- 
penses, for the trip. Or, I will act in above capacity and 
in addition lurnish transportation and eveiy other neces- 
sary expense of the entire trip lor the tin e from 
Cleveland and return lor $175.00 each. The above will 
include special steamer service, once a week from North* 
Bay, to our camp, with mail and provisions. AIfo a 
guide and oarsman and rowboat, lor each two perse ns 
everyday, a cook, provisions and every attention ex- 
pected in tent life. Grouse and duck season opens 
Sept. 1st. Trout, Green and Black Bass, Pike, Pickerel' 
and Muscalonge season open entire time, aid in the 
numberless rapids and bays there are waiting lor fly, 
bait or troll more strikes for the fisherman than any 
other section of this continent. Camp ground is 40 miles 
from white settlement and has never been fished by the 
public. The scenery is most rural and beautilul. The 
banks are timbered with scattered pineamonp the rocks. 
No mud. I will give reference in return lor relerence it 
desired. Write me care Sporting Goods Department, 
The Geo. Worthington Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

J. B. HALL. 



RELICS OF A DISA 

BUFFALO SKULLS 



PPE2ARING RACE 

WITH POLISHED OR 
UNPOLISHED HORNS 



Also polished or unpolished horns in pairs or single. Polished horns tipped with incandescent 
electric lights; polished hunting horns; mirrors hung in polished horns, etc. These are decided 
novelties and are in great demand for sportsmen's dens, offices, club-rooms, halls, etc. Send for 
illustrated catalog. Mention RECREATION. 

E. W. STILES, 141 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 



APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE L. A, S* 

ARTHUR F. RICE, Secretary L. A. S., 23 W. 24th St., New York, 

Dear Sir: Enclosed $i for membership fee for one year. 

I certify that I am eligible to membership in the L. A. S. under the 
provisions of the constitution, and refer to 2 League members (or to 3 g 
other reputable citizens) named hereon. S 



Name. 



P=i 



Street or P. O. Box- 
City or Town 



Detach this, fill out and send in. 



RECREATION. 



xli 



SURE ®HOT 




DESTROYS 
WORMS 





The puppy is liable to destruction from worms. 'Tis the critical period 
in a dog's life. Canine worms meet "sure" destruction when 



SURE SHOT 



is administered. After that, it builds up the growing dogs constitution, 
develops bone and muscle. It makes thin, puny and weak puppies plump, 
animated and strong. 50c. by mail, prepaid. 

Sergeant's Condition Pilis 

are the best liked and easiest to give of all alteratives and tonics. Incidentally 
any disease that a dog is likely to have will be speedily relieved and ulti- 
mately cured. Of dealers, 50c. and $1. By mail, prepaid. 

Sergeant's Carbolic Soft Soap 

is the "best ever" and for sale everywhere. 25c. of 
dealers. By mail 35c. 

An order, or 3c. in stamps will entitle you to our 
latest Dog Book and Pedigree blank, mailed free. 
For sale by "All Druggists & Sporting Goods Dealers." 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO., Richmond, Va. Dept. L. 




mm^mmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmmm^i 



WHEN YOU REALIZE 

that we own our own open-hearth steel furnaces, make 
our own Steel, then the Billets, then the Rods, then 
the Wire, and then Galvanize it in our own pans ; 

THEN YOU CAN PLAINLY SEE 

how we can furnish so much better fencing at about 
the same price that you have to pay for other kinds. 

If we could use common wire in PAGE FENCES, we 
could save about $5.00 a ton just on the wire. 
All styles of PAGE FENCES are made of PAGE-WIRE. 
Our catalog reads like a story. It is free. 



Page IVoven IVire Fence Co. 



BOX 39, 



ADRIAN, MICHIGAN 



xlii 



RECREATION. 




With a 



Kenwood Sleeping Bag 

you do not need a tent; you are pre- 
pared for any weather, hot or cold, 
wet or dry. It is a light, compact, 
warm covering that assures comfort 
every night. The construction is 
simple, sanitary and practical. Hun- 
dreds of experienced sportsmen are 
now using Kenwood Bags. 

Write us for prices, samples and 
full information. 



THE KENWOOD MILLS 

DEPARTMENT B, ALBANY, N. Y. 



/ro^^y//.,,.^/- 



COMPACT ! 



POWERFUL ! 



COOKS ANYWHERE. 

The Khotal Camp Stove. 




Burns Kerosene *x°«Krw^| 

Hot meals and solid comfort. Heat regulated by self- 
cleaning needle valve, from a gentle simmering warmth to 
a temperature of 2,000° Fahrenheit. Send for Catalogue. 
Mention Recreation. 
Price, $3.75. 

The HYDRO-CARBON BURNER CO. 

197 Fulton St., New York. 



Fins and Feathers 

are plentiful along the line of the 



FRISCO 

SYSTEM 



St. Louis and San Francisco R.R. Go. 

Kansas City, Memphis and Birmingham R. R. 
SHOR.T LINE TO 

MISSOURI, KANSAS, ARKANSAS, 
INDIAN AND OKLAHOMA TERRITORIES 

Texas and Mexico 

VIA ST. LOUIS, KANSAS CITY, MO., 
OR MEMPHIS 

Write for illustrated literature of interest to real 
sportsmen. 

Vestibuled Pullman Buffet Sleeper, through with- 
out change between New York and Memphis, Tenn., 
via Washington, D. C, Atlanta, Ga., and Birming- 
ham, Ala., in connection with Pennsylvania R. R. 
and Southern Ry. 



F. D. RUSSELL 
General Eastern Agent 
385 B'way, New York 



A. HILTON 

General Passenger Agent 

St. Louis, Mo. 



RECREATION. 



Xllll 







THE 

WORLDS 

STANDARD 




They're made to measure 

Putman Boots 

fc... *-*•■'! 

Go on like a glove**^ fit all over. 



For a Quarter of a Century Putman Boots have been the 
Standard among Western Hunters, Prospectors, Ranchmen and En- 
gineers (who demand the best) and we have learned through our per- 
sonal contact with them llOW to make a perfect boot. 

Putman Boots are in use in nearly every civilized country in the 
World. They are Genuine Hand Sewed, Water Proof, Made to Meas- 
ure, Delivery charges prepaid, and cost no more thanothertS. Send for 
Catalogue of over 30 different styles of boots. Also Indian 
Tanned Moosehide Moccasins* 



Illustration shows No. 900, 14 inches high, Bellows Tongue, Made on any style 
toe desired, Uppers are Special Chrome Tanned Call Skin, tanned with the grain of 
the hide left on; (Our Special Tannage) making the leather water proof, black or 
brown color, large eyelets and wide leather laces, laced at side to fit boot tight around 
top, sole, light, medium or heavy. The soles are Genuine Hand Sewed, (making them 
soft and easy) and made of the best Water Proof Oak Sole Leather. 

Made to measure and delivered in the U. S., Canada 
Mexico for 



or 



$7.50 



H. J. PUTMAN & GO. 




36 HENNEPIN AVE. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



Send for Order Blank 

showing 

how to measure your Foot. 



CONLEY'S COMBINATION HDNTING COAT AND YEST. 



The Host Useful 
Coat to Sportsmen 





It is made of the 
best 8-oz. plain and 
rubberized duck of 
dead grass color, and 
is absolutely water- 
proof. 

Order direct from the 
factory. The hunter 
is our only agent 

Riterizeil, - $5.00 
Mterizei - 4,50 

You can use it for a 
long rain coat, a duck 
blind or sleeping bag. 
You can save yourself 
from dampness and 
cold, which costs 
money in the end. It 
will last a lifetime. 

Enclose stamp for 
booklet. 
Mention Recreation. —. 



Joseph, IVZo* 



xliv 



RECREATION. 



A Boarding-House 

2,798 Years Old 



is the " motif " of the story of " The 
Prophet's Chamber" in The Four- 
Track News for May. 

This little story will prove intensely 
interesting to every farmer, and par- 
ticularly to every farmer's wife, in 
New York and New England. 

The Four-Track News will be 
mailed free to any address in the 
United States on receipt of 5 cents in 
stamps, or it will be mailed for a year 
for 50 cents, by George H. Daniels, 
General Passenger Agent, Grand 
Central Station, New York. 



Private Country Board 



Of the best, perfect 
Summer conditions, 
edge charming New 
England mountain town, in the heart of the Berkshires. 
Adjoining Lenox, convenient to everywhere. Inland 
elevation 1200 feet above sea. Fine dry air not excelled 
by Adirondacks, yet within 4 hours of New York City 
by frequent expresses. (Adults only.) 
For particulars write early to 

RAMSAY MacNAUQHTAN, Pittsfleld, Mass. 



The 

WEST SHORE 
RAILROAD 

One of the leading Trunk Lines of America* 

Runs along the west side of the historic Hudson 
River* 

Through the foothills of the Catskill Mountains. 

Through the beautiful Mohawk Valley. 

Crossing the Genesee River at Rochester. 

Reaching Buffalo. Niagara Falls and Suspen- 
sion Bridge. 

Connecting at Buffalo for Chicago and the West* 

Having also connections for Cincinnati and St» 
L ouis^ _ 

Present fares from New York by the West Shore 

are as follows : 

$8.00 to Buffalo or Niagara Falls ; S18.00 
to Chicago; $14.00 to Detroit ; $12.00 to 
Cleveland; $21.25 to St. Louis; $15.00 to 
Cincinnati. 
For particulars call on any West Shore T.'cket Agent, 

or address 

C. E. LAMBERT. H. B. JAGOE. 

General Passenger Agent. Gen'l Eastern Passenger Agt. 

7 East 426. St., New York 359 Broadway, New York. 

I have a small game preserve now 
stocked with elk and Virginia deer. Should 
be glad to learn through Recreation where 
I can buy a pair each of antelope, mule 
deer and fallow deer. Last summer I 
raised a brood of native quails. They be- 
came as tame as chickens. I purpose to try 
raising California quails this year. 

F. J. Wilson, Lewisburg, O. 



50c. per 1000 

With a WAGER SCALE you can make 1000 perfect negatives, and you can't do it otherwise- 
Post free, 50 cents. Aluminum, $1.00. Endorsed by the Editor of Recreation. Your 
money back if you don't like it. Send a postal for descriptive circular. 

WAGER EXPOSURE SCALE CO., Box 539, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Mme. Benoit's 
Russian Depilatory 

Instantaneously Removes 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

without torturing, blistering, discoloring or leaving 
any blotch, signs or other ill effect on the skin. It is an 
effective, instantaneous, harmless remedy. 

Send for Booklet Giving Full Information* 

MME, BENOIT, 2 East 42d Street, New York City. 

Mention Recreation. 




M4RBED BEAUTY 



RECREATION. 



xlv 




1 



■r 



NORTHERN S.S. Go's Ships 



ORTH WEST 

AND 

LAND 



^dii> uere iMtirs 




QUICK SERVICE BETWEEN 
BUFFALO and CHICAGO 

MOST DELIGHTFUL OF ALL TRIPS 

Nearly half a million dollars has just been expended 
on these floating palaces, in adding new and novel im- 
provements, refurnishing, etc. 

Unapproached for rest, recreation and comfort. 



Leave Buffalo Tuesday and Saturday. 
Leave Chicago Wednesday and Saturday. 



For full information apply to 

W. M. LOWRIE, General Passenger Agent 

1460 Prudential Bldg., Buffalo, N. Y. 



xlvi 



RECREATION. 




♦Maine 

1 Railroad 




illustrated descriptive pamphlet (containing complete maps) have ■ 
been issued under the following titles, and will be mailed 
upon receipt of 2 CENTS in stamps for each book. 

ALL ALONGSHORE, LAKE SUNAPEE, 
AMONG THE MOUNTAINS, SOUTHEAST NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
LAKES AND STREAMS, SOUTHWEST NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
FISHING AND HUNTING, CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS, 
MERRIMACK VALLEY, LAKE MEMPHREMACOG, 

THE MONADNOCK REGION, 
VALLEY °L™ CONNECTICUT ™2 NORTHERN VERMONT, 
THE HOOSAC COUN TRY*™ DE ERFIELD VALLEY. 

COLORED BIRDS EYE VIEW FROM MT. WASHINGTON 
SENT ON RECEIPT QF 6 CTS. IN STAMPS. 

&#fso Summer IffUr/stBoofTjimy list of tours and rates, fate/ 
and boarding house list, and other va/uah/e information, free. 

For all Publications Apply To 
Passenger Department, b.&m.r.r. boston, Mass. 

//. * J. Ft 3 tide PS , gen'l pass'r & ticket agent. 



DOGS BARRED, IN ALLEGANY COUNTY. 

The following act was passed by the Supervis- 
ors, and will prevent all hunting with dogs in Al- 
legany county for 3 years: 

Sec. 1. No person shall hunt or kill with a 
dog or dogs any woodcock, snipe, quail or ruffled 
grouse, commonly called partridge, within the 
county of Allegany, New York, for 3 years from 
January 1, 1902. 

Sec. 2. Any person violating the provisions of 
the foregoing section shall be guilty of a misde- 
meanor, and on conviction shall be punished by a 
fine of $20 for each offense, one-half to be paid 
to the person entering the complaint and one-half 
to the county treasurer. In default of payment 
of said fine, said offender shall be imprisoned in 
the county jail of said county 20 days. — Wells- 
ville (N. Y.) Reporter. 

So we must poach or hang up our guns 
for 3 years. This august body favors a 
law extending the open season on black 
and Oswego bass in Lake Cuba, and at the 
same time wants to double the tax on dogs. 
Out of our 29 supervisors I venture the 
assertion not more than 3 ever bagged a 
bird. They are, therefore, probably fitted 
to make laws governing sportsmen's 
methods. Our board is credited with 
a member who sought to have a law 
enacted compelling owners of bees to stamp 
their names on each bee, to enable owners 
of clover fields to maintain actions for tres- 
pass by honey seekers. 

What next? 

H. C. Wilcox, Friendship, N. Y. 



IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO NA- 
TURE, READ RECREATION. 



£0 " tfte" Pleasure Resorts of 



♦♦♦ 



Un% ana Gulf of mexico 



TAKE 



w i 




Via CHICAGO, KANSAS CITY, or 
ST. LOUIS 

WAGNER BUFTET SLEEPERS 

FREE "KATY" CHAIR CARS 

For further information, address 

W. S. ST. GEORGE, Gen. East. Agt. 
308 Broadway, New York 



RECREATION. 



xl \ ii 



Fabled Tcmagaming 




THIS most beautiful Ontario 
lake is in the heart of the 
Ojibway country, and 
much Indian folklore clusters 
about it; but it has other attrac- 
tions for the sportsman and 
fisherman, for here moose, cari- 
bou, bear and deer are found 
almost, if not quite, as abundant- 
ly as when the first coureur 
des bois found his way there. 

Of course big game may only 
be shot during the latter half of 
October and November, so the 
summer visitor must content 
himself (or herself, for many 
ladies go there each year) with 
black bass, heavy lake trout, 
northern pike and the gilded 
pike-perch. Most men find it 
easy to be satisfied with such 
after season by the shores to 



sporting fare, and not a few pitch their tents season 
Temagaming and its sister waters. 

For further particulars, apply 
to any officer or agent of the 

Canadian 

Pacific 

Railway 

or to 353 Broadway, New York, 
N. Y.; 629-631 Chestnut Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. ; 129 East Balti- 
more Street, Baltimore, Md. ; 
1229 Pennsylvania Avenue, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; 304 Washington 
Street, Boston, Mass. ; 235 Main 
Street, Buffalo, N. Y. ; 7 Fort 
Street, W., Detroit, Mich.; 228 
South Clark Street, Chicago, 111. 



KVt>fclK! KERR, Passenger Traffic Manager 

MONTREAL 




xlviii 



RECREATION. 



F» O O O IN O 

Mountains 




Lackawanna 
Railroad 






A region of ? woodland and water, 2000 feet above sea level" in" 

northeastern Pennsylvania ; one of the most alluring resorts fci/ 

health and 'pleasure to be found in the east ; L dry, cool and 

invigorating ;\ splendid 'roads ; modern hotels.^ 'Reached in! 

Zy 2 hours from Nev^York-^by fast ^express trains over the Lackawanna 1 

Railroad. ^ _ , _^ 

" Mountain^and^Lake Resorts, "Ta handsomely illustrated book) 
containing a series of/ sketches, called ." The Experiences of Pa," will 
give complete information. s Sent on receipt of 5 cents in postage] 
stamps, addressed to T. W. Lee, • General^ Passenger Agent, Lacka^ ; 
wanna Railroad, New York City. . " : . 



RECREATION. 



xlix 



A BOOK 

FOR 

Sportsmen atid Vacationists, 



ISSUED BY THE 



Bangor e£ Aroostook R. R. 



AND ENTITLED 



ii 




Fl 



Is a Guide to the Fishing, Hunting 
and Camping Regions of 

NORTHERN MAINE. 



175 pages; Illustrated bf over 100 half- 
tone cuts of scenery, fish and garden 
Handsomely designed. 
SENT FOR 10c. IN STAMPS. 



Address : 

GEO. n. HOUGHTON, Traffic flgr, 
BANGOR, ME. 

Mention Recreation. , 



Do you want a Good, Reliable 
Substantial, Well Made 

Single Barrel Shot Hi 

If so, send me 

!0 YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

and I will send you such a 
Gun as a premium 

It is made by the DA VENPORT ARMS 
CO., and this means it is made of good 
material and that only good workmanhip 
is put on it. 

This is one of the many remarkable op- 
portunities RECREATION is offering to 
men and boys to fit themselves out com- 
pletely for shooting and fishing. 



Sample Copies for Use in Canvassing 
Furnished on Application. 



Address 



RECREATION 

23 W. 24th Sfc, New York Gty 



TVR£N2 



THE HOST CHARMING 



PIER 
RESORTS 

IN AMEKICA 

IOOO FEET ABOVE SEA LFV*U 




• ***** 

HIGHLAND 
of ONTARIO 



MUSKOKA LAKES DISTRICT 
LAKE OF BAYS REGION 
riAGNETAWAN RIVER < GEORGIAN BAY 

KAWARTHA LAKES 
LAKES SIMCOE^COUCHICHING 

EASY OF ACCESS ~ 

mrruNiTY from hay fever 

NEW rlODERN HOTELS 

FRrr ILLUSTRATED 
I IVLL PUBLICATIONS 

CANBE/fAtimOM CfiAND mUNK AAfLWAY $yST£ff 



Boston, Mass., . - 
Buffalo, N.Y., . . 
Chicago, III., . . 
Detroit, Mich.. . 
Grand Rapids, Mich 
Hamilton, Ont., . 
Kingston, Ont./ . 
Los Angeles, Cal., 
Montreal, Que., . 
New York, N. Y., . 
San Francisco, Cal., 
St. Paul, Minn., . 
Toronto, Ont., 



T. Wynne, 306 Washington Street. 

J. D. McDonald. 285 Main St. (Ellicott Square Bldg ). 
[. H. Burgis, 249 Clark St., Cor. Jackson Boulevard. 

Geo. W. Watson 124 Woodward Avenue. 

C. A Justin, Morton House Block. 

C. E. Morgan, .... 11 James Street, North. 
J. P. Hanley, ; Corner Ontario and Johnston streets. 
W. H. Bullen, -4 : . . . California Bank Building. 

J. Quinlan, Bonaventure Station. 

F. P. Dwyer, n . . Dun Building, 290 Broadway. 

W. O. Johnson, 1 219 Front Street. 

David Brown, Jr., .... Ill Endicott Arcade. 
M. C. Dickson, Union Station. 



o*™ C T B ELJL 

6£~*r£f?A.£. -'J>ASS£*r<&£J9 AA/O TtCK£T AC£*T 

MONTR£AL,CANADA. 



RECREATION. 



i 



A King Folding Canvas Boat 

IS -MADE TO GIVE 

VCADC HE HADH ^FDVIfF is built entirely by HAND LABOR. Care- 
ICAK^ vlr n/\KlL/ JCKVIWC, fully framed and modeled BY HAND NOT BY 

MACHINERY. Its indestructible steel frame is made to stand salt water by heavy galvanizing. NO BAG- 
GING between the ribs is possible owing to the automatic tension of the Spring Steel Frame of 12 longitudinal 
and 1 3 diagonal ribs. This ribbing is covered by U. S. patents. Makes the 

SMALLEST and NEATEST PACKAGE of any FOLDING BOAT 

With Air Chambers in 
They Float 

100 pounds 

Bottom Boards 




Rest on 


the 


Frame 
Not on 


the 


Canvas 





ll=foot Special 

King Folding Canvas Boat Co., 



They are Stiffer than a Wooden Boat 
because the lines are fuller, and are much 
easier to row or paddle. 

Send 6c. for Catalogue No. 7— 60 illus- 
trations and 250 testimonials. 

Kalamazoo, flich., U. S. A. 




ACME FOLDING BOAT CO., MIAMISBClifc}. O. 



Send for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States, 
Canada and England. Just filled an order for 
Received medal and award at Chicago World'& 

Mention Recreation. 



U. S. Government who prefer our boats. 

Fair. If you investigate we will get your order. 

Acme Folding Boact Company, Mi©Lmisb\irg f O. 




VISIBLESPARK 



SLOWEDTOlMtPER-HR? 



FROCH ESTERS 
GAS ENGINE Co: 



ROCHESTER N.Y 



Luxurious 
Launches 

Fay & Bowen 
Launches are the 
very finest in con- 
struction and fin- 
ish; equipped with 
the famous Fay & 
Bowen Motors, which start when started, 

and run until you stop them. No crank or handle. 

A perfect and unique Igniter. Motors from i% to 

25 H. P. Send for catalogue. 

Fay & Bowen, 28 Mill St., Auburn, N. V. 



For Sale or Exchange : One thorough- 
bred liver and white pointer, one year 
old, broken ready for work, staunch, and 
works close, $25. One black and white 
English setter, 8 months old, ready for 
breaking, makes good points now, $10. 
Three thoroughbred pointer pups, 6 weeks 
old, from best strains in the State, $10. 
One B-flat Slide Trombone, "Conn," triple 
' silver-plated, 6# inches bell, gold lined, 
good as new, cost $5*2.50. will take $35. 
F. C. Read, Cold Brook, N. Y. 

Sent Free: Ten varieties of Mexican post- 
age and revenue stamps for one annual 
subscription to Recreation sent in through 
me. Stamp collectors should not miss this 
chance to increase their collection of Mexi. 
can stamps. Albert M. Penn, Laredo, Tex. 



RECREATION. 



li 





A PLEASURE CRAFT. 



In the use of which, you are tranquil in Mind, Body and 
Estate. It is Safe to use, Sure to go, Economical to 
maintain* It's the kind that's 

"ALL RIGHT. ALL THE TIME." 

Built upon lines of Grace and Beauty, with Strength, Power and 
Speed. Send 10 cents for Launch and Marine Engine Catalog "L 
WESTERN GAS ENGINE CO., Mishawaka, Ind. 



Mullins' Galvanized Sheet Steel Boats 



AND INDIAN CANOES 



Low 

in 
Price 




Send for Complete Illustrated Catalogues 



W. H. MULLINS, 



228 Depot Street, SALEM, OHIO 



Every Sportsman 

Every Prospector 

Every Surveyor 

Every Timber Huntei 

Every Explorer 

Who goes into the woods or the mountains 
should carry one of 

Marble's Pocket Axes 

This is the most convenient and useful tool evei 

invented for such men. 
It is as important as a hunting knife, and almosl 

as much so as a match box. This Ax is 

neat, light, safe and effective. 

You can do more things with it than with any 

other one instrument known to the craft. 
I have made an arrangement with 

W. L. Marble, Gladstone, Mich. 

The Maker of this Ax 

which enables me to offer, for a short time, one 
of these axes as 

A Premium for Three Subscriptions 



to RECREATION. 
This is Another Great Opportunity 

and should be taken advantage of at once by 
every woodsman who is not already supplied 
with one of these handy tools. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in can- 
vassing furnished on application. 



I Rushton Canoes | 

I "The Quintessence of Canoe Quality" I 

"INDIAN" f^| MODEL | 




Grade A, $38 to $40. Grade B, $30 to $32. 

Length, 15 ft.; beam, 32 in. ; depth at center, 12 in. Oak, 
cedar and cherry frame, canvas cover. 
Weight, 56 to 66 lbs. " 

Some canoes are quite strong, but slow ; 
others are quite fast, but fragile ; but in the 

RUSHTON CANOE 

you will find strength and speed combined. 
I make my canoes out of air-seasoned Mich- 
igan white cedar, and I also make a specialty 
of canvas covered cedar canoes. Better see 
my models before you decide to buy. 

My Illustrated 80-page catalogue is sent free 
on request. 

J. H. RUSHTON, 817 Water St., Canton, N.Y.,U.S.A. 



Ill 



RECREATION. 



Small Profits — Quick Sales. 



TROUT 
FLIES 

for trial — send us 




15c^ g a u n la a f p ° r S% s 4 a S. e s te ' Quality A Flies 
30c ^, a Tp°HS!sSs doz - Quality B Flies 

60c ^ g a u n la a ; p ° r s d i 4 Te p n, e s doz - Quality C Flies 

Z fir* for an assorted dozen, T>«ee CI IPC 
OVfC Regular price 84 cents. DdW TllCd 



maaaan 



SPLIT BAMBOO RODS 



Ply Rods 

10 feet, 6 ounces 



TO cts. 



3a.it; Rods 

9 feet, 8 ounces 

3 piece and extra tip, cork grip, in wood form 



Try our new Braided Silk Enameled Waterproof 
METAL CENTER LINE 

Size No. 5, 4% cents per yard. Size No. 4, 5% cents per 
yard. Put up in 10- yard lengths connected. 



$200 Tvttle Launches Are the Winners 

15 MILES IN TWO HOURS. LAUNCH ON EXHIBITION IN STORE 

Catalogues of any of above goods free on application 

The H. H. KIFFE CO., 523 Broadway, New York City 

Mention Recreation. 



SILVER LAKE TROUT FARM 

Brook Trovit 

FOR STOCKING PURPOSES 

Correspondence Solicited 

GEO. F. LANE, Silver LaJke, 

Plymouth County, Mass. 



FISHING -—Black Bass and Salmon 

Illustrated Guide with Maps of the 

RIDEAU, BEVERLEY & CHARLESTON LAKES, frte 

Apply to'E. A. GEIGER, Sup't 
Brockville,Westport & S. Ste. M. Ry., Brockville, Ont. 

IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO NA- 
TURE, READ RECREATION. 



GOOD CHANCE TO JOIN ONE OF THE BEST 
FISHING AND HUNTING CLUBS IN CANADA 

One share in the North Lake Fish and Game Club for sale. 
This club is situated within easy access ot Montreal. Fine 
Trout Fishing, Deer Hunting, Beautiful Scenery. Club con- 
trols 200 square miles ot good Moose Hunting Territory. 
Will sell lor $100. Address, "B," care of Recreation. 

For Exchange : One No. 5 D Al-Vista 
panoramic camera, valued at $50, for a Vic- 
tor gramaphone using rubber disks, or a 
good Remington or Smith Premier No. 2 
typewriter. Address G. H. E., care of 
Recreation. 

For Sale: Winchester 12 gauge '97 model. 
Take-down shot gun, 30 inch barrel, Barger 
sight; new, perfect condition, for $14 50- 
List price $27. J. W. Fream, Harney, Md. 




Submerged Electric Motor Co. 

GENERAL OFFICE WORKS, MENOIIONIE, WISCONSIN 

PORTABLE FRESH AND SALT 
WATER PROPELLERS 

Attached to a double-ender or any boat in a moment. 

Absolutely practical ; Noiseless, Odorless and Sate. 

Nothing to get out of order or explode. Runs in shal- 
g. low water and is the correct thing for Hunting and 
1 Fishing. Nothing so desirable for boating. We make 

the best Motor Generators and Gasoline Generators 

for any purpose. 

Outfit of Boat— 16 ft— and Fresh Water Motor 
for Lake, with 2-box Battery, $195.00. 

Send for full information and catalogue. 

Gen'l Sales Office, R. 329 Hennepin Ave. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



RECREATION. 



liii 





Established 1840 

Geo. B. Carpenter & Co. 



Fishing 
Jetinc 



MAKERS OF HIGH GRADE 



TENTS, SAILS, CMP FOBHITBBE 



Folding Cots 

Tables and Chairs 00- A 



Oars, Paddles, 
Marine Hardware 



»©=«^-<r 




<;eo.B. carpentered), 



The Largest and Most Complete Stock in the U.S. 

Send 4C in stamps for Tent and Camp Catalogue, or 
6c. in stamps for Marine Hardware Catalogue. 

200,202, 204, 206, 208S. Water St., Chicago, 111 



^^^!tf4Jfe^U^UAitt^iii Wii/jf/A^ii Uiiij t C^TT^V^^V^^ A 




77 Information 
Bureaus of the 
New York Central Lines 



Each city ticket office of the New 
York Central, Boston & Albany, Mich- 
igan Central, Lake Shore, Big Four, 
Pittsburg & Lake Erie, and Lake Erie 
& Western Railroads in the cities of 
New York, Brooklyn, Boston, Worces- 
ter, Springfield, Albany, Utica, Mon- 
treal, Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, 
Niagara Falls, Detroit, Cleveland, 
Columbus, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, 
Louisville, St. Louis, Chicago, Denver, 
San Francisco, Portland, Los Angeles, 
and Dallas, Texas, is an information 
bureau where desired information 
regarding rates, time of trains, char- 
acter of resorts, hotel accommoda- 
tions, and a thousand and one other 
things the intending traveler wants 
to know will be freely given to all 
callers. 

For a copy of Four Track Series No. 3, "America's 
Summer Resorts," send a 2 cent stamp to George H. 
Daniels, General Passenger Aeent, Grand Central 
Station, New York; or send 5 cents for a copy o* the 
Four Track News, a beautifully illustrated magazine 
of travel and education. 



Fisk's Aerating! 
Minnow Pail 



JtSr" The only 
Minnow Pail 
in which Min- 
nows can be 
kept alive in- 
definitely. 

Has an air 
chamber at 
the bottom 
holding26ocu- 
bic inches of 
condensed air 
forced in by 
the Air Pump 
attached, and 
by a simple 
rubber attach- 
ment the air is 
allowed to es- 
cape into the 
water gradu- 
ally, supply- 
ing the fish 
with the oxygen consumed by them. One pumping 
is sufficient for ten hours. 

Height, i foot; diameter, io inches; weight, 7^ 
lbs.; water, 2% gallons; keeps 5c to 150 minnows, ac- 
cording to their size. 

IT KEEPS THEM ALIVE. 

Price, $5 net— Sold direct 

Send for Circular. Mention Recreation. 

J. M. KENYON (El CO. 

Toledo. Ohio. U. S. A. 




Jiv 



RECREATION. 



esLsz.- '-'I 



"The Automatic Reel did it." 

Caught by H. H. Fraser, St. Johns, N. F. 

No slack line— ^ed, s t£ 

little finger instantly releases spring which 
winds the ^line automatically. This con- 
tinual pull ^B^ prevents fish from dislodg- 
ing hook from ^®^, _ his mouth. When 
once hooked, he's 
your fish. Reel can 
be made free-running 
for casting. 



rizes 



For particulars ask .83^ 
any sporting goods " Little 
dealer, or send di- finger 
rect, for "Booklet X. » d °j^ »y 
Yawman «$ Erbe Mfg. Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



No other reel will give satisfaction 
after you have seen 




The Cebrated 



ATHOMPSON- 
QUIMBY 

Hunting 



have 
on file 
measure- 
ments of 
all old cus- 
tomers who 
have bought 
the celebrated 
Thompson Hunt- 
ing Boots and 
Shoes of the W. 
Fred Quimby Co. 
of New York for 
the past 20 years, 
and am prepared 
to make the same 
grade of sports- 
men's footwear 
as in the past. I 
was formerly superintendent 
of the shoe department of that 
firm and have bought out the 
right to make these boots and shoes 
Measurement blanks and prices on 
application. Mention Recreation 

T. H. Guthre 

33 William Street, NEWARK, 



Shoes and 
Mocca- 




Guaran- 




•THE TALBOT "REEL 

A thing more perfect was never wrought in metal. In 
Tournaments always a victor ; among the Fishermen's 
treasures, the chief. Send for Booklet "D." 

W. H. TALBOT, Nevada. Mo. 



Shakespeare Baits 

Make Big Black Bass Strike. 

The Shakespeare Revolution Bait is almost marvelous in its success in making the big, lazy 
black bass— the biggest in the lake— strike wben even tbe plumpest, liveliest minnows or frogs will 
not tempt him. In the water it struggles as if alive and attracts a bass or any game fish from m any J 
yards away For large or small mouth bass or pickerelit has no equal and no particular skill is re- I 
QJgM^raCMAO^M* [ f*%*% i** quired to use it. A small boy with a ball of twine, an old boat and" 
WsT»5sTfmCoJlW»»«« ■? m l(r€*#«9 a revolution bait caught 19 bass in three hours that weighed 43 lbs. 

Make you Sure of Landing Your Big Catch. There is no reel like it for bait-casting, it 

makes a rapid, successful, expert fisherman out of the amateur or beginner in a very short time. These reels are 
so beautiful in design, so exquisitely finished and withal so serviceable and strong the angler who is so fortunate 
as to own one treasures it as his dearestand most valued possession and the price is within reach of every angler. 
•500 in Cash and Diamond prizes for best bait-casting records each month this season also 8100 additional f orbiggest 
bass. You can win at home. No entry fee required. Write for particulars. Shakespeare 
Reelt and, BstU sent free on trial to any anplnr who sends name and address to 

WM. SHAKESPEARE, JR., 237 Shakespeare Building, KALAMAZOO, MICH. 

AOTK — lik for the charming little books "How to Catch Bass," "The Fine Points of 

a Reel" and "The Art of Bait-casting. THBY ARE FREE to every sportsman. 



M& 



RECREATION. 



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bra 



,:'.! 



v'£ 



<3M# 









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GEE WfflZ! 

I never could have landed him 
with a willow pole, or with 
any other kind but A BRISTOL. 

If you want a rod that will bring 
the big ones out, you must get 

A BRISTOL. 

I have seen fellows try all the other kinds, 
but some break, some come unwound, some 
bend too easy and some not easy enough. 
The fellows that use the Bristols, get 
every fish that bites. 

Made by the 

HORTON MFG. CO., Bristol, Conn. 






Send for new catalogue. 
Mention Recreation. 



>&>.%: 



MM :»si t-' *** '-"* 












hi 



RECREATION. 



"HOPKINS & ALLEN" 

New Line Small Calibre Rifles 




No. 822. — Lever Action, case hardened, walnut stock, rubber butt plate, weight 

4 pounds, 20-inch barrel, for 22 R. F. long or short cartridges. $4.50 




No. 722. — Solid Breech Block Action, case hardened; walnut stock, rubber butt plate, 

weight 3^ pounds, 18 inch barrel, for 22 short R. F. cartridges, $3.50 

We will ship, all charges prepaid, on receipt of remittance with order, to any 
express office in the U. S. A. We agree to refund your money if you are not 
satisfied, provided you will agree to mail us a target made with the rifle we 
send you. Order while this offer is open. 

The Hopkins & Allen Arms Co. 

NORWICH, CONN., U. S. A. 



RECREATION. 



lvii 



Newhouse Traps 




THE STANDARD FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 

Used by all professional hunters and trappers, 
who find that 

The Best Trap is the Cheapest 

Complete illustrated catalogue on 
application. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, LTD., Kenwood, N. Y. 



Practical Common Sense 
in 6 Sizes. 



CAMP 
STOVE 

Either with or 
without oven. The 
lightest, strongest 
most compact, prac- 
tical stcve made. 
Cast combination 
sheet sleel top, 
smooth outside, 
heavy lining in fire 
box and around oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe 
carried inside the stove. Burns larger wood and keeps 
fire longer than any other. Used by over 9,000 campers 
and only one stove returned . 

For catalogue giving lull particulars, mention Rec- 
reation and address, 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 




Jf or Sale: 30-30 Winchester Carbine, in 
good condition, with reloading tools ; $9. 
Oscar Himebough Suffield O. 

FREE-HOW DOES THIS STRIKE YOU? 

To everyone sendingme $1 by Draft or P.O. Money Or- 
der, for a year's subscription to Recreation, I will give the 
choice of one of FOUR Roosevelt hunting books, Sagamore 
Series, post-paid, each containing frontispiece, 16° cloth, 
substantial and large print. The books are: '"Hunting the 
Grizzly," * 'Hunting Trips of a Ranchman," 'Wilderness 
Hunter" and '"Hunting Trips on the Prairie." This is a 
generous offer and will not be open long. By this offer jou 
can enlarge your library of sporting books with practically 
no expense to you. The books are interesting, instiuctive, 
considered by many President Roosevelt's best books. 
Address GEO. J. BICKNELL, Hamboldt, Iowa. 

For Sale: A Lefever Hammerless D 
grade, old style action, 10 gauge 30-inch 
Damascus, drop 3. length 14. weight 10 lbs. 
Left barrel full, right modified choke. In 
good condition. Makes a very close target. 
Reloading tools and brass shells with it. 
Price, $35.00. I. P. Tafft, Box 474, Nor- 
wich, Conn. 

Wanted: Typewriter in perfect condition 
in exchange for Winchester, 38-70, model 73, 
made to order with complete outfit, cost 
$23.00, in fine condition; also, splendid, 
mounted specimen of wood ibis; Florida 
Views, (Photos) or native plants, shells, etc. 
C. E. Pleas, Chipley, Fla. 




Tennis Rackets 
and Golf Clubs 



ARE 



Carefully Selected Perfectly Balanced 
Finely Finished Up-to-Date in Model 



A 'Trial will .Convince 
Tou of These Qualities 

Complete Lines of TENNIS and GOLF Supplies 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 

THE BRIDGEPORT GUN 
IMPLEMENT COMPANY 

313 — 3 17 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



Sportsmen ! Smokers ! 

"PR.ESS-ME" 

A Toba.cco Pouch 

GOOD THING 

Self-feeding No Trouble 

Self-closing No Waste 

Made of fine, soft leather, in Russet, 

Brown and Black, price, 25c. 

Black Kangaroo, 50c. ; Seal, 75c. 

From your Tobacconist or Direct 

The PEERLESS POUCH CO., Inc. 
Box 284 (R), Washington, D.C. 




PATENTED 



Our camping club is on the lookout for 
a site for our next fall's camp. Can you 
put us in communication with some reliable 
people in Pennsylvania, who are located 
in regions where bear, deer and small game 
may be had? 

Recreation Camping Club, 
Camp Hill, Pa. 



IN ANSWERING ADS 
MENTION RECREATION. 



PLEASE 



THE PERFECTED MALCOLM" TELESCOPIC SIGHT 



1857-1Q02 

NEW COMPANY 





OUR "ROUGH RIDER" HUNTING SCOPE, $9.00. 

The Best and Cheapest on the market. New Catalogue just out. 

Write 'Bhe Malcolm Rifle Telescope Mfg. Co., Syracuse, N. Y., U, S. A« 



Iviii 



RECREATION. 



IDEAL w PAPER SHOT SHELLTRIMMER 

SOMETHING NEW. 

With it you can cut off the soft and 
frayed ends of shells that have been 
fired and they will be as good as 
new. Why throw good shells 
away ? Send us 6 cents in stamps for 
latest IDEAL HAND BOOK, 
giving full information of all New 
Goods and much matter of interest 
to shooters. Address, 

IDEAL MANUF'G CO., New Haven, Conn.,1). S, A. 

The Phil. B. Bekeart Co., of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast 

When you write please Mention Recreation. 





1902 Model 

LEATHER -COVERED Pneu- 
matic Recoil Pad is now per- 
fect. No pump, no valve, no 
recoil, no flinch, no headache, 
no bruised shoulders, no 
money if not satisfactory and 
returned at once. P R I C E $2. 

J, R. WINTERS 
Clinton, Mo. 



Another Great Chance 

f I HAVE ON HAND 

A WILKESBARRE GUN 

($125 Grade, Entirely New) . 
FINE DAMASCUS BARRELS 

that I will gi\e to anyone who will send me 75 
yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 

I have only one of these guns, and so the first 
man who sends me the $75 will get it. Others 
who may try for the gun and be too late can get 
for their clubs a Syracuse, Ithaca, Parker or 
Remington gun, of as high grade as I can afford 
to furnish. 



POOLER'S BOSS SHOT, CARTRIDGE BELT 
AND GAME CARRIER 

The best of all. Delivered by mail to any 
address on receipt of $2. Send 10 cents 
in silver or stamps for Sample Cart- 
ridge Holder. 




R_. H. POOLER, Manufacturer 
SERENA, ILL. 



The New York Life Insurance Co., S. 
L. Fleming, agent, 276 West 43d street, 
New York. — If any reader of Recreation 
is thinking of taking out a policy, I can 
tell him something that will interest him. 

I wish to obtain a copy of Recreation, 
of December, 1894. Will pay any reason- 
able price for it. Please address, 

C. Greenwood, Lakeside, Wash. 

SOME GOOD GUIDES. " 
Following are names and addresses of guides 
who have been recommended to me, by men 
who have employed them ; together with date 
as to the species of game and fish which these 
guides undertake to find for sportsmen. 

If anyone who may employ one of these 
guides should find him incompetent or un- 
satisfactory, I will be grateful if he will report 
the fact to me. 

FLORIDA. 
Cason Bros-., Frostproof, bear, deer, turkeys, quail, 

snipe. 
C. H. Stokes, Mohawk, deer, alligators, turkey, quail 
and snipe. 

IDAHO. 
John Ching, Kilgore, elk, bear, deer, antelope, moun- 
tain sheep, trout and grouse. 
R. W. Rock, Lake, ditto 

Chas. Pettys, Kilgore, ditto 

MAINE. 
W. C. Holt, Hanover, moose, caribou, deer, grouse, 

and trout. 
H. R ; Horton, Flagstaff, bear,* moose, fox, grouse and 
trout. 

MONTANA. 
James Blair, Lakeview, elk, bear, deer, trout and 
grouse. 

A. T. Leeds, Darby, ditto 
Chas. Marble. Chestnut, ditto 
Wm. R. Waugh, Darby, moose, bear, elk, deer, sheep, 

grouse and trout; 

OREGON, 

W. H. Boren, Camas Valley, bear, deer, elk, grouse 
and trout. 

WYOMING. 

Frank L. Peterson, Jackson, elk, bear, deer, moun- 
tain sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 

S. N. Leek, Jackson, ditto 

James L. McLaughlin, Valley, elk, bear, deer, moun- 
tain sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 

Felix Alston, Irma, - ditto 

CANADA. 

W. A. Brewster, Banff, Rocky Mountain Park, 
Can.,, bear, sheep, goats, grouse and trout. 

Wm. S. Andrews, Lillooet, B. C, deer, bear, monu- 
tain sheep, goats, grouse and trout. 

B. Norrad, Boieztown, B. C, moose, caribou, 
grouse and trout. 



RECREATION. 



lix 



Charles Daly Field Gun 

No. 80 




Price, $80. 



Locks and Action Anson oi Deeley system — Charles Daly 
Pattern. This means that the frame is one inch longer than the regular 
Anson & Deeley frame, making the leverage greater. This with the 
"~~ fine fitting, accounts for Daly Guns seldom shaking loose. Experts 
consider the Anson & Deeley Locks the safest and best. They are the most expensive to make and are 
used by seve^ of the leading makers of high class guns. The lock parts are highly polished and finished 
better than most guns costing twice as much. Stocks of selected Italian Walnut; pistol grip and rubber 
butt plate. Fore End fitted with Deeley and Edge patent fore end snap. Barrels of Krupp's Genuine 
Fluid Steel. Barrels equal to or better than used in many guns costing 3 times as much. Bored on the 
same system that has made the Daly Gun renowned for its wonderful shooting qualities. Rib beautifully 
matted with large Doll's Head Extension, which with 2 bolts on the lug, gives it 3 distinct catches. 

Fitting, 'Balance, Shooting Qualities — Simply Perfect . 

ScKoverling, DaJy & GsJes 



302-304 Broskdwa-y. 



New York 



* 
* 









AT THE GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP OF 1902 

Du Pont Smokeless 

WON 

MORE MONEY 

Than all the OTHER POWDERS combined. 

The most popular powder on the grounds. 






* 
* 



E. I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 






lx RECREATION. 



^HIGHEST QUALITY RODS 
tm FINE FISHING TACKLE 



J 



CAMP OUTFITS. VACATION SUPPLIES. 

SPLIT BAMBOO, LANCE WOOD AND STEEL RODS, ALL VARIETIES. 

BEST Enameled Lines, both English and American make. Silk, Linen and 
Cotton Lines, the *• Dream " Patent Spinner for trolling, Baskets, Hooks, 
Rod Cases, Wading Stockings, etc., etc. Agents for «« Henry Milward & 
Sons," Redditch, England, and our Snell Hooks, Leaders, etc., are made especially 
for us by these noted manufacturers. Full supply for Early Lake Trolling of 
Milward's Angler Spinners, Dream Spinners, Milward's Phantom Minnows 
and Baits Of all kinds. Superior Quality only and of Highest Grade. Also 
Golf Goods, best makers. Agents for Anderson & Son's Celebrated Scotch Clubs 
with the Texa Shaft, insuring long drives. Vacation Outfits, Yacht Guns, Tents, 
Canoes, etc. 

ALSO FINE GUNS, ALL MAKERS. 

W. & C. Scott & Son, Lang, Westley Richards, Parker, Smith, Ithaca, Lefever, 
New Worcester, Davis, Remington, etc. 

^S** Send 6 .cts. in stamps for Fine Illustrated Catalogue of Fishing Tackle, 
Guns and List of Second Hand Guns, some of Highest Grade, Bargains. 

WM. READ & SONS, 107 Washington St., Boston. \ 

UTHE OLD GUN HOUSE. ESTABLISHED 1826. j 



H. ®. R. 

"Bicycle 
Hammerless" 
Revolver 



Description fllllllllllll 

32 Caliber, 5 shot. 2 Inch Barrel, Weight, 12 ounces. |I|§P!1ek||i 

C. F., S. & W. Cartridge. Finish, Nickel or Blue. WKLMLw 

IMPOSSIBLE TO CATCH on the pocket and discharge accidentally. 
ABSOLUTELY SAFE. Although designed for cyclists, this revolver 
is equally adapted to all cases where a small, light weight, effective 
and handy pocket weapon is desired. It has small frame and auto- 
matic ejector. Sold direct where dealers will not supply. 

HARRINGTON S RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

MaKers oi H. S R. SINGLE GVNS 
C^Io* for Postal WORCESTER. MASS. 



RECREATION. 



lxi 



The "OLD 
RELIABLE 

Hai Stood the test 
of Over 35 Years 



PARKER CUN 

Made on Honor. Has No Equal ! 

Is noted for its simplicity of construction 
beauty of proportion, excellence of work- 
manship, fauitlesB balance and HARD 1 
8 HOOTING QUALITIES 




Experience and ability have 
placed the Parker Gun in an envi- 
able and well deserved position as the 
Best Gun in the world. Made by the oldest 
shotgun manufacturers in America. Over 109,000 
of these guns in use. Send/or Catalogue 

PARKER BROS., MERIDEN, 

New York Salesroom, No. 32 Warren St. 




UNIVERSAL PALM REST 

Improves Your Score. 

"PERFECT TARGETS " 

IF YOU USE IT. 




This does it. 



Fits all guns. Adjustable to any position. Instantly attached or detached to 
trigger guard or finger lever without use of tools. Cannot deface or damage your 
gun. INSURES STEADY HOLDING. Send for circular. Mention "Recrea- 
tion." Price only $2.00 postpaid. Manufactured and for Sale by 

G REAT WESTERN GUN WORKS, PITTSBURG, P A. 

THE ORIGINAL MODERN RIFLE TELESCOPE. 



— #w*« 






"We announce that our perfected SNAPSHOT telescope, which is 
the innocent cause of the present "Revolution " in rifle telescopes, 
\?- 8t i 1 k un 5 1V m led as a hunting and offhand rifle sight, and that our 
High Grade Target Telescopes and Mountings bold the record for 
fcnest targets and the smallest [group on record at 200 yards 
A great variety of telescopes at from $10 00 upward 

DEALERS CAN CARRY THESE TELESCOPES IN STOCK Have 
always made them so. While other firms that boast of their antiquity were still advocating the 
unpractical long narrow kind, we were making SNAPSHOT telescopes v c fch shorter tube, low 
P°wer, largest field and practically universal focus, and sellin - them, too. 

The Evolution" of this telescope is the cause of the "Revolution " we low hear of. 

Send for our List and Sheet on mounting up the telescope, adjustments of the same, etc. 

JOHN W. SIDLE, 628 Race Street, Philadelphia, P<*. 
Mention Recreation. 



52. ~- 



P ST 



D 



THE 

AVENPORT 

HAMMERLESS 
GUN 




An Ideal 20TH CENTURY ARM, con- 
structed to meet the requirements 
of the 20th CENTURY SPORTS- 
MEN. SIMPLE in Action. 
STRONG, RELIABLE, 
SYMMETRICAL, 
ACCURATE, 
and SAFE. 




lxii 



RECREATION. 




■:■■•::. 

Mwm 

mm 

mm 

ml § 

JV.\'.V,V,V/- 

III 

iff! 

mmw)\ 



Vii/ufm 

mm 
mm Mi 






iiifS 



Sly 



N° 4 

$lQO LIST 

ITHACA 




Showing the DOUBLE THICK BREECH with 
NEW CROSS BOLT 

GUARANTEED to be worth $25.00 

more than any other make 

of Gun at Same Cost 

ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 






U. M. C. 

SMOKELESS .22 CARTRIDGES 



Will be used throughout the country during vacation 
days. They are the greatest luxury which has ever 
come to marksmen — no smoke — little noise — no fouling 
— exceeding accuracy. 

The .22 Short Smokeless has gained a reputation 
for itself and the C. B. Cap Smokeless, now for the 
first time put out, is well lubricated and has no glass 
to cut the bore of the gun. 



ffztv Catalogues 



The Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 



313 Broadway 
New York, N. Y 



Bridgeport 
Conn. 



86 First Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Remington N= 6 



HIFLE 




It needs "Only a Trial" to convince you that 

The New Model Remington No, 6 Take-down Single Shot Rifle 

is by far the best rifle you can buy for the money 

List price, $5.00, Apply to your dealer for catalog and discount 

Mention Recreation. 

REMINGTON ARMS CO. 

ILION, N. Y. 

425 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 313-317 Bro&dw&y, New York City 




CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS NEW YORK. 





REPEATING RIFLES FOR HUNTING 

No matter what your ideas or preferences are about a rifle, some one 
of the eight different Winchester models will surely suit y 
Winchester Rifles are made in all calibers, styles and weigh 
and whichever model you select, you can count on its being v 
made and finished, reliable in action and a strong, accurate shooter. 

FREE — Send your name and address on a postal card for our 164 page illustrated catalogue. 
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. - NEW HAVEN, CONN. 




"Break 
The 
"Bonds. 

Can you break 
away from cof- 
fee ? It proba- 
bly is the cause 
of your dyspepsia, 
weak heart, kidney 
trouble, sour stom- 
ach, an inactive brain 
and nervous prostra- 
tion. You can easily 
break the bands that hold 
you to coffee by using 
Postum Food Coffee, for it 
requires no effort to slip off 
coffee drinking for well-made 
Postum, and the change in 
health is miraculous in many 
cases. Postum is a food drink, 
rich in flavor, with none of the in- 
jurious effects of coffee. All grocers. 



£ 070D0NT 

New Size 25c. 




"Good for Bad Teeth 
Not Bad for Good Teeth." 

Into every bottle of 
SOZODONT has 
been poured the ex- 
perience and reputa- 
tion of fifty years 
in the making of 
high-grade toilet 
articles. We pledge 
ourselves of its per- 
fect purity, and sup- 
port the claim with 
analyses by chemists 
of the highest repute. 

Sold eYerywhere or by 
mail for the price, 25c. 
SOZODONT Tooth Pow- 
der, 25c. I*arge, liquid 
and Powder together, 75c 
Refuse substitutes. 

HALL & RUCKEI* 
New York 



Reduced from full ske 



vose 



PIANOS 



have been established over SO YEARS. Byoursys 

tem of payments every family in moderate cireum 
stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old in8tn!| 

ments in exchange and deliver the new piano in your home free of expensi 

Write for catalogue D and explanations. 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 160 Boylston St., Boston, Mass 



VOLUME XVII. 
NU/1BER 2 



AUGUST, 1902 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 



• * 




SPECIAL BIRD NUMBER 




Result of a single shot from a .303 SAVAGE Expanding Bullet. 

Keep Up with the Times. Do not buy a rifle until 

you have examined into the merits of the 

Savage 

— which is the Twentieth Century Arm. 

Only hammerless, repeating rifle in the world 

Absolutely Safe, Strongest Shooter, Flattest Trajectory, also neatest 
and most effective rifle manufactured. 

Highest Development of Sporting Rifles. 

Constructed to shoot Six Different Cartridges, or may be used as a 
single shot without the slightest change in the mechanism. 

Adapted for Large and Small Game. 

.303 and 30-30 calibers. Every rifle thoroughly guaranteed. 

Awarded Grand Gold Medal at Paris, in competition with all other styles of repeating rifles. 
Write for new illustrated catalogue ("G"). 

Manufacturers of SAVAGE Magazine and Magnetic Hammers* Send for Circular. 

Savage Arms Company 

Utica, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Pacific Coast Agents : BAKER & HAMILTON, San Francisco and Sacramento, California. 



$i.oo a Year. 

io Cents a Copy 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1901, by G. O. Shields* 
A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 

23 West 24TH Street 



G. O. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



New Vork 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 

PAGE 

He Shot Clear Out on the Sloping Ground Frontispiece 

An Unexpected Catch. Illustrated Don Cameron 85 

A Yucatan Shark Jacques H. Tracy 87 

Dog Days. Poem A. N. Kilgore 87 

Moose tor Dinner G eo. H . Root 89 

Chapman's Pond. Poem W. T. Duncan 90 

The Story of Tiny Tim. Illustrated Boyer Gonzales 91 

Whittier's Girl on a Trout Stream. Poem Frank White 92 

In the Coast Range A . W. Bitting 93 

An Adirondack Laker .H.R.Barnard 97 

Bills and Feet of Birds Geo. C. Embody 98 

Longing for the Country. Poem .C. M. Denison 100 

The Departure of the Birds R.R.Nicholson ioi" 

With the Shore Birds C.O. Zerralin 103 

Birds at Bailey's L. S. Keyser io5 

My First Lesson in Trapping Kate E. Norcross 107 

The Swamp Angel. Poem Frank H. Sweet 107 

Plateau Wildcat. Illustrated Allan Brooks 108 

Pete Made His Mark E. M.Leete 109 

Saranac Lake to Canada by Water Charles D. Fernald hi 

Farmer Brown's Experience- Poem W. A. Fuller na 

The Moose Head at the Pan-American G. H. Belaire 113 

Alaskan Game to be Saved 115 



From the Game Fields .' 116 

Fish and Fishing 124 

Guns and Ammunition 128 

Natural History 137 

The League of American Sportsmen 141 



Forestry 145 

Pure and Impure Foods 148 

Publisher's Notes 150 

Editor's Corner 151 

Amateur Photography 157 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, 1894. 




SHREDDED 
BISCUIT 

Some people go blindfolded through life regard- 
ing what food is best suited to sustain them, until 
their bodies become physical makeshifts and their 
minds correspondingly faulty. 

Shredded Whole Wheat Biscuit is a Naturally 
Organized Food, that is, contains all the prop- 
erties in correct proportion necessary to 
nourish every element of the human 
body. "Soft-cooked" cereals are swallowed 
without the necessary mastication, thus robbing 
the teeth of their NATURAL exercise, 
causing weakness and decay. Shredded 
Whole Wheat Biscuit, being crisp, com- 
pels vigorous mastication and 
causes the NATURAL flow 
of saliva which is necessary 
for NATURAL digestion. 
Sold by All Grocers. 

Don't "go it blind" but 
send for "The Vital 
Question" Cook Book 
(free). It will re- 
move the blindfold 
of habit. Address, 



THE NATURAL 
FOOD CO. 
iara Falls. N. Y| 



k Niag 



11 



RECREATION. 



Campers' Outfits 

- Do You Know 

ABERCROMBIE & FITCH 

2 SOUTH ST., NEW YORK CITY 




Everything to flake the Camper Comfortable and Happy 

We can advise you where and how to go. We are practical campers and have person- 
We have had twenty years' experience in ally tested all our goods. 

camping out. We guarantee everything we make to be the- 
We can furnish you with complete outfits. very best procurable. 

We Manufacture CAMP furniture, tents, sleeping bags, 

IZ==^=^= PACKS and PACK HARNESS, CLOTHING and PRO- 
VISION BAGS, TUMPLINES, PNEUMATIC BEDS 
and CUSHIONS, CANVAS FOLDING BUCKETS and WASH BASINS, FOLD- 
ING STOVES, ALUMINUM LANTERNS, BAKERS, STOVES, CLOTHING* 
MOCCASINS, ALUMINUM COOKING OUTFITS and Everything Else Used! 
by the Camper. 

Write for Catalogue "R." 



ABERCROMBIE & FITCH, 



2 SOUTH 
STREET 



New York City 



RECREATION. 



Ill 



rhmgs 

Sportsmen 
Want 






^ 



vs 



|HIS border illustrates 
some of our specialties 
for sportsmen. We have 
several other new special- 
ties just hot from the 

finishing room, which are in the 

Catalog "Adjust ready for distribution, 

and fully described. Mailed 

free to any address on 

receipt of request. 

Marble 
Safety Axe 
Company, 

Gladstone, Mich* 



Marble's implements are endorsed by 
prominent sportsmen from nearly 
every country on the globe. 



*\.00 







$1.0" 



to****. 



sat 







IV 



RECREATION. 




With a 



Kenwood Sleeping Bag 

you do not need a tent; you are pre- 
pared for any weather, hot or cold, 
wet or dry. It is a light, compact, 
warm covering that assures comfort 
every night. The construction is 
simple, sanitary and practical. Hun- 
dreds of experienced sportsmen are 
now using Kenwood Bags. 

Write us for prices, samples and 
full information. 

THE KENWOOD MILLS 

DEPARTMENT B, ALBANY, N. Y. 



St&itoJSi&rsjittoryjr/' 



I Here's a Conundrum: : 

«§» But it's awful easy to guess* * 

*§* • * 

Ǥ* How does it happen that the Page Woven * 

Ǥ* Wire Fence Co. have sold $50,000 worth more 
4* fencing in the first five months of ] 902 than they 
X sold in the years of 1 890- 1-2-3 an< ^ 4 altogether ? 
JL Second. Would it be possible for any corn- 
el* pany to so marvelously increase their sales, year 
4 after year, unless their product was all they 
4* claim for it? 

X Seven hundred thousand farmers are now using 

^ Page Fence, and the farmers are the most con- 
siderate and practical people we know. 



* 



4* 



Page Woven Wire Fence Co. 






Box 39. 



ADRIAN, MICHIGAN. 



»4> 



3**3 



RECREATION. 




Twentieth Century 

Electro- Vapor 

Launches 

ARE ideal gentlemen's launches, free from complications and care, and should appeal 
to the angler, the hunter, and every lover of nature, as they are designed with a 
view of supplying more genuine, healthful pleasure to the square inch than any- 
thing we know of. They are elegant to look at — a pleasure to ride in — easy to manage — 
safe and reliable. There is no heat, no smoke, no fire, no engineer or pilot, no govern- 
ment license required, no offensive odor, no noisy exhaust; under way in ten seconds. 
The most simple, economical, powerful and effective outfit ever offered. There are three 
thousand of these launches in use, and we ship them to all parts of the globe. They 
were used exclusively at the Pan-American and Omaha Expositions, where they carried 
thousands of delighted people. Why ? Because they were the best. A launch as shown 
above is 16 ft. long, and can be operated in 8 inches of water, enabling the angler and 
the hunter to invade the feeding grounds with ease. 

We build a 15 ft. Fishing Launch for $150 
" " " 16 «« Family " " 200 

" «« " 35 *« Cabin " " 1500 

Also a complete line of Steam and Sail Yachts— Row Boats — Hunting Boats — Canoes. 
Our 80-page catalog tells the truth about the best boats built, and it is yours for the 
asking. Send to-day and avoid the Spring rush. Address 



Racine Boat Mfg. Co. 

Riverside, Racine, Wis. 



vi RECREATION. 




LEY'S 



Lake Pleasant Inn 

Sacondaga Lake Hotel 

and Cottages. 

The finest trout fishing in the ADIRONDACKS, 

both stream and lake. Twenty different lakes and 
streams within a short walking distance of the house, 
well stocked with speckled trout, lake trout, landlocked 
salmon and rainbow trout. The hotels are situated on 
the highest occupied ground in the Adirondacks over- 
looking two of the most beautiful lakes in the region 
and with an uninterrupted view over mountains and 
lakes for twenty-five or thirty miles. Over one hundred 
mountain peaks can be counted from the hotel porches. 
This is not only the finest fishing resort in the wilder- 
ness but one of the best Summer Resorts. 

Golf Links, Tennis, 

Bowling, Boating, Bathing, 

Sanitary Plumbing, 
Excellent Table, 

Good Fishing, 

Good Woodcock, 

Grouse, Duck, 

and the very best Deer Shooting in the State. Send 

for artistic prOSpeCtUS. Mention Recreation. 

MORLEY 

Lake Pleasant, Hamilton Co., N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



vn 




iooo Island Rouse 



In the midst of the "Thousand Islands," 
the so-called "Venice of America," and 
really the most charming and delight- 
ful Summer Resort on the Continent. 

Send us two 2-cent stamps and we will mail you a 
beautifully illustrated guide book. Mention Recreation. 



O. G. STAPLES, 
G. DeWITT, 



Owners and Proprietors 



Alexandria Bay, n. V. 



vm 



RECREATION. 




Lackawanna 
Railroad 



A famous resort in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Penn- 
sylvania ; reached in 2^ hours from New York by fast 
express trains over the Lackawanna Railroad. Sur- 
rounded by delightful summer hotels at Stroudsburg, 
Forest Park, Spragueville, Bushkill, Dingman's, Delaware and 
Portland. " Mountain and Lake Resorts," a beautifully illustrated 
book, will give complete information about them. The book also 
contains a series of amusing vacation stories, entitled the " Experiences 
of Pa." Send 5 cents in postage stamps to T. W. Lee, General 
Passenger Agent, Lackawanna Railroad, New York City, and a copy 
will be mailed to you. 



RECREATION. 



IX 



rC 



^ 



UNTIL 

AND 

ishi: 

ROUNDS 

>F T#£ NORTHWEST 
ARE TRIBUTARY TO THE 




m 



m* 



yprlhis includes the prairie and laRe re -^1^ 
%ions of Minnesota, the mountains of ^Sf 
Montanajdaho, Washington and British 
Columbia; also Yellowstone Park a glori- 
ous trout preserve as well as Scenic 
Wonderland. 

Inquire of 7VIJRJ?. 

/Ztrents about low stop-over rates 
in effect during Atrgror&f 

Send 64 for WHERE TO HUNT AND FISH" 

25 «j for "CLIMBING MT. RAINIER^ 

■<j for "WONDERLAND 1902 

CHAS.S.FEE, GEN. PASS'GR AGENT, 
ST. PAWL, MINN. 



RECREATION. 




SummerMsures 




MMHB ■ iMimnuM 



THE choice of the route has much to do with the success and pleasure of an outing. 
Probably nowhere in the world can a person secure more real, delightful comfort on 
a railway journey than on the great trains over the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Ry 
The splendid construction of this road, in track and equipment, and its pleasantness of route makes 
every mile one of comfort and pleasure. 

As a route for summer vacation travel the Lake Shore is unexcelled, reaching by its 
through trains, or by direct connections, practically all the summer places east and west. 

The following books will be sent free by the undersigned : " Book of Trains," telling 
about the service} "Vacation Journeys," containing a select list of tours to and via the St. 
Lawrence River 5 the Adirondack and White Mountains 5 the Atlantic Coast ; New England ; 
Niagara Falls; Lake Chautauqua, etc., with rates from Chicago, 111., Toledo and Cleveland, O.j 
and an illustrated, descriptive book about Lake Chautauqua resorts. 

We shall be pleased to render any assistance and information in your vacation plans this 
summer. Address A. J. Smith, g. p. & t. a., Cleveland, O. 



Southern Railway 

Foremost in establish- 
ing- high-class service to 
the commercial centres and Winter resorts of the South. In the territory covered by its vast net- 
work lineSaU modern improvements are adopted, and on no railroad in America will be found 
Zre luxurious service, operating its trains from ^New York to Washington over the Pennsylvania 
Railroad and thence via Southern Railway, etc. 

_. ,, Three fast trains daily from New York 

Atlanta, Chattanooga, Dirmingham, with super b Pullman Sleeping and Dining 
~* Car Service The Route of the Washington and Southwestern 

New Orleans, Texas, Limited Connections at New Orleans with Southern Pacific 
^ ,r • Observation Car New York to Atlanta. Pullman tourist Sleeping 

Mexico and Calilornia Q ar Washington to San Francisco without change, Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. During tourist season Special Sunset Limited Car Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays. 

a ' Three superbly equipped last trains during 

Savannah, Charleston, /Vvigvista, t he tourist season, giving the most satisfactory 

.,, schedule. Sleeping and Dining Car Service to the 

JeKyll Island, 1 homasville, Winter resorts of Georgia, the Carolinas and Honda. 

, ^ , Connections both at Miami and Tampa with the Penin- 

Florida, Nassau and *^vi£>a sular and Occidental Steamship Line for Key West, 
Havana and Nassau The route of the Southern's Palm Limited operated during the tourist season. 

A . , .,, M + c • . "The Land Three fast express 

Pinehurst, A-sHeville, tlot Springs, of the SKy." trains giving all the com- 

_, i u c • ' A "U Iort anc * l ux_ 

Memphis, NasKville, Tenn., and Hot Springs, y\rt\. uries of mod . 
ern travel. Leaving New York daily for the greatest health resorts of America. 



The service 01 the Southern Railway, particularly that ol its palatial train, the ''SOUTHERN'S P >LM 
LIMITED™ and 'WASHINGTON and SOUTHWESTERN LIMITEu," i^ the highest development 01 
luxurious raifw^y traveL The southern's road bed is the best and its schedule is the lastest in the. enure 
Sout" while its Pullmans are the latest, an 1 linesl, and its scenic attractions are mannerless and unnv led. 



New York Offices: 271 and 1185 BROADWAY 

W. A. TURK, Pass. Truffle Manager. S. H. Hardwic.k, Gen. Pass. Agent, ALEX. S. TIIWEATT, East 



Washington, I). C. 



Pass. Agent, 
1185 Broadway, corner 28th St., N. t. 



RECREATION. 



XI 




The way to get the best accommodations is via the 

Great Rock Island Route 

WHY ? It is the only direct line to Colorado Springs and Manitou. 
It is the popular route to Denver. It has the best Dining Car Service. 
It has the finest equipment and most satisfactory schedule and in the 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN LIMITED 

offers the best train; only one night, Chicago to Colorado. It leaves Chicago daily at 5.45 p. m. 
and arrives at Denver at 8.45 p. m., Colorado Springs (Manitou) 8.30 p. m. 

Another inducement to use the Rock island will be the low round trip rates of 
$25 from Chicago to Colorado and $| 5 from Missouri River Points to Colorado, effective this 
summer by that line. Ask for details and free books. 

* 'Under the Turquoise Sky" gives the breeziest and most fascinating description of 
Colorado. "Camping in Colorado* ' has full details for campers. Anglers will want "Fishing 
in Colorado." 

JOHN SEBASTIAN. General Passenger Agent. CHICAGO. 



Xll 



RECREATION. 



A BOOK 

FOR 

Sportsmen and Vacationists, 



ISSUED BY THE 



Bangor e^ Aroostook R. R. 



AND ENTITLED 



ii 




¥f 



Is a Guide to the Fishing, Hunting 
and Camping Regions of 

NORTHERN MAINE. 



175 pages. Illustrated by over 100 half- 
tone cuts of scenery, fish and game. 
Handsomely designed. 
SENT FOR 10c. IN STAMPS. 



Address : 

GEO. fl. HOUGHTON, Traffic flgr. 
BANGOR, ME. 

Mention Recreation. 



THE 

THOUSAND 

ISLANDS 



There may be somewhere on the 
earth a more delightful region than 
that of the Thousand Islands, but if 
there is, it has not been discovered. 
It is the Venice of America, but also 
has good hotels that can be kept warm 
if there shall happen to be a cold 
rainy evening. It is as fine as the 
Bay of Naples, with 2,000 picturesque 
Islands scattered along the twenty- 
five miles of one of the most beautiful 
rivers in the world. You can find out 
a great deal regarding it in No. 10 
of the "Four-Track Series," "The 
Thousand Islands." Copy will be 
mailed free on receipt of a 2-cent 
stamp by George H. Daniels, General 
Passenger Agent, New York Central 
& Hudson River Railroad, Grand 
Central Station, New York. 



Fins and Feathers 

are plentiful along the line of the 



FRISCO 

SYSTEM 



St. Louis and San Francisco R.R. Go, 

Kansas City, Memphis and Birmingham R. R. 
SHOR.T LINE TO 

MISSOURI, KANSAS, ARKANSAS, 
INDIAN AND OKLAHOMA TERRITORIES 

Texas and Mexico 

VIA ST. LOUIS, KANSAS CITY, MO., 
OR MEMPHIS 

Write for illustrated literature of interest to real 
sportsmen. 

Vestibuled Pullman Buffet Sleeper, through with- 
out change between New York and Memphis, Tenn., 
via Washington, D. C, Atlanta, Ga., and Birming- 
ham, Ala., in connection with Pennsylvania R. R. 
and Southern Ry. 

F. D. RUSSELL A. HILTON 

General Eastern Agent General Passenger Agent 
385 B'way, New York St. Louis, Mo. 



*♦♦ 



Co "tfte" Pleasure Resorts of. 



Cexas ana Gulf of mexico 



TAKE 




Via CHICAGO, KANSAS CITY, or 
ST. LOUIS 

WAGNER BUFFET SLEEPERS 

FREE "KATY" CHAIR CARS 

For further information, address 

W. S. ST. GEORGE, Gen. East. Agt. 
308 Broadway, New York 



RECREATION. 



xni 



fortfolios 

NEW ENGLAND LAKES: 
RIVERS OF 
NEW ENGLAND, i 
MOUNTAINS OF 



SEASHORE OF 
NEW ENGLAND. 
! PICTURESQUE 

NEW ENGLAND 

( Historic — Miscellaneous 
Will be sent upon receipt of 6 CENTS 
FOR EACH BOOK. 



Reached by tl\e 



rovincES 



'W*$ St 



Illustrated descriptive pamphlet 1 (containing complete maps) have 
been issued under the following titles, and will be mailed 
upon receipt of 2 CENTS in stamps for each book. 

ALL ALONGSHORE. LAKE SUNAPEE, 
AMONG THE MOUNTAINS, SOUTHEAST NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
LAKES AND STREAMS, SOUTHWEST NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
FISHING AND HUNTING, CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS, 
MERRIMACK VALLEY, LAKE MEMPHREMACOG, 

THE MONADNOCK REGION, 
VALLEY °™ CONNECTICUT *ZB NORTHERN VERMONT, 
THE HOOSAC COUN TRY^!™ DE ERFIELD VALLEY. 

COLORED BIRDS EYE VIEW FROM MT. WASHINGTON 
SENT ON RECEIPT OF G CTS. IN STAMPS. 

A Summer Tourist Booffjivi/y I/sf of tours and rates, Aotei 
and board/ny house list, and other va/uab/e in forma >/ ion, free. 

For All Publications Apply To 
Passenger Department, b.&m.r.r. boston, Mass. 

O* *J. flinders , gen'l pass'r & ticket agent. 



...NO THE MOST CHARMING 

tjH supimer 

4335 RESORTS 

IN AMEKICA 

1O0O FEET ABOVE SEA LEVEL 




HIGHLANDS 
of ONTARIO 



M U S K'OK A LAKES DISTRICT 

LAKE O F BAYS RE C I O N 

flAGNETAWAN RIVERVGEORCIAN BAY 

KAWARlfHA LAKES 

Lakes simcoe^ couch iching 

EASY OF ACCESS 
IMnUNITY FROM HAY FEVER 
NEW irrODERN MOTELS 

FR FF ILLUSTRATED 
I IV LL PUB LI CATIONS 

CAS/B£ ffAG FAOM GftANp TM/HKfiAtLWAY SYSTEff 
i AADKESS NEAREST OEF/CE 



Boston, Mass., . - 
Buffalo, N. Y., . . 
Chicago, III., 
Detroit, Mich.. . 
Grand Rapids, Mich 
Hamilton, Ont., . 
Kingston, Ont.,< . 
Los Angeles, Cal., 
Montreal, Que., . 
New York, N. Y., . 
San Francisco, Cal„ 
St. Paul, Minn., 
Toronto, Ont., 



. T. Wynne, . 306 Washington Street. 

. J. D. McDonald, 285 Main St. (Ellicott Square Bldg ). 
. J. H. Burgis, 249 Clark St., Cor. Jackson Boulevard. 
. Geo. W. Watson, ..... 124 Woodward Avenue 

. C. A Justin, Morton House Block. 

. C. E. Morgan, .... 11 James Street, North. 
. J. P. Hanley, . Corner Ontario and Johnston streets. 

. W. H. Bullen California Bank Building. 

. J. Quinlan, Bonaventure Station. 

. F. P. Dwyer, . . . Dun Building, 290 Broadway. 
. W. O. Johnson, ...".... 219 Front Street. 
. David Brown, jr., .... Ill Endicott Arcade. 
. M. C. Dickson, Union Station. 



oftto Ca .T \ B J& LjL, 

GEC/sfS fit A L PA $> SEMCE/i A AfO TICKET A i 

MONTREAL,CANADA. 



/TfA/T/0>V THIS 



XIV 



RECREATION. 



FOR 34 YEARS A STANDARD PIANO. " 



4 4 



The Wing Piano 



VOTT IMFlnn HTWT^ ROOK" IF YOU INTEND TO BUY A PIANO. A book 
X\J\J LHLJl-dLJ 1 111 J I->\J\JL\. —not a catalogue— that gives you all the informa- 
tion possessed by experts. It makes the selection of a piano easy. If read carefully, it will make you 
a judge of tone, action, workmanship, and finish; will tell you how to know good from bad. It de- 
scribes the materials used ; gives pictures of all the different parts, and tells how they should be made 
and put together. It is the only book of its kind ever published. It contains u6 large pages, and is 
named "The Book of Complete Information About Pianos." We send it free to anyone wishing 
to buy a piano. Write for it. 

C A \7"C T7Df"M\7T <t f Cid HPO <f)Hn We make the WING PIANO and sell it our- 
JAVL riVWlVl J)>UU 1 \J .pZUU selves. It goes direct from our factory to 
your home. We do not employ any agents or salesmen. When you buy the WING PIANO you pay 
the actual cost of construction and our small wholesale profit. This profit is small because we sell 
thousands of pianos yearly. Most retail stores sell no more than twelve to twenty pianos yearly, and 
must charge from $ioo to $200 profit on each- They can't help it. 




A Wing style — 45 other styles to select from. 
qemT HM THDTAT we pay freight, no money in advance. We win 

OH1N 1 \J\M 1 IVl/VL^ send any WING PIANO to any part of the United States on 
trial. We pay freight in advance and do not ask for any advance payment or deposit. If the piano is 
not satisfactory after twenty days' trial in your home, we take it back entirely at our expense. You pay 
us nothing unless you keep the piano. There is absolutely no risk or expense to you. 

Old instruments taken in exchange. EASY MONTHLY PAYJIENTS. 

INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT fcEf !/ e S^ £E£ 

the tones of the mandolin, guitar, harp, zither and banjo. 

IN 34 YEARS 33,000 PIANOS 



We refer to over 33,000 satisfied purchasers 

in every part of the United States. WING 

PIANOS are guaranteed for twelve years against any defect in tone, action, workmanship, or material. 

Are just as carefully made as Wing Pianos. They have a sweet, 
powerful, lasting tone, easy action, very handsome appearance, need 

no tuning. Wing Organs are sold direct from the factory, sent on trial ; are sold on easy monthly 

payments. For catalogue and prices write to 



WING ORGANS 



WING & SON, 



226 and 228 East J2th St., 
NEW YORK. 
J868— 34th Year— 1902. 



RECREATION. 



xv 



TWO DOLLARS 

FOR A NAME 



We want your dealers' 
name ( Stationer, Jeweler or 
Druggist) and as an induce- 
ment for you to send it to 
us, we will send postpaid, 
your choice of these popular 
styles 

LAUGHLIN FOUNTAIN PEJI 

Superior to the $3.00 grades 
of other makes, for the name, 
and only 




By regisie. eu mail 8c extra. 



If you do not find the pen 
las represented, and superior 
[ in every respect to any pen 
'you ever used, return it and 
I get your $1 back, as the pen is 

SENT ON APPROVAL 

To Responsible People. 



It Costs you Nothing: 

to try it a week. Safety 
Pocket Pen Holder sent with 
each pen 

FREE OF CHARGE 

This pen will make a gift 
of never ending usefulness 
and a constant pleasant re- 
minder of the giver. 

Do not miss this oppor- 
tunity to secure a $3 value at 
a price that is only a frac- 
tion of its real worth. Finest 
grade 14 Karat Gold Pen, 
and guaranteed. Everybody 
knows that in Fountain Pens 
the 

LAUGH LIN 

has no equal and is always 
sold under the express con- 
ditions that if not entirely 
satisfactory, your money re- 
funded. 



Address 




LAUGHLIN MFG. CO. 

424 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 



THE 



EQUITABLE 



J.W.ALEXANDER 

PRESIDENT 




J.H.HYDE 

VICE PRESIDENT 



YOU 
KNOW 

That you can buy 
5%Gold Bonds on in- 
stallments -and mean- 
while have them insured. 

A good investment 
for you - if you live. A 
splendid protection 
for your/a/n// y-\{ 
you die. 

For full information//// 
up and mail coupon below 



THE EQUITABLE SOCIETY, 

Dept. No. 16 120 Broadway, New York 
Please send me information regarding your 
new issue of Gold Bonds. Base figures 
on a block of $ 

issued to a man years of age. 

Name 

Address 



RECREATION. 



Could any offer be fairer P 

We will send you FOUR FULL QUARTS of HAYNER'S SEVEN-YEAR-OLD RYE for $3.20, and we will pay 
the express charges. Try it and if you don't find it all right and as good as you can buy from 
anybody else for double the money, send it back at our expense and your $3.20 will be prompt- 
ly refunded. Bear in mind that this offer is backed by a company with a capital of $500,000.00, 
paid in full, and the proud reputation of 36 years of continuous success. We are regularly sup- 
plying over a quarter of a million satisfied customers, convincing evidence that our whiskey pleases 
and that we do just as we say. Won't you let us send you a trial order? You run no risk in 
accepting this offer for your money will be refunded at once if you are not perfectly satisfied. 
Shipment made in a plain sealed case, no marks or brands of any kind to indicate contents. 
Orders for Ariz., Cal.,Col., Idaho, Mont., Nev., N. Mex., Ore., Utah, Wash., or Wyo., must be on the 
basis of 4 quarts for $4.00 by EXPRESS PREPAID or 20 Quarts for $16.00 by FREIGHT PREPAID. 

Direct from our distillery to YOU 

Saves dealers' profits, 
Prevents adulteration. 

HAYNER 
WHISKEY 

PURE SEVEN YEAR OLD RYE. 

FULL QUARTS $ 





EXPRESS CHARGES PAID RY US. 



We make at our own distillery every gallon of whiskey we sell, and our entire 
product is sold direct to consumers, thus insuring absolutely pure whiskey and sav- 
ing you the big profits of the dealers. Don't for a moment imagine that HAYNER 
WHISKEY is "poor stuff" and used only by people who can't afford to buy higher 
priced goods. On the contrary, we have had for years the patronage of thousands 
of the wealthiest and most prominent business and professional men in every sec- 
tion of this country, — the very people who can afford the best and wouldn't be sat- 
isfied with anything but the best. Do you think we could hold their trade if our 
whiskey wasn't all right? HAYNER WHISKEY has no superior at any price and is used 
alike by millionaires and men of moderate incomes, simply because it gives perfect 
satisfaction and they will not throw away their money by paying a dealer two or 
three times as much for whiskey certainly no better than HAYNER, if as good. 
Won't you let us save YOU money? Write our nearest ottice and do it NOW. 




ESTABLISHED 
1866. 



THE HAYNER DISTILLING COMPANY, 

DAYTON, OHIO. ST. LOUIS, MO. ST. PAUL, MINN. 



DISTILLERY 
TROY, 0. 



HAYNER'S 

SEVEN YEAR 01D , 



S^AYNERUfSTlLlW'tf 




HE SHOT CLEAR OUT ON THE SLOPING GROUND. 



RECREATION 



Volume XVIL 



AUGUST, 1902. 
G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager 



Number 2* 



AN UNEXPECTED CATCH. 



DON CAMRON. 



The day was perfect for trout ; the 
sun just visible through the soft gray 
clouds, a South wind blowing gently 
and the waters of Big creek run- 
ning black over the stones. Perfect, 
because the trout knew that in such 
weather they could move out from 
their secluded hiding places into the 
swift, darkened waters of the stream 
without being observed, and from the 
mossy side of a rock or a sunken log 
they could watch with red-rimmed, 
protruding eyes for floating dainties. 

I was carefully working my way 
down the stream, using the finest of 
tackle and fishing with all the skill I 
possessed. The water was high and 
the ground well fished, and, as usual, 
the big fellows were more than shy. 
Six already lay in my basket, and the 
day was young. 

Just below where I was fishing, the 
stream is joined by a small creek, the 
outlet to a dainty little lake snugly 
nestled in the hills about a mile away. 
This lake is stocked with big mouth 
black bass, and at certain times of the 
year affords excellent fishing. Occa- 
sionally some of these bass work down 
the brook into Big creek, and many 
a good one has been caught in the 
big, deep hole where the streams 
join. 

As I approached the place a certain 
unexplainable condition of the water, 
which can only be seen by anglers, 
told me there was a big fish in the 
pool, and I resolved to do my best to 
hook him. From behind a friendly 
willow scrub I made a cast. Twice I 
sent the flies hissing through the air 
across the water, to drv the feathers 



and attract a possible fish's atten- 
tion. The third time I let them sink, 
fluttering down close beside a large 
patch of muddy foam. The Reuben 
Wood tail fly scarcely touched the 
water when a huge bass lurched half 
out and closed 2 rows of teeth 
around it. I was frightened, and must 
confess I trembled like a tender- 
foot, but instantly resolved to fight 
to the last ditch. Instinctively I gave 
that well known twitch of the wrist 
and fastened the barbed steel deep into 
his bony jaws. The next instant he 
sprang clear of the water and fell with 
a whack on the slackened line. Then 
came a lunge so quick and unexpected 
that he snapped off a foot and a half 
from the tip of my io-ounce lance- 
wood, instantly changing it into a re- 
spectable bass rod. 

The piece of tip slid down the taut 
line close to the fish's mouth, greatly 
hindering him in his actions. Again 
and again he jumped, the piece of steel 
rattling against his scaly sides and 
goading him on to greater fury. Over 
he went, skipping and splashing over 
the water like a flat stone. It was only 
by luck that I slackened the line at the 
right moment. I have hooked many 
a big fish but I never saw one so gamy 
as he was. From the first I realized 
that I could never land him with such 
light tackle and a remnant of a rod. It 
was only a question of time when he 
would get a fair pull. Then something 
would part. 

Up and down he dashed, trying in 
every imaginable way to throw his 
weight on the line. I gave the reel 
just brake enough to keep a steady 



85 



86 



RECREATION. 



pull at his head, and avoid a tug-of- 
war which would have resulted in a di- 
vision of the tackle. Forward and back 
he flashed, with changes that were 
almost too complicated for human in- 
genuity to understand, apparently get- 
ting fresher and madder every minute. 
Inch by inch the reserved line van- 
ished from my reel, and I was waist 
deep in the water. Suddenly he dashed 
straight down the stream and I can 
safely say I made the first hundred 
yards in less than 12 seconds. My 
crippled rod curled and twisted until I 
could hardly hold it, as I crowded on 
the brake, for the last few feet of line 
were rapidly slipping off the reel. 1 
held his head high and kept him close 



to the shore so he could not have the 
help of the swift water. 

A little below me the creek turned 
sharply, and it was evident the bass 
was either unacquainted with the place 
or too excited to notice it, for instead 
of making the turn he shot clear out on 
the sloping gravel and flopped over 
into a pool of stagnant water, stranded 
high and wet. 

A madder fish I never saw. He was 
so mad and full of fight that I had to 
rap him on the head to keep him from 
flopping himself to pieces and destroy- 
ing his beauty. That evening I weighed 
him in the village grocery amid a 
crowd of admiring spectators. He 
tipped the beam at jy 2 pounds. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. E. C. GIBBS. 



CURIOSITY. 

Made with an Eastman Kodak a-nd a Bausch & Lomb Lens. 



A YUCATAN SHARK. 



JACQUES H. TRACY. 



Perched on the ship's rail, we parboiled 
under the hot Mexican sun, and intently 
watched the rapid motions of a shark co- 
quetting with the ripe pork at the end of 
our line. He could not decide to take it, as it 
was Friday, so our hopes were alternately 
raised and dashed as he one moment popped 
up and circled around the bait, then dived 
out of sight. A Northern constitution can 
not long stand a thrill a minute, under such 
a sun, so we gave him up at last, and re- 
treated to the smoking room. As the 
soothing aroma of good tobacco sifted 
through the air, the chief became reminis- 
cent. 

"The shark census has fallen off some- 
what here," he said. "There used to be a 
dozen for one now ; and such pampered 
tastes as these have ! That fellow's been 
turning up his nose at the cook's good pork 
for the best part of the morning and it's 
an even chance that he'll not take it at all. 
We used to heat a shot red hot, rap it in 
a rag, and drop it overboard, and by the 
time it hit the water a shark had it. He 
made the water boil ! The cook used to 
lower a bucket over the side for some of 
the water to boil eggs with ! Once we were 



about a day's run from Progreso, when we 
spotted a shark in our wake. There was 
nothing remarkable about that, but he 
seemed as long as a skiff and as slender 
as a plank. After we reached Progreso 
the passengers concluded to catch that 
shark and see what was the matter with 
him; so they borrowed my tackle and we 
all piled aft, to see the fun. He took the 
bait and bolted, but we soon tired him 
out, hoisted him aboard and I shot him. 
When he had stopped slapping around, a 
Mexican produced a carver from some- 
where about his raiment, which consisted 
of shirt and drawers, and slit the shark 
open." 

"Of course you found your great grand- 
father's gold plated Waterbury, which 
had been dropped overboard at Hong Kong, 
still keeping standard time?" we queried 
wearily. 

"No," declared the chief, "the coroner's 
evidence showed that the shark had swal- 
lowed an empty water cask, open end out, 
and everything he had eaten in weeks had 
gone into that barrel. He starved to 
death." 



DOG DAYS. 



A. N. KILGORE. 



Sho, 

Feel too dog-gone lazy t' live. 

'D like t' stop my works jes' a minit 

An' let 'em rest. Gee whiz ! 

What wouldn't I give 

T' flop right down 'longside some crick 

An' do nothin' 'cept watch th' skate-bugs, 

An' let th' shadders play peek-a-boo 

Over my homely features. 

Don't b'lieve I'd want t' watch th' bugs 

nuther — 
Too much trouble. Let 'em watch me. 
Nope, wouldn't want t' fish. T' much like 

work. 
Wouldn't want t' do nothin' 
But lay there an' mope. 
'Twould make me tired t' even hear th' 
Crickets workin' thereselves t' death. 
'Twould by jing. 
'D have t' shet my eyes 
So 's I couldn't see th' leaves 



A wigglin' 'round on their rickety stems. 

Wind's doin' that. 

Why in thunder don't it stop workin' too? 

No, _ 

I b'lieve I'd let it blow. 

'Cause if it stopped, I'd have t' fan. An' 

I ain't real stuck on that idee. 

'Nother thing. I wouldn't want 

T' hear no potterin' stream 

Sloshin' over no rocks. 

'Twould be too irritatin' t' my nerves. 

Stream 'd have t' shet up while I was 

there. 
An' if any feller come monkeyin' 'round, 
Abustin' up th' harmony o' my surround- 

in's, 
After I got settled, 
I'd settle him. 

Only 'twould take too much trouble. 
Oh, Hanner ! But how 
I could loaf jes' about now. 



87 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY ANDREW EMERINE JR. 



AN IRISH STEW. 
Highly commended in Recreation's Sixth Annual Photo Competition. 




REACHING. 
Made with Premo Camera. 



AMAT.FUR PHOTO BYJ-..F NE.VCOMjB 



MOOSE FOR DINNER. 



GEO. II. ROOT. 



October n, 1898, I started with T. A. 
Strait, an old time hunter, trapper and 
guide, on a 30 days' hunt for big game. 
Thad is a dead shot, an expert with the 
rod, and an ideal hunting companion. I 
was intensely proud as I climbed on our 
wagon, behind 4 ponies, and rolled away 
to the North, where in the distance shone 
the snowy peaks of the Rockies. 

Before we had gone 5 miles Mr. Strait 
had bargained with me to take it day about 
rustling camp meat and it fell to my lot 
to get game for supper. I got it. Just 
before we went into camp I caught sight 
of 2 lean, old sage cocks, and when they 
raised I dropped them both. Mr. Strait 
objected strongly to that kind of diet, and 
said many times before we started home, 
that he wished he had agreed to furnish 
all the camp meat himself. 

Nothing broke the monotony of our 
desert drive until we reached Cottonwood 
creek, where he saw thousands of ante- 
lope. 

By October 226. we were settled in our 
permanent camp. One morning we saw a 
band of elk coming down the mountain 
North of the camp. They were about 200 
yards away, and in less time than it takes 
to tell it, each of us had one down. The re- 
mainder of the band had turned into the 
timber and were out of sisrht. We had shot 
them from our very door, and onlv 125 yards 
away. When we saw no more were com- 
ing we finished our breakfast. It took us 
till noon to take care of our game. We 
spent the remainder of the day in the moun- 
tains and saw many fresh elk signs. At 
night a bunch of 10 or 12 came within 
half a mile of our camp. 

The next day, as I started to climb the 
long mountain slope, to get out of the can- 
yon, I could see, away to the Northwest, 
a snow storm coming, and, by the time I 
had reached the top it was upon me. From 
the top of the mountain I plunged directly 
into the dense forest, out of the storm, 
and suddenly found myself on a high preci- 
pice overlooking the North branch of Horse 
creek, thence down the steep mountain side, 
to the lead of the creek. I followed the 
creek about a mile and turned into the 
forest, where I came upon a trapper's de- 
serted cabin, buried away in the thickest 
of the forest. The door, which was made 
of elk skin, stood ajar. I pushed it wide 
open with the end of my rifle, and a wild 
commotion followed. I thought I had 
disturbed a meeting of wildcats, or a family 
of bears. It was too late to retreat honor- 
ably, so I ventured a peep within. It was 



only wood rats, hurrying and scurrying 
they knew not where, only to hide. Inside 
the hut, and strewn on the dirt floor, were 
skeletons of bear paws, so closely resemb- 
ling human bones, that the sight of them 
made me shudder. On the floor and nailed 
on the walls were skull bones of all the 
animals that belong to the mountain. I did 
not stay long in that gruesome place. 

October 30th I made my record. Mr. 
Strait had gone out early to look for elk, 
while I stayed in camp to do our week's 
washing. I had my laundry spread on the 
sage brush, and had started dinner, when 
I stepped to the tent door and saw a moose 
standing not over 100 yards away. At 
first I hardly knew what it was. I do not 
know how long we stood looking at each 
other when I remembered I had a gun in 
the tent. In the few seconds it took me 
to step back and pick uo my gun, the moose 
had started to climb the mountain. When 
I returned, gun in hand, ready for action, 
he had gone over 75 yards, at a swinging 
trot, and was just entering a belt of tim- 
ber. I fired, tumbling him in a heap. Of 
course, it was a scratch, but I did not care. 
I had the moose. 

Somehow I had no desire to rush up to 
my moose, but went about fixing my dinner 
for fully 20 minutes before I strated to 
climb up to him. During that period I had 
looked at him several times, but could not 
see him move, and it puzzled me to know 
why he did not struggle. When I started 
to climb up to see how he was getting 
along I took sounders on him. I was slip- 
ping alonsr cautiously and was not more 
than 40 yards from him when I stepped 
on a dry brush. My blood chilled when 
he jumped to his feet and began to look for 
me ! He was bristling all over and gave a 
snort that could have been heard a mile. 
Thanks to the protection of a small pine tree 
behind which I was standing, he could not 
see me. While he was searching in the 
direction of the sound he had heard, I let 
him have it square in the face and down he 
went again. That time I felt sure he was 
down for good, but not so. I kept above 
him, and behind the pine tree where I 
could see him and wait for him to die. 
It seemed he had no notion of dying, how- 
ever. After waiting a while I threw a 
small stick which struck him fairly on the 
side and up he came. That time his at- 
tention was riveted on the spot where I 
had stepped on the brush, and I was in 
the rear. Blood was streaming from his 
nostrils, his long shaggy mane, or hair, 
seemed all standing on end, and he looked, 



9° 



RECREATION. 



indeed, a formidable foe. I was in no 
mood to view his grandeur, but put a ball 
at the butt of his ear, which finished him. 
My first shot, from the tent, had creased 
him. This method is frequently used in 
capturing horses. It stuns the animal for 
a short time only, and seldom proves fatal. 
When creased, an animal will lie apparent- 



ly dead 5 to 25 minutes. It will then sud- 
denly spring to its feet, and if it has not 
been tied securely away it goes. 

My second shot was a trifle too low to 
break into the brain, and would probably 
have killed him in time. My third and last 
shot that struck the butt of the ear, went 
direct to the brain and ended his struggles. 



CHAPMAN'S POND. 



W. T. DUNCAN. 



J know a lake near a mountain side 
That rises and falls with the flowing tide ; 
For between the lake and the river clear 
A raceway runs athwart the mere. 

And the river runs to the sound afar, 
Till it weds the sea at Saybrook bar ; 
Going and coming from tide to tide 
With the grace of a coy, reluctant bride. 

On its edge the willowy wild oats grow, 
And mirror their wealth in the flood below ; 
There the wood duck floats on its placid 

breast, 
And the marsh wren buildeth her swaying 

nest. 

Here the rail birds rise in their short- 
winged flight, 

'Neath its sheltering arms again to light, 

Screened by its growth from the piercing 
eye 

Of the fleet-winged hawk that soars on 
high. 

By its wooded edge you can hear the hum 
Of the ruffed grouse sounding his amorous 

drum, 
While over its Waves the swallows dart 
With a grace surpassing the hand of art. 



Beneath the water that laves the edge 
The pickerel hides in his home of sedge, 
On eager watch for the prey that glide 
Along with the shimmering, limpid tide. 



Away on the mountain's noble crest 
The eagle builds his eyrie nest, 
Where a forest giant stricken dead 
Defiant rears his ghostlike head. 



One cottage alone these shores doth grace, 

Built by a hermit that loved the place ; 

A man who from boyhood had known the 

spell 
Of each leafy nook and woodland dell ; 

Who sought, when the city's strife was o'er, 
Repose and peace by its verdant shore, 
And breathed his las* 'neath the sheltering 

wood, 
With a name unknown for aught but good. 

Oft by his sunlit, shadowy shore 
I cleave the waves with the dripping oar ; 
Secure 'mid this scene of calm repose 
From the world outside, with its wiles and 
woes. 



"There's some talk of a lawyers' trust." 

"Indeed?" 

"Yes; and it is said they'll make a 
specialty of drawing up anti-trust bills for 
the legislatures."— Puck, 



THE STORY OF TINY TIM. 



With flash of lightning, mutter of 
thunder, torrents of rain, and the wailing 
of a fierce Norther, Tiny Tim came. He 
was a bird, scarcely larger than a hummer, 
known to ornithologists as the cerulean 
warbler, or little bluish grey flycatcher. 



HOYER GONZALES. 

dashed into a showcase window of a gun 
store and fell insensible to the floor. He 
was picked up and tenderly cared for. In 
a few minutes he revived and soon became 
bright and lively again. He was so frail 
that the pressure of a finger and thumb 




BREAKFAST TIME. 



He had probably left his Northern home the 
previous fall, and, following his instinct, had 
become an aerial wanderer, drifting far into 
the tropics, like a bit of paper, on an air 
current. With returning spring there had 
come within his tiny breast the usual re- 
sistless impulse to visit his far away 
Northern home, and with admirable forti- 
tude he had started on his long journey of 
2,000 or 3,000 miles, guided by no one 
knows what. About one-third of the dis- 
tance had been accomplished, when he had 
been overtaken by the terrific sub-tropical 
storm. Unable to battle against it, he was 



would have made him a shapeless mite, yet 
we knew that since his advent into the 
world he had yearly flown more than 1,000 
miles from his Northern home into the 
tropics and back, flying with faith and in- 
stincts that none can explain. 

From the first he showed no fear of man, 
but would perch on our fingers, and preen 
himself and ruffle his feathers saucily. 
Small wonder that we grew attached to 
him. He had injured one of his wings, 
and although he made frantic efforts to 
catch flies he could not be quick enough. 
We took the cue, and thereafter everyone 



9' 



92 



RECREATION. 



became a flycatcher and the little fellow 
lived like a prince. He soon learned from 
what source his food came, and had a cun- 
ning fashion of hopping down on the end 
of a penholder, held in a pen rack, and wait- 
ing for someone to feed him. He had no 
favorites, but would sit contentedly on any- 
one's hand. 

He greatly enjoyed sun baths. The mite 
would take his position in the center of a 
flood of sunshine and revel in it, pecking 
at unlucky flies, arranging his feathers, and 
stretching his wings. His enforced visit 
had been noted by the local papers, and 
many ladies and children called daily to see 
him and pay him homage. Perched on 
someone's fingers he would be taken to va- 
rious windows, where flies were bumping 
their heads in vain efforts to get out. These 
flies were doomed. The little fellow never 
missed them. 

As dusk approached, Tim would hop 



along his home, a great standing desk, jump 
up on the pen rack, from there to the gas 
jet, and then on to the bracket that supports 
the globe. There, hidden, with the excep- 
tion of his tail, he would tuck his head un- 
der his wing, and bid the world goodnight. 
Morning found him bright and hungry, and 
his appetite surprised us. His hunger sat- 
isfied, he would then enjoy a bath, and dry 
himself in the sun, after which he assumed 
control of his desk. He was one of us. 

For 10 days, Tiny Tim lived a happy 
life, winning great admiration and affection, 
and a bountiful supply of food, but he was 
destined to meet a tragic death. No cat 
or rat took part in the tragedy. Woe unto 
either that had been seen in the vicinity! 
One morning, while jumping at a fly, and 
not having the perfect use of one wing, 
Tim fell into a tin envelope holder and 
broke his neck. His death cast a gloom 
over the whole office. 




WHITTIER'S GIRL ON A TROUT 
STREAM. 

FRANK WHITE. 

Maud Muller on a summer's day 
Whipped a trout stream far away. 
Deftly she cast with hook and fly, 
But some way or other the trout were shy. 

Now, Maud, she was a city lass, 

And, of course, her rig was A first class ; 

Her tailor-made suit was up to date, 

And her split bamboo of very light weight. 

Her form was lithe and her face was fair, 
But the slippery rocKs made her fairly 

swear ; 
She whipped the stream for many a mile, 
And then sat down to rest awhile. 

A country bey, with a pin for a hook, 
Came slowly wandering toward the brook. 
He cut him a pole and bent his pin, 
And then proceeded to wade right in. 

Late that night, on her way to camp, 
With both feet wet and hair all damp 
Maud mused like this, "Had I a pin, 
There is no telling what there might have 
been." 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY C. C SPEIGHT. 



ON THE WATCH-TOWER. 
(Sand Swallows.) 



She (in the midst of the quarrel). — Oh! 
I wish I were a man ! 

He. — So do I ! You'd have me to fight, 
right now ! — Puck. 



IN THE COAST RANGE. 



A. \Y. BITTING. 



One day in the latter part of August, 
1897, found me on board a Santa Fe train 
en route to join a friend in camp in the 
mountains of Southwestern Oregon, 40 
miles from the coast. After leaving New 
Mexico the trip through Arizona and Cali- 
fornia was new to me. Occasionally I 
caught sight of small game from the car 
windows and the ever changing aspect of 
the country was of great interest. All too 
soon I reached Grant's Pass, Oregon, 
where I was cordially greeted by my friend 
A. Early next morning we set out, each 
mounted on a tough mountain pony, fol- 
lowed by 3 large burros carrying our 
camp outfit. We crossed beautiful Rogue 
river, a rushing mountain stream stocked 
with salmon and trout and said to hold in 
the crevices of the rocky bottom much 
glittering gold. Entering the foothills of 
the range, we followed the stage road 20 
of the 50 miles to camp. Our way wound 
in and out of beautiful groves of tall pines, 
spruce and other evergreens, madrone, 
pepper, hazel and many varieties of trees 
and shrubs unfamiliar to me. Salmon, 
sarvis, red, black and blue huckleberries and 
other wild fruit were met with all along 
the way, and there was abundance of wild 
oats and grass for the horses. Large 
grey squirrels pretended to be scared at 
our intrusion and hurriedly scampered up 
the trees, and the tamer and more plenti- 
ful pine squirrels scolded us from the 
limbs of trees overhanging the road above 
us. While squirrels have furnished sport 
for innumerable hunters and filled many 
a camp kettle in time past, they are free 
from danger as far as I am concerned. 
Other game animals and birds may be just 
as innocent and deserving of protection, 
but I have the strongest attachment for 
squirrels and have ceased to find pleasure 
in destroying them. 

By noon we came to a large branch of 
Rogue river, then at a low stas-e of water. 
While A. selected a restine place and cared 
for the animals, I adjusted my Bristol rod 
and took a stroll down the stream. Com- 
ing to a likely pool I dropped a brown 
hackle over its foaming surface and it had 
hardly touched the water when it was 
taken with a rush. I was out of practice 
and taken by surprise. I came near losing 
my first Coast range trout ; but with the 
sweet singing of the reel, my old time 
skill came back. After a few wild lunges 
and struggles for freedom a one pound 
fighter came to land. Several smaller ones 
followed, out of the same pool, and al- 
though the sport was most alluring, I had 



enough for our dinner and rolled up my 
line. We soon had them in the pan, siz- 
zling over a fire of pine cones. 

To fry trout or any small fish properly, 
rub salt on the inside, roll in corn meal, or 
cracker dust, put in plenty of lard or equiva- 
lent and fry slowly over a slow fire. They 
will not burn then. The idea advanced 
by young campers that when cooked in 
much fat the fish absorb it and become 
greasy is incorrect. 

The markings on these trout and on all 
I caught afterward in the streams of the 
Coast range consisted of dark, grayish, 
block like figures, instead of the bright red 
spots I had been so familiar with in New 
Mexico and Pennsylvania. The Coast 
range trout are gamy and in streams where 
not plentiful and that have been fished over 
they are very wild. 

After a delicious dinner of trout, huckle- 
berries and sugar, with condensed milk, 
thanks to the individual who first thought 
ot condensing milk, we resumed our trip. 
The road gradually lead higher into the 
range. Huge rocks, covered with luxuriant 
mosses, ferns, vines and flowers, lined the 
road. Small streams of crystal water 
rushed headlong down the mountain sides, 
forming sparkling cascades in their course; 
and the banks were lined with flowering 
shrubbery and ferns of many kinds and 
sizes. Water ousels disported themselves 
in the spray under overhanging boulders 
and fallen trees, while humming birds and 
wild bees sucked sweets from the innumer- 
able flowers. The scenery was so enchant- 
ing that it was with the greatest reluctance 
we could move along. 

Toward evening we reached the town 
site of Selma. I say site, because there 
was more site than town. The latter con- 
sisted of one house, comprising postoffice, 
store and general information bureau for 
the neighborhood. The trail to camp there 
diverged from the stage road and a mile 
farther brought us to Mr. T's, where we 
out up for the night. The supper and 
breakfast set before us by Mrs. T. were 
most excellent. 

Next morning we hit the trail early, 
following Deer creek to its junction with 
the Illinois river, and then down the valley 
of the latter stream. Not much valley 
along these mountain streams, as the moun- 
tains generally come down precipitously, 
close to the water's edge, and in following 
the streams, long detours are often neces- 
sary. These are the roughest and most 
tumbled of mountain ranges I ever saw. 
Deer, cougar aricl wildcat tracks were fre- 



93 



94 



RECREATION. 



quent and plainly impressed in the dust on 
the trail, and we kept our eyes open for 
possible sight of the owners, but nothing 
larger than chipmunks or squirrels came 
to view. There are some bears in these 
mountains, but I did not see any. Occasion- 
ally the whir of a blue grouse or a pheas- 
ant broke the stillness of this quiet region. 
One of the former came to my gun and 
made part of our noonday meal. 

Early in the evening we reached the 
crossing point of the Illinois river, the main 
branch of Rogue river, deep and shallow 
at intervals. The bed and banks are solid 
rock, worn smooth as glass and honey- 
combed in places. Huge rocks, solitary and 
in groups, loom along the banks of the 
river at frequent intervals. On the tops of 
many of these I often found well-like 
holes, containing several barrels of water. 
On others pine, spruce, shrubbery and 
vines were growing, making scenery grand- 
ly picturesque. This part of the country is 
seldom reached by tourists. A few pros- 
pectors and miners are its only visitors. 

My friend gave a loud "hello," which 
brought from his cottage "Old George," 
who crossed the river in his boat. We 
loaded our traps into it and rowed to the 
other shore, holding one of the horses with 
a lariat, the other animals following the 
leader. I found George quite a char- 
acter, and a "mine of information" regard- 
ing the vicinity. He had been miner, 
rancher, hunter and gardener, having lived 
in that location several decades. In that 
time he had reclaimed several acres of 
ground from boulders and timber, making 
himself a fine garden and orchard. By 
diverting water from a stream near, he 
was always sure of raising vegetables and 
fruit, thus creating a little paradise of a 
garden in this otherwise wild region. He 
invited us to spend the night with him 
and he sat before us a most excellent sup- 
per of deer's liver, biscuits, wild honey, 
fruit, etc. His log cabin was roomy and a 
model of neatness and good housekeeping. 
Several shelves were stocked with well 
thumbed editions of English and German 
standard authors, while late periodicals and 
papers covered the table. Fur rugs were 
on the floor and numerous antlers adorned 
the walls, serving as racks for guns, spears 
and other implements of the chase. George 
gave us a history of his eventful life in 
these mountains and I became a willing 
listener to his truthful tales of adventure 
with bears, cougars, and other animals of 
the vicinity. His most exciting and danger- 
ous scraps, however, had been with Mexi- 
can and other outlaws. 

The next morning we reached A's camp. 
Carl V., a bright young German, A's mining 
partner, and "Soon«r," his hunting dog, 
were the sole occupants. The camp was 



on a bench on the side of one of the tall- 
est peaks, half a mile from Rancherer 
creek. Pine, spruce, and madrone trees 
were scattered singly and in groups and the 
ground was covered with short grass, thus 
giving the place a park-like appearance. A 
strong spring of ice-cold water gushed from 
among the rocks. The stream leading 
from the spring was lined with wild honey- 
suckle and numerous other fragrant flow- 
ering plants and the air was delicious with 
their perfume and the exhalations from 
evergreen. There was a large flat rock 
on the top of the peak high above us, and 
during my visit I spent many a pleasant 
hour there watching, with a strong field 
glass, the sails of vessels on the Pacific. 
To the East and Northeast the snow-capped 
peaks of the Cascades arose, while to the 
Southeast the Siskiyous and grand old 
Shasta loomed. In all directions were 
mountains, as far as the eye could see. 

My companions were quartered in a tent, 
and after I had set up mine I spent several 
days in making a bedstead, table, chairs, 
etc. When they were completed we had a 
model camp. I then made a visit to the 
mine and was so impressed with the finan- 
cial outlook that I arranged for an interest 
in the property, a quartz prospect on top 
of a high butte, half a mile from camp. 
A. and V. worked the mine, while Sooner 
and I took charge of the camp, keeping 
house and furnishing the table with choice 
venison, grouse, pheasants, wild ringneck 
pigeons and quails. Our board was varied 
by fruit from George's orchard, and wild 
fruit from the vicinity of camp, huckle- 
berries being especially plentiful and of fine 
flavor. They were most delicious with 
sugar and milk or made into pies and pud- 
dings. Salmon and trout were to be had 
for the taking. Being 50 miles from the 
nearest butcher shop we depended on deer 
for our fresh meat and I could always get 
a blacktail in a day's hunt. 

I never shot at deer unless we were in 
need of meat and I therefore had frequent 
opportunities of studying their habits. One 
morning while sitting under a large pine 
tree, watching the opposite mountain side 
for deer, I turned my head and not more 
than 15 feet from me stood an old doe, in- 
tently looking me over. She stood but a 
moment longer and one jump into the brush 
hid her from view. I can still see those 
large innocent eyes staring at me and I 
feel glad that I had no opportunity to 
shoot her. 

In the spring and fall salmon, though 
plentiful, would not take the fly or bait. 
When we wanted one we would either get 
it with a rifle or with a long pole with a 
hook fastened to the end. This may not 
have been sportsmanlike, but it required 
some skill. When standing on a slippery 



IN THE COAST RANGE. 



95 



rock, feeling around in a pool for a fish 
and when found and hooked fast to him 
it was often a question whether I would 
get the fish out or vice versa. The salmon 
weighed 5 to 30 pounds. Salmon trout 
would take grasshoppers, and mountain 
trout both hoppers and the fly, preferring 
the former. During June and July lamprey 
eels ascended the river to spawn and 
thousands of them could be seen clinging 
to the rocks and slowly working their way 
over the falls in the river. 

A quarter of a century ago this region 
was a busy mining camp, many of the 
creeks having been rich in placer gold; but 
they have been worked out and the mining 
now is confined mostly to quartz and cop- 
per mining, with some placering along the 
Illinois river. 

There were a few features of this camp 
life that were not pleasant. Poison oak, 
rattlesnakes, yellow jackets and innumer- 
able bugs and insects had no charms. Rat- 
tlers were plentiful, and while not seem- 
ingly vicious, were often too close to be 
agreeable. In going along the trail I fre- 
quently found them coiled up, and on 
several occasions I had to make a swift 
hop, skip and jump to clear them. With 
the poison oak I was less fortunate. I 
got a dose of that, causing me intense suf- 
'fering for more than a month. Applica- 
tions of carbolic acid and glycerine, as 
strong as the patient can stand it, are prob- 
ably as effective as any remedy. One 
should never go into that country without 
a supply, as well as whiskey for possible 
snake bites. Yellow jackets were so plenti- 
ful that at times it was almost impos 



siblc to eat a meal without some of 
them passing in, and there were fre- 
quent occasions on which one's early 
Sunday-school training came into requisi- 
tion. A piece of meat hung up would be 
eaten by yellow jackets in a short time. I 
killed a large rattlesnake and laid it on a 
log, intending to take a camera shot at it 
later; but a few hours afterward there re- 
mained only the skeleton. 

As the time of my friends was constant- 
ly required at the mine, Sooner and I made 
frequent jaunts into the surrounding moun- 
tains, often going long distances, and fre- 
quently passing the night in some deserted 
cabin or rolled up in a blanket under a 
pine or spruce. I always felt safe from 
prowling "varmints," as my faithful dog 
was ever on the alert. 

I spent the greater part of a year in this 
camp and after bidding my friends a reluc- 
tant adieu, I took the stage at Selma for 
Crescent City, California. The route was 
through pine and redwood forests, rhodo- 
dendron patches and mountain scenery of 
surpassing loveliness. I stopped several 
days at Smith's river, a large stream full 
of gamy trout. There I cast my last fly. 
I found the fish, being nearer the coast, 
larger and gamier than any I had pre- 
viously taken. 

From Crescent City to Frisco I spent 
most of the time on the deck of the little 
steamer, watching the blowings of the 
numerous whales and the skimming hither 
and thither of the gulls, ducks, snipe, etc. 
I know of no part of the country where a 
summer or winter can be spent more agree- 
ably than in the coast mountains of Oregon. 





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AMATEUR PHOTO BY N. PC'MEROY JR. 

HOME OF THE WHITE FACED HORNET. 
Cirru inference 3 feet 7 inches, one w^y; 4 feet 4 inches the other 



THE BIRD OF SOLITUDE. 



EDWIN I. HAINES. 



On the summit of Bald Top mountain, 
of the Catskill range, one evening in July, 
1895, 1 became acquainted with the grey 
cheeked thrush. 1 had been collecting 
specimens all day on this peak, and as the 
sun was setting I began descending the 
mountain. Presently from far above me, 
somewhere in the heart of the balsam for- 
ests, I heard the rich organ-like notes of 
"a bird in the solitude singing." I stopped 
and listened, for the song was unfamiliar, 
and for a wild bird's song, one of the most 
beautiful I had ever heard. It was the 
song of some species of thrush, I knew, 
but the singer was not a wood, Wilson's, 
olive backed or hermit. Those songs I 
was familiar with. What one, then, could 
it be? This question I settled next day, 
for by patient waiting I at last secured one 
of these beautiful songsters, and when I 
reached home in the fall it was identified 
as the grey cheeked thrush. 

The 2 succeeding summers I made care- 
ful search of other mountain peaks in Dela- 
ware county for evidence of this bird, but 
obtained none. It was not until I visited 
Slide mountain that I again met with it. 
While collecting there on the 10th of June, 
1898, I shot a thrush which I supposed was 
an olive backed, but on close examination 
I found it was a grey cheeked. Wishing 
to make a careful study of this little known 
species, I visited the Slide again on the 
12th and camped on its summit until the 
18th. During that time I had ample op- 
portunity to study the bird's habits and 
listen to its song. 

Slide mountain stands at the head of Big 
Indian valley in the heart of the Catskills 
of Ulster county, and rises 4,220 feet above 
sea level. It is a lonely, desolate peak, 
surrounded by broad, open valleys. Its 
rocky summit is covered by a sparse growth 
of stunted pines and balsams, but its bird 
and animal life, being strictly Northern, are 
specially interesting. Grey cheeked thrushes 
are common on this mountain, but are so 
shy it is difficult to get near them. You 
can never get to them, but if you are pa- 
tient they will sometimes come to you. 
Often I have crept on hands and knees 
toward the tree whence the song came, but 



when I reached it, the song would come 
from somewhere else. All my toil had 
been in vain. During my entire stay on 
the mountain I obtained but 4 specimens. 
To get these I sat hours in one spot, 
cramped, half broiled by the sun, and nearly 
eaten alive by black gnats and other pests 
that swarmed there. This bird, hitherto 
the only member of tne thrush family sup- 
posed to summer beyond the limits of the 
United States, has only been found in sum- 
mer on the 2 peaks mentioned, Bald Top 
mountain, 3,800 feet high, Delaware county, 
N. Y., and Slide mountain, 4,220 feet high, 
Ulster county, N. Y. These 2 mountains 
are similarly situated but lie over 50 miles 
apart. These 2 places must afford condi- 
tions more favorable as summer homes for 
this thrush than other places. 

Every kind of bird seems to voice some 
phase of nature. The bobolink sings for 
the sunny meadow, the oriole for the shady 
treetop, the bluebird for the blue sky, the 
towhee for the blackberry brambles, the 
winter wren for the roaring brooks. The 
grey cheeked thrush sings for the lonely 
mountain peaks, and chants his Te Deums 
for sunrise and sunset. Our camp on the 
mountain summit was often serenaded by 
this beautiful songster, sometimes at the 
break of day, but oftenest at dusk. The 
last evening on the mountain, while my 
assistant was cooking supper, and packing 
up for the morrow's departure, I strolled 
toward Lookout rock, to see the sunset and 
listen to the grev-cheek's vespers. As I 
went along, watching the red light slant- 
ing across the neighboring mountains, and 
the dark shadows creeping up from the 
valleys, I was thrilled with his song, but 
not till I had reached the rock overlooking 
the valley, and the dark line of wooded 
mountains beyond, not till the summer sun 
dropped behind the dark peaks, and the 
rosy afterglow of the sunset was turning 
to pale serene light, did the song of the 
grey-cheek most deeply stir me with its 
richness and beauty. Then from the dense 
balsam thickets it came to me, filling the 
cool evening air with its tremulous, pathetic 
yearning, gathering up into short waves of 
song the silent music of the sunset — God's 
message of peace. 



"Papa, what is a marriage in high life?" 
"Two vacant hearts entirely surrounded 
by cash." — Life. 



97 



BILLS AND FEET OF BIRDS. 



GEO. C. EMBODY. 




© 



Bill of the Hawk. 



Why is the bill of a hawk hooked? Why 
is the foot of a duck webbed? Is it be- 
cause the foot of a duck is webbed that it 
swims about in search of food; or is it 
because the bird swims about that its foot 
is webbed? The latter is the likely case, 
for the former is antagonistic to the theory 
presented by Darwin. Again, the Galli- 
nules of certain islands in Southern seas 
can not fly. In those islands, where food 
is abundant and no enemy is known, the 
ducks have no further use for their wings ; 
and in the course of many centuries, 
through disuse the wings have become so 
small that the power of flight is lost. 

The external features of the hawk (figs. 
1-2), present admirable examples of 
adaptation. He is ever on 
the alert for some un- 
suspecting field mouse, 
squirrel, frog, chicken or 
even snake. This prey 
must first be sighted 
from a distance, so we 
find hawks possessing eyes far superior 
to those of other creatures. The feet have 
large, not too long, toes, 4 in number, 
which support long, sharp, powerful claws 
for holding the struggling victim after the 
well aimed dash has 
been made. One blow 
from the huge hooked 
bill makes the suffer- 
er forever insensible 
to pain. The hooked 
bill was made for an- 
other purpose also. 
Since the hawk's food 
consists largely of 
small rodents which 
can not be swallowed 
whole, it is necessary 
that he possess an 
instrument for tearing and pulling away 
the fur and flesh. To be sure, the bird is 
generally too hungry to separate the fur 
from the meat and thus swallows both with 
apparently the same relish, the fur being 
afterward cast out. What instruments could 
be more economical than the 
powerful clawed foot for strik- 
ing and grasping and the hooked 
bill for tearing? 

The sharp, chisel-shaped bill is 
an instrument made purposely^ 
for the use of the woodpecker in cutting 
his home out of a partially decayed tree 
and digging out the vermin which 
infest the trees (fig. 4). The bird goes 
at his task in a business-like way. ham- 
mering first on one side and then on 




2. Foot of the Hawk. 



(r 



3. Bill of 
the Owl 




the other, causing the chips to fly in 
every direction. When the insect is 
reached the sharply pointed, barbed tongue, 
backed by a pair of well developed muscles, 
which encircle the 
skull, darts out, 
impaling the un- 
fortunate insect. 
The 4 toes (fig. 5) 
2 in front and 2 
behind, are well 
placed for clinging *■ Bin of the Woodpecker. 
to the bark, be it smooth or rough; and 
the stiff, pointed feathers of the tail serve 
as a brace for the heavy blows which are 
dealt, and prevent the bird from falling 
backward when resting. 

The nighthawk and the hummingbird se- 
cure their food in a different way, the former 
catching insects with 
wide open mouth while 
' continually on the 
wing, 1 he latter sus- 

5. Foot of Woodpecker, pendedon wings before 
a flower, picking out 
the minute flies and ants which are at- 
tracted by the nectar and occasionally 
helping himself to the sweet liquid. In 
the nighthawk we find a short bill at the 
extremity of a 
mouth (fig. 7) so 
wide that no in- 
sect could hope to 
escape, while many 
might be taken at 
one time. Very dif- 
ferent is the bill of 6 Bill of the F i ycatc her. 
the hummingbird 

(fig. 8). Long and slender, it will reach 
an insect at the extreme end of the largest 

and longest blossom. This long, slender 









7. Bill of the Nighthawk. 

bill has still another use, that of feeding 
the young. Most young birds could be 
fed with short bills as well as with long 
ones, but not so with young 
hummingbirds. The food 
must be regurgitated, dur- 
8. Bill of the j n g which operation the bill 
Hummingbird. of the parent must be 

thrust far down the little one's throat, 
where it remains 4 or 5 seconds without 
causing the least unpleasantness to the 
young bird, These 2 species have no spe- 



BILLS AND FEET OF HINDS. 



99 




rial use for large, strong, well-developed 
feet, with sharp nails, so we find them 
possessing mere apologies for feet, which 
are barely able to support the weight of 
the body while the individual is resting 
(fig. 9). Instead of sitting up straight 
with legs extended, both species sit with 
their bodies close to, if ^psxr-^. 

not actually resting on the /a jd;&^ J ^-* 
limb, the nighthawk al- fin**' 
ways lengthwise. _ () Foot of the 

Everyone is acquainted Nighthawk. 
with a few species of the 
family Fringillid<r, sparrows, finches, gros- 
beaks, etc. The same general type of bill 
exists in every species of this, the largest 
family of birds, namely, the short, stubby 
bill, operated by well-developed muscles 
and capable of comparatively great crushing 
power for cracking seeds and other hard sub- 
stances (figs. 10,11,12). In autumn spar- 
rows and finches feed almost 
O £^ exclusively on the seeds of 
obnoxious weeds along fences 
and in the fields. As a rule 
10 Bill of the the nutritious material is cov- 
Spar?ow g ered by a shell varying in 
hardness. A few species of 
other families, as the horned larks, black- 
birds and meadow larks, eat the seeds 
without cracking them. They have longer 
bills, which are better adapted for other 
purposes ; but the sparrow must crack his 
seed and eat only the choicest morsel with- 
in. Thus he possesses the short, stout bill 
most useful to his manner of eating. As we 
look from sparrows to finches 
and from finches to gros- 
beaks we find this type much 
exaggerated, reaching its cul- 
minating point in the grosbeaks, 
where it is nearly as thick at 
its base as is the skull. Gros- 
beaks are often seen crushing 
frozen buds in winter, to get 
worm or larva form within, 
times they may be seen among the 
conifers extracting the hard seeds from 
the cones. Our resident grosbeaks dur- 
ing spring and summer seem to prefer 
certain hard-shelled beetles for a diet. 
In all of these cases the short, stout, 
hard bill renders valuable 
service. In one species of 
this family, the crossbill, 
we find a special form of 
bill. This irregular wan- 
derer, disobeying all rules 

J n B i 11 T? f ^ he of migration, whose reap- 
Purple Finch. & ' . 1 x 

pearance can not be tore- 
told by the most learned philosophic orni- 
thologists, possesses a bill admirably adapt- 
ed for extracting saeds from the cones ol the 
pine. (fig. 13.) In late winter when the 
food supply of the birds has been consid- 
erablv diminished, it is not a rare sight 




ir. Bill of 
the Gros- 
beak. 

at some 
At other 



<§> 




13 Bill of 
the Cross- 
bill. 



m certain localities to behold the Ameri- 
can and white winged crossbills shearing 
off the ice-coated buds of the maple and 
elm trees, perhaps in search of small 
worms, since the most tender parts of the 
buds are strewn about on the 
snow beneath. 

As a rule the bills of birds 
which search damp meadows, 
lawns and sometimes swamps 
for worms, are longer than 
those of the seed eaters, for a 
certain amount of probing must be 
done before the food is secured. They 
must also do much scratching to un- 
cover certain choice bits. For this rea- 
son nature has provided for them strong 
legs and feet with rather long, sharp 
claws. (Fig. 14.) This type is character- 
istic also of the perching birds (order 
Passeres), which 
spend the greater 
part of their exist- 
ence among shrubs 
and trees. 

A highly special- 
ized form of bill 
(Fig. 15), is pos- 
sessed by the Am- 
erican woodcock 
( Philohela minor) and 
Wils on's snipe 

(Gallinago delicata), the former inhabiting 
swamps and alder thickets, the latter, damp 
meadows. The bill of the woodcock is 
slender and nearly 3 inches long. That of 
Wilson's snipe is about x / 2 inch shorter. 
The structure of the bill is peculiar in that 
it is flexible and that the tip of its upper 




14- 



Characteristic foot of 
the Passeres. 




15. Bill of the Woodcock. 

mandible can be moved independently of 
the lower one, enabling it to act as a finger 
and thus assist the bird in drawing its food 
from the ground. 

Another highly specialized form of bill 
is that of the 
skimmer. On 
the Atlantic 
coast this fam- 
ily is represent- 
ed by but one 
species, inhabiting the warmer regions. 
The skimmers ,are unique in their manner 
of feeding as well as in the form of their 
bills, In shape the bill is similar to a long 




16. Bill of the Skimmer. 



100 



RECREATION. 



blade, the lower mandible being much is dropped just beneath the surface of the 

longer than the upper (fig. 16). Of their water; then, flying rapidly, they may be 

manner of feeding one writer says, "Open- said literally to ' plow the main' in search 

ing the mouth, the bladelike lower mandible of small aquatic animals." 



LONGING FOR THE COUNTRY. 



C. M. DENISON. 



As the city streets grow hotter, and the 

sun comes beating down, 
And the rich and idle fellows have about 

all left the town, 
It just seems to me I'd like to hie myself 

to some cool spot, 
Where the business cares and worries of 

this life could be forgot; 
There to rest this poor old body, just to 

loaf among the trees, 
A-listening to the brook's soft tune, and 

the humming of the bees ; 
Just to live in some old farm-house, where 

they build the porches wide, 
And the fragrant, dewy roses are a-bloom- 

ing just outside; 



Where there's miles of pleasant landscape 

built to please the weary eye 
And a daisy of a trout brook ripples 

through the meadow nigh; 
Where there's nothing special doing, and 

you nap beneath the trees, 
Just a-listening to the music made by 

every passing breeze; 
Where you go to bed at evening, and you 

sleep the whole night long, 
And you wake up in the morning, feeling 

mighty good and strong; 
And you eat till nearly busted, bread and 

butter, pies, and cake, 
'Cause the victuals taste so nearly like 

those mother used to make. 



/ m¥ 

1 1 x_ my 

' "\. ' Vj gEMi -7. \ /*H 




f* t r •§' \ x 


L — m| 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY A, C. DICKINSON. 

TRYING TO LOOK PLEASANT, 



THE DEPARTURE OE THE BIRDS. 



K. R. NICHOLSON. 



Much has been written about the ar- 
rival of the birds in spring, but little of 
their departure in fall. This is but natural, 
for their joyous return from the South is 
far more interesting and significant than 
their departure in the autumn. 

In Southwestern Ontario the nesting sea- 
son of most birds is over by the time the 
hot weather begins. Many then go farther 
North, while others resort to the neighbor- 
hood of the lakes and rivers, where food 
is abundant. There they remain till moult- 
ing is over, and they have gained new, 
strong feathers for their long Southward 
flight. 

Nearly all birds wear their most attract- 
ive plumage in spring, for the wooing and 
winning of their mates. They are con- 
spicuous at that season because the trees 
do not yet have leaves to conceal the birds 
as they flit among the branches. By 
autumn the males have shed their brilliant 
nuptial feathers, have assumed modest trav- 
eling dresses of sober colors, and often male 
and female, old and young, are scarcely dis- 
tinguishable. A few birds, however, such 
as the mallard and the bittern, always wear 
their richest and brightest colors in the 
fall. The male mallard moults while his 
mate is engaged in incubation, and by Oc- 
tober he is clothed in all his splendor. 

Moulting is a trying ordeal, which most 
of our birds undergo during the summer 
or autumn. A complete moult, which in- 
cludes the shedding of the large quill 
feathers, takes place only once a year, but 
some species, like the ptarmigan, undergo 
a partial moult twice, and even thrice in 
12 months. In spring the ptarmigan sports 
a variegated plumage of black, brown and 
white, but when nesting is over it changes 
its wedding apparel for a quiet suit of grey. 
When winter approaches, it comes forth 
arrayed in pure white, with feather snow- 
shoes. 

Some birds change color and appear to 
have moulted, without shedding a feather. 
This is due in some species to the trans- 
formation of the pigment of the feathers. 
The plumage of the redpolls does not ac- 
tually change color, but in the spring the 
wide grey margins of the crown and breast 
feathers break off and reveal the glowing 
crimson, concealed before. 

The moulting season varies in length, 
depending on the species. Ducks and geese 
are said to require but 4 weeks, while our 
song birds are slower. Birds of prey take 
the whole year to shed their quil feathers. 
As a rule, the large wing feathers are shed 
in pairs, one at a time from each wing, and 



thus the flight of the bird is not impaired. 
Water fowl drop all the quill feathers 
at one time and the birds, as far as flight 
is concerned, become entirely helpless. 
When moulting begins, however, they are 
always careful not to wander far from the 
neighborhood of water, in order that when 
danger approaches they may flee by swim- 
ming. 

In the fall, birds are generally silent save 
for their call notes. Sometimes, however, 
in autumn a lonely bachelor croons a half- 
forgotten love song, or perhaps some young 
males indulge in tentative warbles. Only 
the other morning I was delighted to hear, 
in the heart of the city, a little house wren 
singing in a low, far-away voice, as it 
threaded its way through the woodpile ; 
while in a neighboring garden some migrant 
white-throats were whistling in sweet, 
though defective numbers. Often rare vis- 
itors from distant Northlands abide in the 
garden a few days to rest, before, resuming 
their Southern pilgrimage, but few are 
aware of their presence. 

Herr Gatke, who for over 50 years 
studied the flight of birds on the island of 
Heligoland, has cast much light on the sub- 
ject of their migrations. It was long be- 
lieved that the old and experienced birds 
guided the young on their journey to the 
South at the approach of winter, but Herr 
Gatke was the first to call attention to the 
fact that the young birds are the first to 
leave in the autumn, the old birds following 
some weeks later. The youn. , birds, how- 
ever, are generally preceded by mateless 
males. These old bachelors, distinguished 
by their nuptial plumage, which, though 
faded and worn, they still retained, Herr 
Gatke found were the first to hasten South. 
In spring the order of the return of the 
birds is the reverse of the order of their 
departure in the fall. . First come the old 
males in their finest plumage, then old fe- 
males, followed by more females and 
young of both sexes, then young alone, 
cripples last. 

The distances traveled by migrating birds 
vary from a few hundred miles to about 
7,000. Most of our Canadian birds spend 
the winter in Mexico and the Gulf States, 
though a great many, such as sparrows, rob- 
ins and meadow larks, remain in the coun- 
try from Ohio to Louisiana. The cedar 
swamps of the Alleghany mountains, espe- 
cially, are favorite resorts for the robins. 
The turnstone is a great traveler, nesting in 
Greenland and wintering in South Amer- 
ica. The golden plover, likewise, nests in 
the Barren Lands above the Arctic Circle 



102 



RECREATION. 



and passes the winter in the West Indies. 
European birds migrate to Africa, the 
English swallows going to Natal. 

Though most birds migrate from North 
to South, in certain countries they go from 
East to West. Richard's pipit nests on the 
steppes of Eastern Asia, but winters in 
France and Spain. The Royston crows, 
which breed in Siberia, travel in winter as 
far West as England, while the little bunt- 
ing nests in the far East of Russia and 
spends the winter in France. 

The first birds to depart in the fall are 
those whose means of sustenance are first 
cut off. Swallows live on insects, which 
they catch on the wing, consequently when 
harvest is over, evenings are cool and in- 
sects fewer, the swallows begin to think of 
their winter homes and toward the end of 
August take their flight. 

One would expect the family of flycatch- 
ers to leave about the same time as the 
swallows, but they do not go till a few 
weeks later, for, when their supply of in- 
sects is exhausted, they turn to berries and 
other small fruits which they eat with 
relish. There are 5 common species in On- 
tario, the kingbird, wood pewee, phoebe, 
least and great-crested flycatchers. All 
are orchard birds. They leave for the 
South about the middle of September, the 
great-crested flycatchers going as far as 
Mexico. 

The red-eyed vireo, having faithfully ful- 
filled its long ministry of song, departs for 
the Gulf States early in September, just 
when the Baltimore oriole visits the orchard 
on its way to the South. The bobo- 
link leaves also in September. He is one of 
our most charming birds, coming from the 
balmy South early in May and flooding the 



meadows with his jingling notes. There 
is an ineffable charm in his festive man- 
ner, his fantastic dress, and his joyous 
song. He is the favorite of the poets. In 
autumn the males change their handsome 
summer clothes for modest traveling suits 
of yellowish brown, and on a calm evening 
they set out for the Southern rice fields, 
where they revel in gluttony during the 
winter. There they are known as reed' 
birds or rice birds. They become very fat 
and, sad to say, are shot in large numbers 
as game. 

About the middle of September that 
winged gem, the ruby-throated humming 
bird, starts for Central America, and is 
soon followed by all the warblers. How 
wonderful is the endurance that enables 
these little birds to sustain such long jour- 
neys in spring and fall. Late in September 
thrushes, catbirds, wrens, red-headed wood- 
peckers, flickers and mourning doves leave 
their summer haunts and migrate to their 
winter quarters. As October approaches, the 
vesper and song sparrows bid adieu. It is 
pathetic to hear a lone song sparrow striving 
then to sing. Its voice cracks when it 
reaches the trill of its song. As the month 
advances great flocks of bronze grackles, 
red-wingred and rusty blackbirds and cow- 
birds darken the sky on their Southward 
flight. Flocks of wild geese and ducks 
then fly South and often the "honk, honk" 
of the wise old gander can be heard at 
night as he leads his wedge-shaped flocks 
through the sky. The last birds to leave 
are the robins, purple finches, bluebirds, 
meadow larks and goldfinches, though of- 
'ten many of the larks and finches remain 
during the winter. 



A little Cambridge girl was discovered 
whispering in school, and the teacher 
asked : 

"What were you saying to the girl next 
to you when I caught you whispering?" 

The little culprit hung her head, and 
then replied : 

"I was only telling her how nice you 
looked in your new dress." 

"Well, that — yes — I know — but we must 
— the class in spelling will please stand up." 
—Christian Register. 



WITH THE SHORE BIRDS. 



C. O. ZERRALIN. 



One morning near the end of August 
my friend R. and I started for the beach. 
A gentle Southwest wind was blowing and 
we felt assured that sport would not be 
lacking. After a brisk walk of about a 
mile and a half over the cool sand in the 
glorious early morning air, we reached our 
box. The decoys were soon set out, and 
then we sat watching the red sun rise over 
the dashing surf. 

Suddenly we were brought to life again 
by a plaintive "phee-in-wee." 

"Beetle heads," whispered R. and we an- 
swered in seductive tones. Down the beach 
they came, 4 blackbreasts, straight for 
our decoys. "Crack, crack, crack, bang !" 
and 3 plovers lay on the sand. 

It was not long until a pretty bunch of 
redbreasts visited us, and departed minus 
5 of their number. The flight had really 
commenced, and large bunches of peep 
were circling up and down the beach. Now 
and then we heard shots down the flats, 
but we had the first crack at the birds, 
thanks to the wind and our lucky draw of 
box number one. 

We had scarcely retrieved the redbreasts, 
when a pair of winter yellowlegs came in. 
Much to my disgust I missed with my first 
barrel, but scored with my left. R. nailed 
his bird, and our bag was beginning to 
look formidable. Then came a lull, but 
not for long. We heard the inimitable 
whistle of a big willet. He came in most 
unsuspiciously and a minute later he lay 
under a covering of cool seaweed, with 
his unfortunate cousins. 

A pair of gaudy "chickens," or turn- 
stones, then gave me a chance to get the 
laugh on R. He missed his bird with 



both barrels and I nearly gave him heart 
failure, and myself also, by making a neat 
double. He, however, made up by killing 
4 stilt out of 6, while I was cursing over 
a swelled shell in the breech of my gun. 
The stilt, by the way, used to be rare in 
Massachusetts, but during the last year 
they have been shot in large numbers. The 
afternoon before, 3 of us knocked 18 out 
of one flock. 

Suddenly R. pointed up the beach, and 
we saw a large flock of summer yellowlegs 
heading for our decoys. We poured 4 
charges into the well bunched birds, and 
gathered up 9 of the fat little waders. 

The tide was then high, so we had to 
pull up the decoys and wait for the ebb. 
it was growing hot and we stripped to our 
rowing shirts, and took a nap. We were 
awaked by the mellow "phew-phew-phew" 
of a winter yellowleg, and to our dis- 
gust found that the tide was al- 
ready well on the ebb. Decoys were out 
in a jiffy, and we commenced to whistle 
for the lonely winter. At last he suc- 
cumbed to our entreaties and gave me an 
exquisite chance to miss him with both 
barrels. I redeemed myself by doubling a 
pair of beetleheads a moment later. 

As it was growing dusk and the flight 
had nearly ceased, and as a certain gnawing 
feeling in our stomachs was increasing, 
we gathered up our bag, and started home. 

"I'll bet this is the best bag to-day," said 
R., when he handed the birds over to me, 
having carried them half the way. He 
was right for with the pair of grass birds 
we got on the way home our 30 big birds 
were as many as all the other shooters to- 
gether had taken. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY C. C, SPEIGHT. 

PHOEBZ BIRD. 

103 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY L. D. LINDSLEY- 



PROBABLY YOUNG MEXICAN WOOD RAT. NEOTOMA MEXICAN A. 
Made with Premo Camera 




SCOLDING. 

Made with Korona Camera. 
104 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY W. R. SMITH. 



■"■ 



BIRDS AT BAILEY'S. 



L. S. KEYSER. 



Bailey's is one of the many summer re- 
sorts in the South Platte canyon, Colorado, 
and may be reached by a railway journey of 
55 miles from Denver. Nestled in an open 
valley, the village is one of the pleasantest 
places in the Rocky mountains. I was 
pleased to find this valley the summer 
home of many birds, as well as an attrac- 
tive resort for human pleasure seekers. 

In the Rockies you must not expect to 
find many of the birds common in the East. 
While following a ravine that led from the 
village up into the mountains, my ear was 
greeted by a song that sounded familiar, 
but that I felt sure must come from the 
throat of a bird that was new to me. So 
it proved, for my field glass soon brought 
into view a gorgeously clad bird, whose 
back, wings and tail were black ; head, scar- 
let or crimson, the same color running 
down over the chest in diluted tints; rest 
of plumage, bright yellow, gleaming almost 
like amber in the sunshine. 

Observers in the East are familiar with 
a little bird whose suit of scarlet, trimmed 
with black wings and tail, make him a 
conspicuous object in the woods; also with 
another beautiful bird which wears a suit 
of rosy red or vermilion throughout. 
These are the scarlet and summer tanagers. 
You will not find them in Colorado, but in 
their stead you will make acquaintance 
with the brilliant bird just described. He 
is called the Louisiana tanager, and for 
beauty of plumage has few, if any, rivals 
in the Rocky mountains. 

However, his song, as far as I am able 
to judge, is just like those of his Eastern 
kinsmen, a kind of drawling tune that is 
pleasing enough, but can not be called bril- 
liant. Although I had been rambling sev- 
eral weeks up and down the mountains 
from the foothills to the crests of some of 
the highest peaks, I saw my first Louisiana 
tanagers at Bailey's. At daybreak my 
half-waking dreams were pleasantly broken 
by the matins of this bird, proving him an 
early riser. He is as fond of a pine forest 
on the mountain side as his Eastern rela- 
tives are of a woodland of oak in their 
own longitude. His mate, who is not so 
brilliantly clad as her lord, saddles her 
nest on the horizontal branch of a pine 
tree, usually some distance out toward the 
end. Lovers of the mountains, these birds 
rear their broods between 7.000 and 10,000 
feet above sea level, avoiding the plains 
during the breeding season, although seen 
there frequently in the periods of migra- 
tion. 

Another interesting bird seen in the hol- 



low above Bailey's was the pygmy nut- 
hatch, which you will not find in the East- 
ern or Middle States, where you know only 
the white breasted nuthatch as a resident 
and the red breasted nuthatch as a mi- 
grant. Three or 4 of these pygmies were 
flitting about among the pines, clambering 
up and down the branches and boles in true 
nuthatch fashion, now head upward and 
now the reverse. They seem shy and nerv- 
ous little creatures, always moving about 
among the twigs or glancing from tree to 
tree, so that they were difficult to watch 
with the field glass. All their movements 
were accompanied by a half musical little 
chirping, which was sometimes prolonged 
almost into a song when the birds became 
especially excited over my presence, as they 
did when I followed them about and ogled 
them with my glass. As their name sig- 
nifies, the pygmies are tiny birds, scarcely 
more than half as large as the white 
breasted nuthatches, and spend the breed- 
ing season exclusively among the moun- 
tains, ranging 5,000 to 10,000 feet above 
sea level. 

Among the Rockies you look in vain for 
the common blue jay, but in its stead you 
find the long crested jay, so called because 
of the long, black crest that adorns his 
shapely head. He is rather a handsome 
fellow, with his coat of navy blue. He was 
met with almost everywhere among the 
mountains from the foothills to timber 
line, and is especially fond of the steep 
and bushy acclivities, the pine forests, and 
the bushy valleys, where he hides his nest 
in such a manner that, though large, it is 
extremely difficult to find. 

In the ravine, of which mention has been 
made, there was a family of these birds, 
the parents feeding their young, which a 
week before had grown too large to remain 
in the nest. A great variety of sounds 
came from the throats of the adult birds. 
They uttered a harsh, . grating call which 
seemed meant as a warning to the young- 
sters to be on their guard. When I pur- 
sued them, one of the birds, perhaps the 
male, played a little tune on his trombone, 
which might be represented as follows : 
"Ka-ka-ka, k-wuit, k-wuit, k-wuit," the 
syllable "ka" repeated rapidly, while the 
"k-wuit" was pronounced more deliberate- 
ly, with a kind of guttural and gurgling 
intonation. This song, if song it may be 
called, bears some resemblance to the com- 
mon blue jay's liquid outburst. It was 
succeeded by a grating call that sounded 
like a file drawn over the edge of sheet- 
iron. Then the birds chattered in a low, 



105 



io6 



RECREATION. 



affectionate way that seemed to indicate 
they were having' a little conference just 
among themselves. 

As I still pursued them, one of the old 
birds cried "Quick! quick! quick!" as 
fast as he could fling the syllable from his 
tongue, the meaning of the outburst being 
"Hurry away ! hurry, hurry !" But that 
was not all; one of the birds uttered an- 
other call, which I translated, "Go ware ! 
go ware !" delivered in so raucous a tone 
that it might have frightened one who was 
not used to uncanny sounds in lonely 
places. Presently the whole company dis- 
appeared, not caring for human society any 
longer, but I could still hear them filing 
their saws far up in the mountain side. 

While there were many birds at the low- 
er end of the ravine where it opened into 
the valley, their numbers grew less the 
farther I climbed into the mountains. In 
all my rambling I found this the case. 
Comparatively few birds care for the soli- 
tudes ; at least, their favorite haunts are in 
the neighborhood of babbling streams, 
where they can drink and bathe without 
making too long a journey. Far up the 
hollows from Bailey's a few Western rob- 
ins, gray headed j uncos and mountain 
chickadees were seen, and their voices 
seemed sad in those solitudes, whereas 
down in the valley their songs sounded rol- 
licksome as they mingled with the roar of 
the mountain stream. 

Other birds seen in this neighborhood 
were pine siskins, which are the same as 
the siskins of the East, only they do not 
go so far North to breed, finding the cli- 
mate they want in the mountains ; Audu- 
bon's warblers, almost like the myrtle 



warblers in Eastern States; mountain blue- 
birds, whose breasts are blue instead of 
reddish brown; Say's phcebes, distinctly a 
Western species ; spotted sandpipers, with 
which Easterners are familiar ; Western 
nighthawks, which zigzag overhead and 
"boom" now and then, just as their Eastern 
cousins do ; and red shafted flickers, tak- 
ing the place of the well known golden 
winged flicker of the East. 

The sweetest and best bird of all has 
been reserved to be mentioned last. It was 
at Bailey's that my long and wearisome 
search for the nest of the white crowned 
sparrow was rewarded. In many a moun- 
tain valley, from an altitude of 7,000 feet to 
the foot of the loftiest peaks far above 
timber line, I had found the white-crowns, 
singing their dulcet tunes, and had sought 
in vain for their nests, probably because it 
was a little too early in the season. 

One evening at Bailey's, as I was walk- 
ing along the bank of the noisy creek, a 
male white-crown was singing blithely in 
the bushes, and I stopped to listen to his 
vesper hymn. Presently a female scuttled 
to my side of the stream, chirped uneasily 
a moment, and then flitted to a bush- 
clump, into which she slipped. The little 
lady fluttered away as I peeped into the 
bush, and there was the pretty nest, con- 
taining 4 white eggs dappled with brown, 
looking like pearls in a tiny casket. All the 
while the male trilled his liveliest airs to 
beguile my attention. His mate chirped 
anxiously, and so I hurried away to set her 
mind at rest, glad I had found a white- 
crown's nest, and just as glad to leave it 
undisturbed. 




SPOTTED SANDPIPER, ACTITIS MACULAR1A. 
Can Any Reader of Recreation Identify it? 



AMATEUR PHOTO BV J. BAUERSl 






MY FIRST LESSON IN TRAPPING. 



KATE E. NORCROSS. 



I could not have been over 9 years old 
when I received my first lesson in trap- 
ping. Dave, our hired man, promised to 
make me a box trap in which I could 
catch quails and other birds. I was greatly 
delighted and could think and talk of noth- 
ing else until it was completed. 

One Saturday afternoon the trap was fin- 
ished and Dave carried it to a plum thicket 
400 yards from the house. There he 
scraped away the snow and built a pen of 
fence rails, in which he put the trap. He 
showed me how to set it and pointed out 
the little slide door on top through which I 
was to take the captured birds, one by one. 
After baiting the trap with corn and scat- 
tering more in and about the pen, we re- 
turned to the house. The remainder of the 
day I was too restless to sit down or do 
anything else but talk to my brother Lish 
about the trap. Several times we stole 
cautiously to a knoll that overlooked our 
treasure, but fortune did not favor us that 
day. 

No sooner were we dressed the next 
morning than Lish and I hurried again to 
the knoll. The trap was down ! My 
heart beat painfully as I rushed to it, and 
yet more painfully when I found it empty. 
The trigger string had been cut and I 
could do nothing but hurry to Dave with 
the woeful story. 

He said a hare had been caught and had 
cut the string in gnawing his way out. He 
promised to make a dead fall to catch the 
rascal, and cautioned me to close the quail 
trap at night. When he had repaired and 
rebaited the trap I began my second day's 
watch. 

Nothing happened until 3 o'clock, when 



we found the trap sprung. I flew to it, my 
brother at my heels, and the sight that met 
our eyes was soul delighting. The trap was 
filled with quails. I stepped into the pen, 
slipped my hand through the slide door and 
seized a plump, bright-eyed beauty. I had 
with one hand gathered my big apron into 
a bag and in that I put the bird. I reached 
in the pen, caught another quail and was 
putting it in my apron when the first 
slipped out and flew away. Lish smiled, 
but I didn't. As I grabbed a third bird, No. 
2 made his escape. The next was fairly in 
the bag before No. 3 took his departure. 

By that time Lish had progressed through 
smiles, giggles and uproarious laughter to 
a state of exhaustion that compelled him to 
cling to the pen for support. I scowled at 
him savagely while putting the next bird in 
my apron, only to hear another burst of 
laughter as No. 4 took flight. Improbable 
as it sounds, that thing continued until 11 
birds had escaped from me and only one re- 
mained in the trap. I grabbed the last 
victim with both hands and started mourn- 
fully for the house. As I was climbing the 
garden fence the top rail broke, letting me 
fall to the ground and freeing my twelfth 
captive. 

I reached home the most crestfallen crea- 
ture in the world. Lish giggled while I 
told the story and my parents strove hard 
to suppress their emotions. Even beefy 
faced, shock headed Dave showed no sym- 
pathy. "Why, Kate," he said, "why didn't 
you pull their heads off as fast as you 
caught them?" 

"You didn't tell me to," I protested. 

" 'Course not," he replied ; "I thought 
anyone had sense enough for that." 



THE SWAMP ANGEL 



FRANK H. SWEET. 



Hark! the hermit thrush is singing, 

And his wild, ethereal strain, 
Like a silver horn is ringing 

Over forest, hill and plain. 
"O speral, speral, speral !" 

We seem to hear him say, 
"O holy, holy, holy! 

O clear, O clear away!" 



From gloomy swamps and lonely ways, 

And woodlands that are wild and dim, 
We hear in rising notes of praise 

The hermit's tender evening hymn; 
"O holy, holy, holy!" 

We seem to hear him say, 
"O speral, speral, speral ! 

O clear, O clear away !" 



107 



. THE RED HEAD. 



ALLAN BROOKS. 



The redhead has a wide distribution, be- 
ing found throughout the continent from 
Atlantic to Pacific. Unlike its congen- 
ers, it is not found in the far North, 
and is one of the few diving ducks thai 
breed commonly as far South as the United 
States. In the old world it is replaced by 
a closely allied species, the pochard, which 
differs from the redhead in the coarser 
vermiculations of the back and flanks. In 
America the redhead is often confused with 
the far-famed canvasback; but this can al- 



The redhead is a fine game duck, fre- 
quenting marshes in preference to salt wa- 
ter, and is generally a first class table bird, 
as its food is more exclusively vegetarian 
than that of most other diving ducks. It is 
a rapid flyer and an expert diver. A 
winged redhead will generally make good 
its escape if there is any cover within 
reach. 

The redhead seems to be a silent duck. 
During the pairing season it utters a low, 
grating cry, at the same time shaking and 




THE RED HEAD, AYTHYA AMERICANA. 



ways be distinguished in both sexes by the 
long narrow bill, which is entirely black, 
instead of leaden blue with a black tip, as 
in the redhead. A much closer ally of the 
redhead is the ringbill, or ringnecked duck. 
In form, habits, and coloration of eggs the 
ringbill and the redhead are identical, and 
the female of the ringbill is an almost ex- 
act miniature of the female redhead. Old 
male redheads also acquire the white sub- 
terminal band across the bill, though this 
is never so pronounced as in the ringbill. 



jerking its head about, exactly as if some- 
thing was stuck in its throat. The ruddy 
duck has the same action when courting. 

In most localities West of the Rockies 
the redhead is scarce, and I have never 
observed in British Columbia the enor- 
mous flocks of them that one sees in East- 
ern America. 

In the adult male the iris is deep yellow, 
in the female more brownish. The feet are 
dull lead color, with black webs; bill lead- 
en blue, with tip and extreme base black. 



A Georgia man, who has gone to Wash- 
ington in search of a government job, gives 
as his qualifications : "I can not only write 
poetry and novels, but there ain't a govern- 
ment mule that can throw me.' — Atlanta 
Constitution. 

108 



PETE MADE HIS MARK. 



E. M. LEETE. 



About the -nicest-thing to ride is a hobby, 
if you don't aide ...too, much. The hobby 
that suits me best; is", fishing, from what 
little I know 'of it.. Of course 1- should not 
wish to -fish all the time nor make a busi- 
ness of it. Sundays I would willingly give 
up the sport,, and-, even on. Saturday after- 
noon, if my family needed anything, I 
should enjoy doing what I could for 
them. 

It has always seemed strange to me that 
my wife looks at the matter in a different 
light. She is a sensible woman about al- 
most everything else. I have argued with 
her by the hour and tried to show her how 
much the children enjoyed a fish dinner. 
I have pointed out that fish was a brain 
food and saved a whole lot on the meat 
bill; but talk as I would, and I have even 
worked nights at it, I could not convince 
that woman. She will insist on my being 
at the office nearly all the time. 

There are times, however, when one has 
a cold, or a corn, or may be a headache 
that only fresh air will cure. Now, air is 
never so fresh as when coming over water, 
and if you are going to take it that way 
why not fish at the same time? 

One day, as I had a cold or was afraid 
I should have one, I spoke to my fishing 
mate, Luther, and suggested that the tide 
was coming about right for fish the next 
day, and if he knew where there was any 
bait we might go. I never like to go alone, 
and this friend, while not handsome, is 
useful in a boat. He is a fair angler, 
mostly catching the small ones that snoop 
my bait. The big fish I take care of. I 
did know of his putting one large fish in 
the boat ; that is, I hooked and played it, 
and Luther lifted it in for me. 

We had a common friend, Pete, who 
worked in a bank. He went down at 8 
or 9 in the morning, and sat on a high 
stool until 3 p.m. I often envied that 
man his job. If a man must work, it 
struck me that he couldn't do much less. 
We feared Pete was getting run down, 
and was perhaps going into a decline, so 
we invited him to come with us. He said 
he hated to leave his business, but he sup- 
posed someone must go along to look 
after us and he would be that one. 

For once everything worked to a charm ; 
and io o'clock the next day found us at 
Duck island, with a basket of fish and 
some bait left. The tide was well up and 
the fish had nearly stopped biting when we 
decided to try another ground. There was 
a rock on the West side of the island, near 
the shore, called "Junk of Pork," from its 



shape. It was 8 feet square on top, with 
vertical sides standing 7 feet out of water. 
It was a hard rock to land a fish on, and 
not an easy one to land oneself on ; but the 
fishing near it was good at high tide. 

On that rock I landed my 2 friends, with 
a basket, some bait and a spare snood or 
2, while I went just around the other side 
of the island to Table rock. I anchored the 
boat, bow and stern, and went to fishing. I 
fished as hard as I could, for to tell the 
truth, my companions, while coming from 
good families, had their faults. Their train- 
ing had been sadly neglected in some par- 
ticulars, and if by any chance they should 
show the most fish when we met, they 
would be very likely to say unkind things. 
My boat lay perhaps 5 rods from the shore 
and between me and the land there were 
rocks of all sizes, covered with the sharpest 
of barnacles. 

The light wind of early morning had 
died out, and the hot sun shone on a sea 
of glass. Schooners bound East had 
dropped their jibs and anchored, unable 
to stem the flood tide. The smoke from a 
tug with a long tow of barges was black- 
ening the clear blue of the sky. Aside 
from a few gulls playing overhead the sea 
was asleep, and all was quiet. 

I was nearly asleep myself, when hap- 
pening to glance toward the island, I be- 
held a strange sight. On that little island, 
4 miles off shore, with not a soul on it, 
as I supposed, I saw a man clothed as was 
our alleged forefather, Adam, save that I 
noted a lamentable absence of fig leaves. 
He did not even wear a smile ; in fact, he 
wore nothing but his skin. I noticed, how- 
ever, that it was a good fit. As he came 
nearer I saw red marks on his body, run- 
ning up and down, with now and then one 
across. Further inspection showed it was 
Pete. He was walking carefully, and well 
he might, for the rocks were covered with 
barnacles, and barnacles are no better than 
broken glass to walk on. He limped along 
by the bushes, down to the water's edge. 
Then I hailed him. He was not talkative, 
so I waited and watched. He jumped from 
one rock to another, now waist deep in the 
water, now on the surface, and again swim- 
ming a few strokes until he gained the 
boat. 

He had been so occupied with his gym- 
nastics that I could not attract his atten- 
tion ; but when he was fairly seated in the 
boat I felt that I had a right to know what 
ail this was about. 

What he said first I will not repeat, but 
it had condemnatory reference to barnacles. 



109 



no 



RECREATION. 



Later I gathered that he had hooked a fish, 
just after they had landed, and had lost his 
hooks, snood and all. They both- supposed 
there were plenty of spare hooks in the bas- 
ket, but were unable to find any; so, being 
carried away with piscatorial ardor, Pete 
stripped and in some way, best known to 
himself, got into the water from that high 
rock, gained the shore and came to me for 
more hooks. He appeared rather mussed 
up, as he sat with the water dripping from 
his body and his hair plastered down with 



the wet. His stomach looked like a 
weather map of New England after a bliz- 
zard. From what I could learn I inferred 
that the barnacles cut him. It certainly 
looked that way to an outsider. He asked 
me if I thought the gashes would heal. I 
said "Yes" ; but he seemed to think he was 
marked for life. We weighed anchor and 
went over for Luther and for Pete's 
clothes, and when the basket was handed 
down we discovered the missing hooks un- 
derneath it. No remarks were made. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY H T, WHITMORE. 



THREE OF A KIND. 
Made with Korona Camera. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY H, T WHITMORt 



A STUDY IN BLACK AND WHITE. 
Made with Korona Camera. 



SARANAC LAKE TO CANADA BY WATER. 



CHARLES D. FERNALD. 



Not having felt well for several weeks, 
I decided to take a rest, and have a change 
from the grind of business to nature, for 
she is so gentle in the spring. With- 
in 4 hours 1 was abroad the New 
York Central's Adirondack train, with shot 
gun, fishing rod and other tackle. I had 
no idea where I should leave the train, but 
later decided to go to my old starting place, 
Saranac Lake. There I secured as guide 
John Benham, who is the best member of 
his profession I have ever met. He was 
the owner of a small Adirondack skiff, 14 
feet in length, 28 inches beam, and in that 
canoe I decided tc take a trip. 

We started from Saranac Lake at noon 
Thursday, April 18, bound for Montreal by 
water. We had to go by the Saranac 
river to Plattsburgh, then by Lake Cham- 
plain and the St. Lawrence the remainder 
of the distance. Thursday afternoon we 
made good time for about 20 miles, and 
stopped at a log house near Union Falls for 
the night. Friday we had a hard, danger- 
ous day. We left Union Falls about 6.30 a. 
m., and started for Plattsburgh, which we 
expected to reach by night. 

Above Union Falls we had passed 
through some bad rapids, but what we found 
below Union Falls made the others look 
like still watej. We had 7 miles of white 
water, or white caps. We ran most 
of the way, but toward the end we had 
to get out and carry, about 12 miles, 
in all. The river is so crooked in that 
country, that it is hard to estimate the 
distance between 2 places. We came 
near running over High falls at Russia. 
We were running along in water that was 
going like a mill race, with plenty of rocks 
to make it interesting, when suddenly we 
saw the river drop. We could not stop 
ourselves, so we went into the rapids. 
They were fierce, the river dropping off 
foot after foot. We ran through them 
about a mile before we could get near 
enough to the shore to catch the bank as 
it went by. After landing, we went below 
and watched the river tearing and whirl- 



ing through the big cut in the mountain 
at Russia, where the drop of the falls is 
between 160 and 170 feet. Had we gone 
% of a mile farther we should have 
been done for. No boat can live in the 
falls 60 seconds. 

We continued down the river and reached 
Cadyville that night. There we put up at 
an apology for a hotel. In the middle of 
the night I was awakened by someone try- 
ine to get into my room. I took my re- 
volver and waited. Soon a man's head 
and shoulders were thrust through the win- 
dow. I called out to know what he wanted. 
As soon as he answered I knew he was 
under the influence of liquor. He was try- 
ing to get to his room, which was next 
to mine, without anyone's knowing it, and 
he had taken the wrong window. I was 
thankful I did not shoot first, and inquire 
afterward what he wanted. 

Saturday morning we started on. The 
rapids still made it interesting. We 
reached Plattsburgh that evening, put up at 
a hotel and took in the town. Sunday 
morning we started on to Rouse's Point, 
on Lake Champlain. A stiff breeze was 
blowing off the lake on to Cumberland 
Head. It was foolhardy to start, but I 
did not realize that until we were out in 
the lake. The water was running high 
and was capped with white. The little boat 
behaved nobly, however, and took us safe to 
shore. The wind died out about 4 o'clock 
and then we made better time. We arrived 
at Rouse's Point at 8 o'clock Sunday even- 
ing. There I realized I had enough. If 
we should go farther we would find our- 
selves running the Lachine rapids in our 
skiff; so I sent the guide back to Saranac 
Lake over the Chateaugay road and took a 
train on to Montreal, which was about 40 
miles down the river. After staying in 
Montreal a day, I took the train back to 
Saranac and to my surprise learned that 
Jack had sold our skiff at Rouse's Point 
after I left. Tuesday evening I returned 
to New York, with a color like an Indian's 
and feeling like a new man. 



Little Willie — Say, pa, what was Wash- 
ington's object in crossing the Delaware? 

Pa — He probably heard the peach crop 
was a failure and crossed over to investi- 
gate. — Exchange. 



in 



112 



RECREATION. 



SUICIDE? 

The photo herewith shows an oriole's 
nest which I discovered a few days ago in 
a fallen tree. The dead and dried body of 




the builder was suspended from the nest 
by a horse hair about its neck. The body 
of the bird is in good condition. 

E. B. Heiney, Huntington, Ind. 



"I suppose you keep in touch with your 
nephew while he's away at college," said 
Dr. Choker to Mr. Munn. 

"Well, he keeps touching me, if that's 
what you mean," replied the uncle. — Detroit 
Free Press. 



FARMER BROWN'S EXPERIENCE. 

W. A. FULLER. 

I'd read into the papers thet 

Come every week from town, 
How they was made a sort of spoon 

Fer lurin' fish aroun'. 

I bought one, rigged 'er up, and went 
Straight off down to the crick, 

And dropped it in real quiet-like, 
Right where the fish was thick. 

I kinder chuckled as I thought 
How s'prised the folks would look 

When I brought home the fish I'd ketch 
On thet new-fangled hook; 

And as I sot and waited with 

My back agin a tree, 
I thought how some folks never knowed 

What great inventions be. 

I waited quiet-like and still, 

The fish they waited, too ; 
"What's this?" it seemed as if they said, 

"This here is something new !" 

So there I sot and fished and fished 

From early morn till night, 
And when the sun was goin' down, 

1 hadn't had a bite. 

I pulled my line in, wound 'er up, 

Looked kinder shy around; 
And then I took that fancy hook, 

And stomped it on the ground. 

I've no more use fer fancy rigs, 

Or shiners made of tin, 
Fer angle worms '11 ketch more fish 

Than spoon baits ever kin. 



Have been a reader of your magazine 
nearly 3 years. Have every issue on file 
since October, '99, and would not take 
many times the cost for them. It is the 
best sportsmen's journal published. The 
Peters Cartridge Co. and the Marlin peo- 
ple were foolish to withdraw their ads 
because somebody did not like their goods. 
L. W. Putoz, Westfield, Mass. 



Recreation is the best sportsmen's 
magazine published. Am glad to see the 
subscription list growing so fast. 

F. B. Cortright, Mauch Chunk, Pa. 



Recreation is, as you claim, the ideal 
sportsmen's magazine of the country. 
E. B. Dennett, Portland, Me. 



Can't do without Recreation. 

S. D. Bristow, Cherokee, Iowa 



THE MOOSE HEAD AT THE PAN-AMERICAN. 



I notice in the editorial department of 
January Recreation an inquiry regarding 
a moose head measuring 67 inches, which 
it is supposed was exhibited by the On- 
tario government at the Pan-American 
Exposition. 

I do not know certainly that the head 
was exhibited by the Ontario government, 
but I had in my hands, for the purpose of 
mounting, a head, photo of which 1 here- 
with enclose you. The antlers had an ex- 




treme spread of 67 inches, number of prongs 
16 and 17, width of palm 18 and 19 inches, 
inside beam 42 inches, circumference of 
burr close to head 14 inches. The horns 
are a beautiful rich brown color, and sym- 
metrical. The head was large, and in pro- 
portion with the horns. The skin was a 
beautiful dark color, and the whisker, or 
bell, was intact, measuring 12$ inches. 

This moose was shot on the Demoine . 
river, which is a tributary of the Ottawa 
river, about 50 miles from Pembroke, by 
an Indian named Batice Seymo. The 
head was secured by R. A. McCracken, 
agent for the E. B. Eddy Company at Big 
Lake, who brought it to me, for mounting. 
Mr. McCracken afterward presented it to 
Mr. W. H. Rowley, secretary-treasurer of 
he E. B. Eddy Company at Ottawa, Ont- 
tario. I understood the head was to go to 
the American exposition at Buffalo. 

I handle a large number of moose heads, 
and I find in this head a most remarkable 
thing, which you will notice in the photo; 
namely, that it attains its greatest meas- 
urement 19 inches from the burr forward 
on the front palm, both sides being well 
developed. 

This head is now in possession of Mr. 



Rowley at Ottawa. If you, or any reader 
of Recreation, may wish any furtherin- 
formation I shall be most happy to fur- 
nish it. 

G. H. Belaire, Pembroke, Ontario 

Regarding the moose head at the Pan- 
American Exposition the statement as to 
its measurements is correct, it was mount- 
ed for the Ontario Government, by Messrs. 
Oliver Spanner & Co., of this city, and it 
was on view in their shop window. It is a 
fine specimen, said to be the largest ever 
killed in Ontario. It was killed near Po- 
wassan, about 20 miles South of the Town 
of North Bay, on Lake Nippising. 

H. F. Overton, Toronto, Canada. 

The moose head about which you inquire 
was killed at Powassan, Ontario. The 
spread was exactly 66 inches. This head is 
in the possession of the Provincial Gov- 
ernment. 

Two heads obtained near Sturgeon Falls, 
Ontario, about a year ago, measured 56 and 
S3 T A inches respectively. These 3 heads 
were in our Forestry building at the Pan- 
American Exposition. 

Oliver Spanner & Co., Toronto, Canada. 



HOW TO MAKE A CAMP. 

Camp life, because of its simplicity, is 
rapidly coming into vogue. Here are a few 
simple directions : 

Secure a good forest and a fair sized lake 
in some uninhabited region where game 
abounds, and clear away a tract of 3 or 4 
acres. This can be made into a fine lawn 
with a few hundred carloads of imported 
sod. In the centre erect your buildings. 
The main building need not be more than 
3 stories high, and can be built of white 
marble on the outside and white mahogany 
on the inside. A good living house liKe this 
can be put up for about $20,000. The serv- 
ants' quarters should be separate. So should 
the barn. A boat house can be built on the 
lake, and a wharf not more than a mile long 
is desirable. After this, all you need is a 
windmill for pumping water, an electric 
light plant, 3 or 4 steam launches, an ice 
house, a bowling alley and a ping pong 
court. The whole affair need not cost more 
than $100,000. — Life. 



It is a great pleasure to get subscriptions 
for Recreation, which is so alive and up- 
to-date. All I did was to give my friends 
a back number and they all say Recrea- 
tion is the best sportsmen's journal pub- 
lished. 

Walter Harris, San Gabriel, Cal. 



"3 



li 4 



RECREATION. 



YOUNG BRISTLEBACKS. 
The enclosed photo tells its own story, 
so just put these 2 porkers with the others 
and roast them to suit your taste. You 
see they have their faces turned away. They 
evidently had in mind what you might do 
to them. These 2 butchers shot 42 cotton- 
tails and boasted that only one got away. 
They regretted that work prevented further 
slaughter. We have but little game here 
and it is an outrage that such hoggishness 
should be tolerated. These 2 boys, whose 
names are Billy Schermerhorn and Frank 
Seecum, kill everything they see. Roast 




them brown and show them how they look 
in the eyes of true sportsmen. 

L. A. F., Radnor, Pa. 

These boys were wise in turning their 
backs to the camera. No doubt they look 
much handsomer that way than they would 
if their faces could be seen. Any man or 
boy who will slaughter game to the ex- 
tent these boys did may well feel ashamed 
of it. I trust the time may soon come 
when no one will be willing to stand up 
and confess such a crime before the world 
in the way of a photograph. — Editor. 



Recreation has done more toward 
educating game hogs to abandon their 
shameful practices than anything ever 
before published. 

W.H.Hubbard, Glenwood Springs, Col. 



the greatest magazine 
30 subscriptions in 2 



Recreation is 
out. I secured 

hours from people not at all interested in 
sport. 

W. M. Barrett, East Windsor, N. Y 



'TAIN'T TH' SAME. 

Guess my tackle is th' best — 
Rod o' steel an' fancy flies ; 

Lines that stand th' toughest test — 
Reels enough for every size ; 

Yet when I a-fishin' go 
An' recall th' early fame 

Of a boy I used to know, 
"Tain't th' same. 

Useter own a hickory rod — 
Hook, cork, sinker — nothin' more ; 

Useter turn th' garden sod 

After worms 'longside th' door. 

Useter angle in th' brook — 
Speckle trout aroun' me came, 

Seemed to hanker for my hook — 
'Tain't th' same. 

There I'd sit an' fish an' fish, 

Starin' at th' quiet pool ; 
Sit an' watch an' wait, an' wish — 

Quite forgettin' home an' school, 
Often caught a lickin', my ! 

Dad was quick to place th' blame ! 
Fishin' cost this youngster high — 
'Tain't th' same. 

Fishin', an' inventin' tales — 

Kind o' skatin' round the truth, 
Is a snort that never stales 

In th' golden days o' youth. 
Got th' tackle that's the best, 

Yet th' sport seems gettin' tame ; 
What's the tackle 'thout th' zest? 
'Tain't th' same. 

— Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



Recreation is the finest magazine 
published. 

S. A. Munson, Indianapolis, Ind. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY MRS. F. W. TILDEN. 



WILL YOU WALK INTO MY PARLOR ? 



ALASKAN GAME TO BE SAVED. 



Another great victory has been achieved. 
The bill for the protection of game in 
Alaska has passed both Houses of Con- 
gress, has been signed by the President 
and is now a law. For this, all sportsmen 
are deeply indebted to that veteran fighter 
for the birds and the wild animals, the 
Hon. John F. Lacey, who introduced this 
bill and has pushed it through both Houses. 

The L. A. S. has rendered valuable as- 
sistance in this work. A large majority of 
our members responded promptly to the 
call sent out to them immediately after 
Mr. Lacey introduced the Alaskan bill, 
and thousands of letters from Congressmen 
and Senators, to League members, have 
been sent me. In these letters, a majority 
of the Representatives and Senators 
pledged their constituents unconditional 
support of the bill, and they have made 
good their promises. Following is the full 
text of the bill: 

From and after the passage of this Act the wan- 
ton destruction of wild game animals or wild birds, 
the destruction of nests and eggs of such birds, 
or the killing of any wild birds other than a game 
bird, or of a wild game animal, for the purposes ot 
shipment from Alaska is hereby prohibited. The 
term "game animals" shall include deer, moose, 
caribou, sheep, mountain goats, "bears, sea lions, 
and walrus. The term "game birds" shall include 
water fowl, commonly known as ducks, geese, brant 
and swans; shore birds, commonly known as 
plover, snipe and curlew, and the several species 
of grouse and ptarmigan. Nothing in this Act shall 
affect any law now in force in Alaska relating to 
the fur seal, sea otter, or any fur-bearing animal 
other than bears and sea lions, or prevent the kill- 
ing of any game animal or bird for food or cloth- 
ing by native Indians or Eskimo or by miners, ex- 
plorers, or travelers on a journey when in need of 
food; but the game animals or birds so killed shall 
not be shipped or sold. 

It shall be unlawful for any person in Alaska to 
kill any wild game animals or wild birds except 
during the seasons hereinafter provided: Large 
brown bears, April 15 to June 30, both inclusive; 
moose, caribou, walrus, and sea lions, September 
1 to October 31, both inclusive; deer, sheep, and 
mountain goats, September 1 to December 15, both 
inclusive; grouse, ptarmigan, shore birds, and water 
fowl, September 1 to December 15, both inclusive: 
Provided, that the Secretary of Agriculture is here- 
by authorized whenever he shall deem it neces- 
sary for the preservation of game animals or birds 
to make and publish rules and regulations which 
shall modify the close seasons hereinbefore estab- 
lished, or provide different close seasons for dif- 
ferent parts of Alaska, or place further restrictions 
and limitations on the killing of such animals or 
birds in any given locality, or to prohibit killing 
for a period not exceeding 5 years in such locality. 
It shall be unlawful for any person at any time 
to kill any females or yearlings of moose, caribou, 
deer, or sheep, or for any one person to kill in any 
one year more than the number specified of each 
of the following game animals: 2 moose, walrus, 
or sea lions; 4 caribou, sheep, goats, or large 
brown bears; 8 deer; or to kill or have in posses- 
sion in any one day more than 10 grouse or ptar- 
migan, or 25 shore birds or water fowl. 

It shall be unlawful for any person at any time 
to hunt with hounds, to use a shot gun larger than 



10 gauge, or any gun other than that which 
can be fired from the shoulder, or to use steam 
launches or any boats other than those propelled 
by oars or paddles in the pursuit of game animals 
or birds. The Secretary of Agriculture ; s au- 
thorized to make and publish such further restric- 
tions as he may deem necessary to prevent undue 
destruction of wild game animals or wild birds. 

It shall be unlawful for any person or persons 
at any time to sell or offer for sale any hides, skins, 
or heads of any game animals or game birds in 
Alaska, or to sell, or offer for sale therein, any 
game animals or game birds, or parts thereof, dur- 
ing the time when the killing of said animals or 
birds is prohibited: Provided, that it shall be law- 
ful for dealers having in possession any game ani- 
mals or game birds legally killed during the open 
season to dispose of the same within 15 days after 
the close of said season. 

It shall be unlawful for any person, firm, or 
corporation or their officers or agents to deliver to 
any common carrier, or for the owner, agent, or 
master of any vessel or for any other person to re- 
ceive for shipment or have in possession with in- 
tent to ship out of Alaska any hides or carcasses 
of caribou, deer, moose, mountain sheep, or moun- 
tain goat, or parts thereof, or any wild birds or 
parts thereof: Provided, that nothing in this Act 
shall be construed to prevent the collection of speci- 
mens for scientific purposes, the capture or ship- 
ment of live animals and birds for exhibition or 
propagation, or the export from Alaska of speci- 
mens and trophies, under such restrictions and lim- 
itations as the Secretary of Agriculture may pre- 
scribe and publish. 

Any person violating any of the provisions of 
this Act or any of the regulations promulgated by 
the Secretary of Agriculture shall be deemed guilty 
of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof 
shall forfeit to the United States all game or birds 
in his possession, and all guns, traps, nets, or boats 
used in killing or capturing said game or birds, 
and shall be punished for each offense by a fine 
of not more than $200, or imprisonment not more 
than 3 months, or by both such fine and imprison- 
ment, in the discretion of the court: Provided, 
that upon conviction for the second or any subse- 
quent offense there may be imposed in addition a 
fine of $50 for any violation of sections 1 and 3, 
and a fine of $100 for a violation of section 2. It 
is hereby made the duty of all marshals and deputy 
marshals, collectors or deputy collectors of customs 
appointed for Alaska, and all officers of revenue 
cutters to assist in the enforcement of this Act. 
Any marshal or deputy marshal may arrest without 
warrant any person found violating any of the 
provisions of this Act or any of the regulations 
herein provided, and may seize any game, birds, 
or hides, and any traps, nets, guns, boats, or other 
paraphernalia used in the capture of such game or 
birds and found in the possession of said person; 
and any collector or deputy collector of customs, or 
any person authorized in writing by a marshal, shall 
have the power above provided to arrest persons 
found violating this Act or said regulations, to 
seize said property without warrant, and to keep 
and deliver the same to a marshal or a deputy mar- 
shal. It shall be the duty of the Secretary of the 
Treasury, on request of the Secretary of Agricul- 
ture, to aid in carrying out the provisions of this 
Act. Provided further, that nothing contained in 
the foregoing sections of this Act shall be construed 
or held to prohibit or limit the right of the Smith- 
sonian Institution to collect in or ship from the 
District of Alaska animals or birds for the use of 
the Zoological Park in Washington, District of Col- 
umbia: Provided further, that such heads and 
hides as may have been taken before the passage 
of this Act, may be shipped out of Alaska at any 
time prior to the first day of July, 1902. 



"5 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 

The man who quits when he gets enough, with plenty of game still in sight, is a real sportsman. 



CAMP COOKERY. 

MRS. A. ATWOOD. 

It was a novel experience to make 
light bread when we were out camping, 
and it took the greater part of 2 days to 
accomplish it. About noon I put a cake of 
dry yeast to soak. When it was thorough- 
ly softened, I poured it into a tin lard 
bucket, added one cup of water and one 
of flour, stirred it well, and set it in a 
warm place to rise. 

That sounds easy, doesn't it? But it took 
all my ingenuity to find the warm place. I 
put the pail in a large iron kett-le, and sat 
the kettle just near enough to the camp 
fire to keep it warm, turning it frequently. 
Both pail and kettle were covered with tin 
covers. 

Besides our camp wagon we had a top 
buggy, which had a waterproof lid over 
the rear of the box. At night I added to my 
bread batter 2 cups of water, enough flour 
to make it thick, and a small handful of salt. 
We did not keep our fire burning all night, 
and on account of the dogs, or possible 
wild "varmints." I could not leave the 
dough as in the afternoon. I put it in the 
back of the buggy box, placed 2 or 3 heated 
stones beside it, and packed the space under 
the buggy seat with gunny sacks. In the 
morning everything was white with frost, 
and I feared for the success of my bread, 
but it looked light and bubbly. I worked 
into it all the flour I could and put it near 
the fire to keep warm. It was about 3 
hours before it was sufficiently light. I 
kneaded it well, and molded out a pie pan 
full of small rolls. The Man insists on 
calling them biscuit. In another hour the 
rolls were light enough to bake. I baked 
them as slowly as possible in the Dutch 
oven. I had, however, too much dough. 
I could not bake it all before it would 
sour. I made one loaf, as flat as possible, 
put it in a pie pan, and had enough for 2 
more loaves. I greased 2 small lard pails 
and put half the bread in each. They were 
about 1-3 full. I kept one as warm, as pos- 
sible without baking it, and the other as 
cool as I thought it would keep and con- 
tinue to rise, so they need not be cooked 
at the same time. To cook them I put 
them in the kettle .and filled it half full of 
boiling water. I had to put a stone on 
top of the pail cover to keep it from tip- 
ping over in the water. After an hour's 
boiiing the loaf was done, and our hungry 
hunters pronounced it fine. 

One of our party had a birthday to cele- 
brate while we were out, so we fixed up a 



big dinner in honor of the occasion. The 
especial surprise of the feast was apple 
dumplings. I made ordinary biscuit dough 
and flattened it out into 4 pieces, each 
about the size of a breakfast plate. On 
each piece I put 3 or 4 pieces of apple, 
pared and cored, and a tablespoonful of 
sugar. I pinched the edges of the dough 
together, put the dumplings in a greased 
pail and boiled them, like the bread, 3 
hours. 

The hunters had a bottle of vinegar to 
use in cleaning their guns. On that day 
I took one tablespoonful of the vinegar, 
stirred it into one cup of sugar and 2 table- 
spoonfuls of flour, added one cup of boiling 
water, let it boil once, and it made a good 
sauce for our dumplings. 

Roast duck : Put 2 small ducks in the 
Dutch oven, with as many sweet potatoes 
as you will want. Sprinkle with salt, add 
one cup of water and a tablespoonful of 
butter or grease. Bake one hour, keeping 
the oven at a brisk heat, but avoid burning. 
Stuffed squirrel : Only young and ten- 
der game should be prepared in this way. 
Dress them in the usual manner, fill them 
with bits of moistened bread, well seasoned 
with pepper, salt and sage, or onions, if 
they are to be had. Sew them up carefully, 
place in the frying pan with a little water, 
steam till tender, then add a spoonful of 
grease, and brown them nicely. Remove 
the thread, take the squirrels out of the 
frying pan, and make a brown gravy. 
Squirrels are also good when roasted. 

Boiled meat with dumplings was one of 
our favorite dishes, for with coffee it made 
a complete meal. Use any scraps of veni- 
son, or other game, boil till tender in an 
abundance of water, season well, and throw 
in the dumplings, made as biscuit dough. 
Replace the cover, let it boil rapidly 15 
minutes, and you have bread, gravy and 
meat all out of one kettle. 

Deviled meat: It sometimes happens that 
there is a variety of small game brought in 
at the same time that another hunter 
brings to camp the first venison or turkey. 
To utilize this, make some deviled meat. 
Boil squirrels, quails, ducks and some of 
the venison all together until thoroughly 
tender. Let them cool a few minutes, then 
with 2 forks remove the bones and shred 
the meat as fine as possible. Put over the 
fire again, season well, and boil till the 
mass is almost dry. Pack it in empty tin 
cans and place a weight on each. It will 
prove delicious some day when the cook 
joins the hunters, and everyone comes home 



116 



FROM THE CAME FIELDS. 



it? 



to camp tired and hungry, or when on the 
move and there is little opportunity for 
cooking. 

We are not Southern folks, and did not 
take kindly to biscuit and hoecake, so for 
variety we sometimes made Boston brown 
bread, as follows: One pint of water, l /2 
cup of sorghum, 1-3 cup of grease, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, one cup of flour and one 
pint of corn meal. Pour into a greased 
pail, put the pail in a kettle of boiling water 
and boil 2 hours. Open the pail and put it 
near the fire a few moments to dry. May 
you enjoy camping as much as I did! 



A MISLEADING CIRCULAR. 

Roselle, N. J. 
Editor Recreation : 

In spite of the Lacey act, in spite of the 
L. A. S., the illegal depletion of our game 
covers continues, and we must still fight 
before we can hope to have good laws 
properly enforced. 

A few quotations from a circular will 
show how the market hunters are infring- 
ing on the rights of every sportsman. 
In the section given to Pennsylvania 
it says : "Ruffed grouse have been plentiful 
for several years in Venango county, but 
market hunting has depleted their number. 
During '96 at least 2,000 were shot in 
this county, where one pot hunter captured 
about 700. The same may be said of 
Tioga county. It is reported that market 
hunters sent to New York during '95 
over $5,000 worth of grouse. Westmore- 
land county yielded about $1,000 worth of 
game in '96, -consisting of wild turkey, 
grouse, quails, rabbits and squirrels. Five 
merchants in Wilkesbarre, from October, 
'95. to January, '97, sold 3,500 grouse. 
One Luzerne county hunter is reported to 
have killed in '96, within a radius of 30 
miles of Wilkesbarre, 804 grouse ; in '95 
this same individual marketed about 1,200 
grouse. York county formerly contained 
a great deal of game. A few years ago 
fully $8,000 worth was annually shipped 
from this county, but market shooting has 
greatly reduced the supply. From 5 town- 
ships in York county there were sent to 
market in one year 1,800 quails, 2,800 rab- 
bits, and 3,000 wild ducks. In 1896 a firm 
in Susquehanna county bought 3,000 
grouse, 1,500 quails, 30,000 squirrels, and 
40,000 rabbits." 

This work is still going on, for although 
it is unlawful to ship game out of 
nearly all States, it is still permissible to 
sell game within State limits. A grouse 
killed in Pennsylvania looks exactly the 
same as one killed in New York, and after 
the game illegally shipped is unpacked, 
who can detect the crime? As long as the 
sale of game is permitted anywhere, just 



so long will men shoot game for the mar- 
ket. Three Western States have abolished 
the game market, and have, under the 
guidance of the L. A. S., nobly commenced 
the final struggle for the preservation of 
our game. Let New York be "not the last 
to lay the old aside" ; let all States unite 
in this grand cause, and the battle will be 
won. This should be every sportsman's 
first endeavor. Spring shooting and every 
other kind of vandalism is not so destruct- 
ive as the game market. 

As a result of spring protection to game 
more birds are staying every year in Ver- 
mont to breed than formerly, and un- 
doubtedly when pickerel shooting is made 
unlawful many more will stay; as the con- 
stant banging of the pickerel shooter every 
spring must drive many ducks away. 

Even in New Jersey, where spring shoot- 
ing is still permitted, I know of 2 ducks' 
nests within 2 miles of Rahway. One is 
a wood duck's ; the other, a black duck's. 
If the open season ended January 1, thou- 
sands of ducks and marsh birds that ordi- 
narily go far into Canada would stay with 
us. The Canadian Indian, who smokes and 
salts down thousands of ducks for his food 
supply in winter, would wonder why the 
yearly flight across the line was growing 
less, and we should rejoice that our game 
birds were no longer driven to the far 
North. C. D. H. 

The statement you quote from the circu- 
lar is no doubt grossly exaggerated. For 
instance, it is stated that in one year 3,000 
ducks were shipped from 5 townships in 
York county, Pa. That is not a duck coun- 
try in any sense. A few ducks may be 
found each year along the Susquehanna 
river, but I doubt if even 200 were ever 
killed and shipped from that county in 
one year. 

The statement that a firm in Susque- 
hanna county bought and shipped 30,000 
squirrels in one year is simply absurd. I 
doubt if that many squirrels have been 
killed in that county in the past 10 years. 

A number of men have been prosecuted 
for violations of game laws in Susque- 
hanna and York counties within the past 5 
years, and but little illegal shooting or sell- 
ing of game is done in that county now. — 
Editor. 



HOW MR. SHARP CONSTRUES THE LAW. 
Hon. John Sharp, Salt Lake, Utah : 

I have several times been informed by 
citizens of your State that you have made 
ruling to the effect that a so-called sports- 
man may take with him in his boat a guide 
or pusher on the duck grounds ; that the 
sportsman may, if he choose, forbid the 
guide doing any shooting, and that he, the 



n8 



RECREATION. 



sportsman, may kill 80 ducks in a day. 
That when the 2 men come in from the 
shooting grounds with guns and with 80 
ducks in their boat, you do hot deem it 
proper to ascertain or have your deputies 
ascertain, whether each of the men killed 
40 of these birds or whether the employer 
killed all of them. I beg to inquire 
whether this report is correct. 

It is alleged by several earnest friends of 
game protection in your State that non-res- 
idents who go to Utah to shoot ducks make 
a practice of employing guides, of allowing 
them to carry their guns with them on the 
boat, and then of doing all the shooting, 
forbidding the guides to use their guns at 
all. One man in Colorado writes me di- 
rect that he took 4 men with him in a boat 
one day, and that as he did not allow them 
to do any shooting he killed 200 birds him- 
self. I do not credit this story, but should 
like to know how you construe the law 
which limits each man to 40 ducks. 

G. O. Shields. 

Salt Lake, Utah. 
Mr. G. O. Shields, New York: 

Reports similar to those you mention 
have reached me, and I have no doubt 
they are true to a considerable extent ; but 
as last season was the first in which we have 
had a limit law, I did not construe it one 
way or the other, thinking that true sports- 
men would not try to evade the clear 
meaning of the law the first season. It 
seems, however, there are few true sports- 
men to be found in an out-of-the-way 
place like Duckville, Utah. I construe the 
law just as it reads, and shall hereafter en- 
force it to the best of my ability. It will 
be difficult to enforce, as there is nothing 
in the law to prevent a boatman, or push- 
er, from taking his gun with him, unless 
the gun club makes a rule to that effect, 
and if the would-be sportsman allows his 
guide, or pusher, take his gun along, it 
will be difficult to say whether both or one 
does the shooting. They might be put un- 
der oath when they come in at night, but I 
have observed that men who are perfectly 
honest and upright in everything else will 
unhesitatingly steal and lie about fish and 
game. In the future this limit law will be 
enforced as far as possible, and each man, 
whether he be resident or non-resident, 
will be confined to his 40 bird limit. If it 
can be proven that any man takes the lib- 
erty of shooting the score of his guide, or 
pusher, the employer will be prosecuted. I 
can hardly believe the story of your 4-ply 
Colorado hog, but it is possible, and the 
deed might have been done without my 
hearing ©f it. With all the reported eva- 
sions and violations for the first season of 
the bag limit, I am pleased to say that the 
barbarous slaughter was reduced about 300 



per cent over former seasons, and I trust 
we shall be able to lessen it still more here- 
after. John Sharp, Commissioner. 



NOT SO BLACK AS PAINTED. 
The State of Durango has many American resi- 
dents. One of the most prominent is Dr. L. H. 
Barry. Dr. Barry, who is a most enthusiastic 
sportsman, has sent to friends here a number of 
photographs which show with what success his 
last expedition into the Sierra Madre country 
was crowned. The doctor and his family spent 8 
days in camp, during which time the doctor alone 
shot 19 deer, in addition to a great number of 
turkeys, grouse, and other fowl. This camp was 
pitched in the heart of the mountains, 85 miles 
from Durango, and was reached with a pack train 
of 12 Mexican burros. Included in the journey 
were the passage of a barren plateau and a stiff 
mountain climb. — Exchange. 

Regarding the statements contained in 
above clipping, Dr. Barry writes as fol- 
lows : 

In reply to your letter would say that 
your information is far from correct. We 
did kill 19 deer, but only 3 turkeys. Grouse 
are unknown in Mexico. There were 14 
in the party, and we were out 3 weeks. 
Twelve of the deer we ate, and sent the 
others to friends in town who kindly 
equipped us with horses, tents, etc. We 
could have killed 100 deer if we had cared 
to. It is common to see 30 or 40 deer a 
day in that country, which is 3 days' travel 
from here. 

I should like to take issue with some of 
the old-timers as to the sense of smell in 
deer. I wear moose hide moccasins and 
have walked up within 30 feet of deer lying 
down. They paid no attention until they 
saw me. Have had deer pass within 20 
feet of me. Of course that was when I 
was standing perfectly still ; the slightest 
movement would send them flying. If their 
sense of smell is so keen, how do you ac- 
count for my getting so near them? 

I have found them feeding at all hours. 
I have found them lying down at all hours. 
After 6 years' hunting here I know prac- 
tically nothing of their habits. My early 
ideas as to habits of deer have been ex- 
ploded. I believe they have the most acute 
ears of any animal extant. When lying 
down the ears are working back and forth 
all the time. Deer can see a leaf move 
40 rods away. I believe they depend almost 
entirely on hearing and sight for the detec- 
tion of an enemy. In getting away they 
will jump anything. I saw 2 go over a 
bank 40 feet high, and keep on going. 

C. H. Barry, M. D., Durango, Mex. 



GAME COMMISSION PROTECTS LAW 
BREAKERS. 

If W. B. W., of Schuylerville, N. Y., 
will furnish the correspondence he refers 
to as having passed between him and the 
Game Commission I will take charge of 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



119 



an investigation that will unearth the "nig- 
ger in the woodpile," and we can then rest 
assured there will be less politics than there 
now is in the Commission. I am working 
up a case against one of the wardens, and 
as I have had some experience in breaking 
up such rings I hope to succeed with this 
one. I have been through a section of 
the Adirondacks where still-hunting can 
not be carried on without snow, yet we 
read in every county paper of deer having 
been shot at this or that lake, or pond, 
and by women, too. We are expected to 
believe it was done legally. I have writ- 
ten the Commission one letter, and I am 
collecting evidence against a notorious lot 
of violators who se to be protected by 
the warden, for it is well known that they 
hunt openly, and wherever they wish to 
hunt ; that they buy, sell and trade, and 
that they exchange dogs with other parties 
who think immunity lies in not using the 
same dogs all the time. The breeding of 
fine deer dogs is as much of an industry 
as ever, and prices are as high as before 
protection was instituted. The protection 
given the deer is like the protection af- 
forded the public of New York city by 
the police, and a searching investigation 
would furnish some startling facts. The 
parties who hunt at Underwood, New 
pond, Clear pond, the Boreas waters, 
and Newcomb, are doing it illegally. The 
entire Southern section of the Adirondacks 
lacks efficiency in its force of wardens, and 
the practice of conducting a still-hunt 
when investigating a violation of the law 
is wrong in principle and effect. The pub- 
lic knows nothing of the results, and it is 
believed by many of the law-abiding resi- 
dents of the region that few convic- 
tions are ever obtained. If any are, .the 
fines are not divulged publicly, but you are 
led to believe that Mr. "A." had to pay a 
big fine ! It is such privacy that has led 
the people to believe the Commission is not 
doing its duty unless forced to do it, and 
then only reluctantly. 

Adirondack, North Granville, N. Y. 



A SHAMEFUL SLAUGHTER. 

BERKELEY.— The coating of oil on the 
waters of the bay which last week caused 
many ducks to fall into the hands of Alameda 
hunters in the vicinity of Bay Farm island, has 
drifted Northward to the West Berkeley shore. 
Numbers of ducks that have become entangled in 
the viscid fluid are being slaughtered by Berkeley 
boys. Carlisle Coey, Joseph Rose, William Con- 
nolly and P. Carcot killed 64 ducks with stones 
and clubs in one day near Sheep island. — San 
Francisco Chronicle. 

When the above clipping was sent me 
I wrote the persons mentioned, asking 
for their version of the affair. One of 
them answered as follows : 

J do not know the cause of it, but the 



waters of San Francisco bay are often 
covered with tar oil. Ducks while feeding 
become covered with the oil, and go to 
the beach to rid themselves of it. On the 
occasion mentioned Wm. Conley, Jas. Rose 
and I were fishing near Sheep island. 
Landing there, we found a number of 
ducks on the shore, picking and cleaning 
themselves. They were so dirty we could 
not tell what they were until we killed 2 
with clubs. When we found they were can- 
vasbacks we went around the island, kill- 
ing as many as we could with sticks and 
stones. None of the birds could fly, but 
many took to the water and escaped in 
that way. We got 64. 

Carlisle Coey, Berkeley, Cal. 

It is a great pity that some able bodied, 
fearless man did not happen along at that 
time to give you boys what you deserved. 
You should first have had a few good birch 
rods worn out on you. Then you should 
have been undressed, painted with a thick 
coat of tar oil with a heavy top-dressing of 
feathers from the ducks you slaughtered 
rubbed into it ; after which you should 
have been marched home through the prin- 
cipal streets of your town with placards 
on your backs, printed in large tyne, "Game 
Hogs." If you could have had such a visi- 
tation of justice as this and such an ex- 
posure to public gaze, you might possibly 
have realized the enormity of your offense. 
— Editor. 



A REVEREND GAME HOG. 

Enclosed is a clipping taken from our 
daily paper. This is what I call slaughter 
of the worst kind and each man should be 
fined $50 or a year in jail. 

B. B. R, Decatur, 111. 

Six hundred and ninety-two rabbits and 270 
quails were the result of one day's hunting around 
Lovington. The game will be served at a 
big supper for the benefit of the Christian 
Church, of which Rev. F. C. Overbaugh is the 
pastor. It is not expected that all this game 
will be eaten, but the rabbits that are left over 
will be sold and the quails will be given away, it 
being against the law to sell them now. 

The final arrangements for the contest were 
completed Monday. A. Hoots was selected cap- 
tain of one side and William Hefner the other. 
These captains selected 20 men, and they started 
in opposite directions. 

When the hunters returned to town the people 
were astonished at the success of their under- 
taking. The record follows: 

Heffler Party — 

Rabbits 363 

Quails 132 

Hoots Party — 

Rabbits 329 

Quails 138 

Total 962 

The HefHer party was victorious by a narrow 
margin of 16 points. It was the greatest hunt 
ever known in this section of the State. — Decatur 
(111.) Herald. 



120 



RECREATION. 



There is some excuse for ignorant, half 
civilized men like some of those in the 
rural districts who engage in side hunts, 
but what shall we say of a minister of 
the gospel who engineers one of these 
butchering contests? Rev. Overbaugh has 
disgraced his calling and has befouled his 
cloth with the filth of the worst type of 
game hog known to the world, the side 
hunter. — Editor. 



KILLED SPARROWS BY THE TON. 

Pana, 111., Jan. i. — The annual sparrow hunt 
of Pleasant township has ended, and as a result 3 
tons of sparrows were killed. The hunt was in- 
dulged in by 2 parties of farme'rs. Twenty men 
on each side engaged in the pursuit, the stake be- 
ing a banquet to be given by the party securing 
the fewest birds. The victorious party brought in 
13,000 birds, while the losers bagged 11,000, a to- 
tal of 24,000 sparrows. The birds averaged 4 
ounces each. The hunt was in progress one week. 

Such a side hunt ought to be productive 
of good results. The English sparrow is a 
filthy nuisance, and if he serves any useful 
end I have never discovered it, unless it be 
that he may be converted into food. I once 
cooped about 30 in a poultry house, where 
I fed them grain for 2 weeks. They were 
then killed, skinned and made into a pie. 
I have eaten many things much worse than 
that pie. The English sparrow besides de- 
stroying gardens and industriously filling 
up the eaves troughs, drives away nearly 
all other birds. It is perhaps impossible 
to exterminate them, but by carrying on a 
vigorous warfare they may be kept within 
bounds. F. C. Koons, Des Moines, la. 

I am opoosed to side hunts in general, 
but this kind is different, and I should be 
glad if such sparrow killing matches could 
be held everywhere. There is no close 
season on these birds, and every man who 
kills one of them contributes liberally to 
the welfare of the song and insectivorous 
birds. Why can not fellows who are so 
fond of slaughtering quails and ducks and 
prairie chickens satisfy a lot of their thirst 
for blood by shooting sparrows? Let us 
have more sparrow side hunts, by all 
means. — Editor. 



A VOICE FROM THE WILDERNESS. 

This nation is rapidly gaining wealth and 
greatness, and power on land and ocean. 
This is the time to establish a national game 
preserve in Southern Alaska, on the 
lines laid down by Mr. W. T. Hornaday in 
Recreation. It can be done if Congress 
so wills it, backed by an enlightened people. 
It is not a party measure; but all the de- 
scendants of this nation will be heirs to 
Nature's living creatures. There is a great 
army of little folk around us developing 



brain and brawn, who will be here when 
we are gone. We should work for the chil- 
dren of the future. 

Should the .forests be swept from the 
earth, the birds all exterminated; should 
there be no joyous bird songs to awaken 
the slumbers of a newborn day, no tracks 
of game on the pathless and dreary plain, 
life would not be worth living. 

" Well might the sun in darkness hide, 
And shut his glories in." 

Nature has labored for untold ages to 
bring forth all these glorious genera. 

England has set us a good example in 
building wagon roads, and in preservation 
of forests and game. Their mounted police 
in British Columbia are thorough and effi- 
cient, and are doing clean work. 

In many lines the average man has not 
advanced in intelligence since the ages when 
his weapons were the fire-hardened club, 
his skinning knife of jasper, and his ax of 
bronze or stone. Here in Idaho such men 
tell us they don't care how many laws are 
made to protect game and fish, they will kill 
all they can ! 

A. C. G. iblocum, Rathdrum, Idaho. 



SOME OHIO HOGS. 

Tiffin, Ohio. 
The largest and most remarkable catch of the 
present game season was made yesterday by Al. W. 
Franklin, of the Standard Oil Company, and C. H. 
Bradley, secretary of the tvtate Investment Com- 
pany, both Cleveland men. They were accompanied 
by the Geyer Bros., landlords of the Empire hotel, 
of this city. In less than 8 hours they bagged 175 
quails and 9 rabbits. — Toledo (O.) Blade. 

I wrote these fellows, and append an- 
swers from 2 . 

It is true that 3 of us bagged 175 quails 

in 8 hours, each man shooting over his 

own dog. A few days later my brother 

and I killed 105 quails in 8 hours hunting. 

Charles Geyer, Tiffin, O. 

You were correctly informed as to the 
number of quails secured in the men- 
tioned time. My comrades were Messrs. 
A. W. Franklin of Cleveland, and Chas. and 
Sam Geyer of Tiffin, Ohio. By the way, these 
men are veteran sportsmen and admirers 
of literature pertaining to same. 

C. H. Bradley, Cleveland, O. 

Bradley says "these men are veteran 
sportsmen and admirers of literature per- 
taining to same." He is entirely mistaken. 
They have no more sense of true sport than 
a cow has of music. They are simply low- 
down, uneducated butchers, and no true 
sportsman would be found in their com- 
pany, with gun and dog. It is safe 
to say that Recreation will not hereafter 
figure in the list of literature that they 
admire. — Editor, 



FROM THE GAME FIELDS. 



121 



THE MUSIC OF THE CHASE. 

In January Recreation 1 saw an article 
on coon hunting, by O. M. Arnold, which 
interested me exceedingly. 

Mr. Arnold says he never fancied hounds 
for this sport, as he found them too apt 
to run the back track. He also says, their 
power of discrimination is not good. I 
have had considerable experience with 
hounds in coon hunting and have found 
them satisfactory in every way. I do not 
believe a really good hound will run a 
back trail far. I have a pair of well bred 
foxhounds which are used exclusively for 
this sport, and their power of discrimi- 
nation is wonderful. 

The reason a coon in front of a hound, 
be the dog fast or slow, invariably takes 
a large tree is easily explained. The 
hound, as we all know, gives tongue freely. 
The coon hearing this, is enabled to keep 
his pursuer located ; and with that advan- 
tage, can usually select his route and judge 
his distance well. With a collie it is an 
entirely different matter. He follows the 
trail silently and does not yelp until he 
sights the coon. Thus the game is often 
taken unaware and makes for the nearest 
tree, be it large or small. One might 
possibly bag more game with a collie, but 
to us who love the music of the chase, 
give the hounds. 

Marcus A. Ide, Catonsville, Md. 



ducks any decent man may kill in a day to 
25 at the outside. — Editor. 



THE CANVASBACK KING. 

A subscriber having called my attention 
to the doings of Tilman Lewark, called by 
a local paper "the canvasback king of Co- 
rolla, N. C.," I wrote that person asking if 
it was true that he had killed 300 ducks in 
a day, as reported. He replied as follows : 

There is some mistake in the number of 
ducks I am reported to have killed ; but 
I have made some big bags in a short time. 
Once I killed 101 ducks with 117 shells, 
which were all I had with me. Another 
time I shot 140 ducks in a few hours. 
Shooting has been fine on Currituck sound 
this season. If there is other informa- 
tion I can furnished you, I shall be pleased 
to do so. 

Tilman Lewark, Corolla, N. C. 

It is not necessary that you should fur- 
nish me any further information. Your 
present letter convicts you of being a dis- 
reputable butcher, and it is because you 
and a lot of other swine have been per- 
mitted to carry on this kind of slaughter 
along the North Carolina coast for years 
past that the ducks and geese of the whole 
Eastern country are now nearing total ex- 
termination. I hope your Legislature will 
soon enact a law that will put such brutes 
as you in jail and limit the number of 



TWO MORE FROM NEW JERSEY. 
W. E. Horner, Jr., a game dealer, and Hansel 
Parker, both residents of Parkertown, N. J., said 
to be the best wing shots of that vicinity, recently 
killed 84 ycllowleg plover in one day's shout- 
ing. Old-time hunters believe this is the high 
record for 2 men in one day's hunt. — Exchange. 

To my inquiries as to the truth of above 
report I received the following replies: 

It is true we killed 84 large yellowleg 
plover in one day. If you care to insert it 
we will get up a nice piece about it for 
you to publish in your paper, and we will 
buy a number of copies. 

W. E. Horner, Jr., Parkertown, N. J. 

Yes, we 2 killed 113; 84 plovers and 29 
small birds. Please send me one of your 
papers. 

Hansel Parker, Parkertown, N. J. 

Thus you announce yourselves mem- 
bers of the great army of American game 
hogs. No decent man would have killed 
more than 15 of these birds in a day no 
matter how many he might have the chance 
to kill, and inasmuch as you have exceeded 
that number you have proclaimed your 
swinish proclivities. If after reading this 
you want a dozen copies of Recreation to 
distribute among your friends I will gladly 
send them to you free of charge. Never 
mind the ''piece." — Editor. 



PENNSYLVANIA INTERESTED. 
Though I have read Recreation but a 
short time, I realize that I can not afford 
to be without it. Your magazine is the 
best sportsmen's journal published, and I 
have read them all. I congratulate you on 
your good work for the protection of game, 
and note with ever increasing pleasure the 
interest manifested in your labors. Owing 
to mild and open winters, together with 
the growing disposition to enforce the 
game laws, I am pleased to be able to 
report a noticeable increase in the number 
of our game birds. The woodcock, how- 
ever, is gradually disappearing from the 
swamps where once good bags might be 
secured. This condition is probably the re- 
sult of the pernicious law permitting the 
killing of the birds in July. The Lycoming 
Sportsmen's Association of this county, 
organized less than a year ago, has al- 
ready secured the arrest and conviction of 
several persons charged with having deer 
in their possession over and beyond the 
15 days allowed by law, the fines amounting 
to $100 and costs, each, for the 4 or 5 indi- 
viduals concerned. We are further as- 
sured that something will be doing in 
this vicinity next fall. 

Ermin F. Hill, Hughesville, Pa. 



122 



RECREATION. 



A MARKET HUNTER WATCHED. 

In January Recreation I saw a letter 
written from Lakefield, Minn., by R. C. 
Darr. From its tone one might suppose 
Darr a genuine sportsman, but he is the 
worst game hog I ever ran across. He 
became a citizen of Minnesota to escape 
having to pay for a hunting license, and 
for several years slaughtered game birds 
for market. When the law prohibiting ex- 
port of game went into effect I heard him 
say, "What is the use of hunting now, 
when you can't get rid of the game?" 
Nevertheless, he continued hunting as be- 
fore, shot lots of chickens,' ducks, etc., and 
disposed of them in some mysterious way. 
A warrant was issued for his arrest for 
shipping game, but nothing came of it. 
Since then he has been closely watched. 
Abundant proof of these facts can be had. 
H. R. Heath, Aberdeen, S. Dak. 

Minnesota and all other States should 
enact laws prohibiting the sale of game at 
any time, even when killed within their 
limits. Several of them have already done 
this, and whenever the remaining States 
follow suit then the occupation of the mar- 
ket hunter will be gone, and the sooner 
the better. — Editor. 



THOROUGHLY NATURALIZED. 

When William Waldorf Astor was said to have 
bought Battle Abbey the English papers cruelly 
lacerated our feelings by calling him an Ameri- 
can. Although the charge was totally unfounded, 
the humiliation of it cut deep. 

But the most malicious Yankee hater on Fleet 
street will hardly venture to load us with Mr. 
Bradley Martin. Mr. Bradley Martin has been 
having that peculiarly British form of recreation 
known as a "shoot." We are informed that it 
was a huge success. 

"The sport was excellent. In 5 days' shooting 
5,504 head of game were slain, the best day yield- 
ing 1,236 pheasants and more than 1,000 rabbits." 

In Chicago, visitors are taken to the stock yards 
to see how fast experts can slaughter hogs, but 
that is not called sport; it is business. 

In California the farmers of a whole county 
sometimes have a rabbit drive, in which 20,000 
jack rabbits are herded into an inclosure and 
killed with clubs, but that is business, too, and, be- 
sides, the jack rabbits are wild. 

Anybody who turns his place into an abattoir, 
inviting his guests to perform the work of the 
hired butchers in the Chicago stock yards on 
5,000 tame pheasants and rabbits is forever pro- 
tected against the charge that he is an American. 
— Chicago American. 

Even a yellow journalist like Mr. Hearst 
shudders when he reads an account of the 
principles of some of our American game 
hogs. — Editor. 

PAID HIGH FOR VENISON. 

Dr. Charles Bastian and Zack Clark, well- 
known hunters of Salladasburg, were arrested this 
morning, and pleaded guilty to killing deer out ot 
season. For their illegal act Alderman Kellenbach 
fined them $200 and costs, which in all amounted 
to $232.60. — Williamsport (Pa.) Sun. 

The Lycoming Sportsmen'? Association 



is only 9 months old, but already we have 
secured 2 convictions for violation of game 
laws. The first case cost the culprit $70 
for 2 rabbits killed out of season. The 
second case is the one mentioned in the 
clipping. We mean business and poachers 
in Lycoming county are now up against 
the "real thing." 

W. W. Ahmbosh, Williamsport, Pa. 

Another case in which venison proves 
high living. Dr. Bastian and Mr. Clark 
could have bought beef enough for $232.60 
to last both of their families a whole year. 
They will probably be perfectly satisfied 
with good domestic meat in future. — 
Editor. 



TOO MANY QUAILS. 

Offerman, Ga. — J. C. Brewer, of Waycross, J. 
H. Bynum, of Offerman, and H. G. Williams, of 
Liberty City, went shooting here to-day and re- 
turne dwith 286 quails. They had Mr. Brewer's 2 
dogs from Waycross. — Savannah (Ga.) News. 

To my inquiry regarding the truth of 
above report the following reply was made : 

There was an error made by the reporter 
in stating that 2 friends and I killed 286 
quails in one day. We bagged 106.' Of 
course we killed a good many that were 
left on the ground. We expect to take an- 
other hunt soon, and I will advise you of 
results, if desired. 

J. H. Bynum, Offerman, Ga. 

That was twice as many as you should 
have killed. If you had been reading up- 
to-date sportsmen's literature the past few 
years you would have known that all gen- 
tlemen who shoot quails quit, nowadays, 
when they get 10 to 15. — Editor. 



DOVE KILLING IN GEORGIA. 

There was a lively contest at shooting doves by 
Moultrie sports Wednesday morning. Two 
parties went out to different plantations and strove 
for the largest number of birds. One party went 
down to Mr. George Suber's plantation, near 
Suberdale. They were joined in their shoot by 
Mr. Suber and other local sportsmen. They found 
doves in sufficiently large numbers to begin 
with, but after 2 hours' shooting the birds left the 
fields. The men killed between 350 and 400. An- 
other party went down to Murphy and engaged 
in a big shoot on the Murphy plantations. The 
shooting was lively here, also, but lasted only a 
short while. This party bagged about 300. The 
sportsmen claimed it was not a good day for 
snooting doves. — Moultrie (Ga.) Observer. 

The editor of the Observer should learn 
to call things by their right names. When 
he applies the term sportsmen to such con- 
temptible game hogs as these, he insults 
every real sportsman in the country. This 
editor should read Recreation and learn 
something of modern English before he 
undertakes to report another side hunt. 



FROM the game fields". 



123 



GAME NOTES; 
The county of Digby, Western Nova Sco- 
tia, is not exactly a poachers' paradise. 
Major John Daley and Edmund Jenner, 
agents for the Game Society of Nova Sco- 
tia, have been after the poaching fraternity. 
January 9th, a fine moose carcass was 
seized, condemned as contraband, and 
sent to the county poorhouse. January 
22d, Agent Daley received word that Abram 
Ivney, an Indian, was on his way to Digby 
with moose meat illicitly killed. While 
Major Daley was overhauling the freight 
consigned to St. John, N. B., Agent Jenner 
took a look around the town, and dis- 
covered Ivney with a bag of fresh moose 
meat. The magistrate considered that 30 
days in jail would be about the correct 
thing and Abram is now enjoying it. 
January 25th a hotel keeper was fined for 
having bought moose meat in close season. 
E. Jenner, Digby, N. S. 



Quails, grouse, ducks and deer are much 
more plentiful here than they were 3 years 
ago, showing the good result of stringent 
game laws. There can, however, occasion- 
ally be found an editor, too indolent or 
too poor a shot to bag any game for him- 
self, who bewails the absence of an oppor- 
tunity to laud pot hunters. To that sort of 
editor the game laws of Wisconsin seem 
a farce and a scheme of the city-bred fel- 
low and the rich to corner the hunting and 
fishing. No one who ever carried a rod or 
a gun with any regard for the future sup- 
ply of game takes any stock in this editor's 
wrong theories, and the good work goes on. 
Sportsmen see more and more the need of 
laws for game protection, and will con- 
tinue to work for their further enactment. 
T. W. Borum, Barron, Wis. 



What kind of game can be found in the 
vicinity of Jennings, Calcasieu county, 
Louisiana? R. M. K., Chicago, 111. 

ANSWER. 

Along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, 
from New Orleans to Galveston, Texas, 
quails and gray squirrels can be found. 
Between New Orleans and Orange, Texas, 
can be found snipe and all kinds of ducks, 
more especially between La Fayette and 
Orange, where the rice fields offer them 
rich food throughout the year. Between 
New Orleans and the Texas line are vast 
swamps, or marshes, where many black 
bear and deer are hunted and killed every 
season. Fish and oysters of all kinds are 
plentiful in that territory. — Editor. 



In your battle with the fish and game 
hogs do not get discouraged. You are put- 
ting up a fight in which you have the best 
element of the nation with you, and one 



which will leave youf name in honor long 
after you and I are gone. Coarse, selfish 
men have to be roughly dealt with. Her- 
cules had to club down the heads of the 
hydra and then have his servant sear them 
with a hot iron to keep them from sprout- 
ing again. This kind will not sprout ; they 
will hide, and another generation will not 
know them. The lowest class of men 1 
have ever met are those who shoot for the 
market. Boone, Lewiston, N. Y. 



In printing one of my letters in May 
Recreation you credit me with saying that 
meadow larks are "larger and more diffi- 
cult of approach late in the season than 
any of our game birds." This is an error. 
The word "many" should take the place of 
the word "any." Kindly correct this or I 
shall have to undergo a medical examina- 
tion as to my sanity. 

A. L. Owen, Keating Summit, Pa. 

Squirrels, rabbits and quails are plentiful 
here. A few pheasants have been turned 
loose in our part of the country, but their 
increase has been retarded by the hard win- 
ters we have had the past 3 years. 

G. L. Linkhart, Pt. Williams, O. 



My home is in a good country for hunt- 
ing and fishing. Our duck shooting is es- 
pecially good. Should like to learn where 
I can find good prairie chicken shooting. 
C. M. Palmer, Madison, Wis. 



Red foxes are abundant in this vicinity. 
More than 20 were shot in Jefferson town- 
ship during the first 2 months of the sea- 
son. E. O. Wickersham, Zanesfield, O. 



We had plenty of small game last sea- 
son. Quails were more abundant than for 
years before. 

J. N. Dodd, County Line, la. 



Quails wintered well and are abundant. 
We shall certainly have fine sport here 
this fall. 

H. J. Duke, Shippensburg, Pa. 



Two men went about 15 miles East of 
here and shot 63 rabbits and 88 quails in 
one day. C. G. Fisher, Piqua, O. 



Quails got through the winter nicely; if 
nothing happens, they will be thick next 
fall. J. H. Crist, Covina, Cal. 



Quails were unusually plentiful last fall 
for this place, and wintered well. 

J. Dickson, Durham, N. H. 



FISH AND FISHING. 



ALMANAC FOR SALT WATER FISHERMEN. 

The following will be found accurate and val- 
uable for the vicinity of New York City: 

Kinghsh — Barb, Sea-Mink, Whiting. June to 
September. Haunts: The surf and deep channels 
of strong tide streams. Baits: Blood worms, 
shedder crabs and beach crustaceans. Time and 
tide: Flood, early morning. 

Plaice — Fluke, Turbot, Flounder. May 15 to 
November 30. Haunts: The surf, mouth of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, killi-hsh, sand 
laut. Time and tide: Ebb, daytime exclusively. 

Spanish mackerel — Haunts: The open sea, July 
to September. Baits: Menhaden, trolling — metal 
and cedar squids. 

Striped Bass — Rock Fish, Green Flead. April to 
November. Haunts: The surf, bays, estuaries and 
tidal streams. Baits: Blood worms, shedder crabs, 
Calico crabs, small eels, menhaden. Time and 
tide. Night, half flood to flood, to half ebb. 

The Drums, Red and Black. June to Novem- 
ber. Haunts: The surf and mouths of large bays. 
Bait : Skinner crab. Time and tide : Da}', flood. 

Blacklish — Tautog, April to November. Haunts: 
Surf, vicinity of piling and old wrecks in bays. 
Baits: Sand worm, blood worm, shedder crabs, 
clams. Time and tide: Daytime , flood. 

Lafayette — Spot, Goody, Cape May Goody. 
August to October. Haunts: Channels of tidal 
streams. Baits: Shedder crabs, sand worms, clams. 
Time and Tide : Day and night flood. 

Croker — July to October. Haunts: Deep chan- 
nels of bays. Baits: Shedder crabs, mussels. 
Time and tide: Day flood. 

Snapper — Young of Blue Fish. August to No- 
vember. Haunts: Rivers and all tide ways. Baits: 
Spearing and menhaden; trolling pearl squid. 
Time and tide: Day, all tides. 

Sheepshead — June to October Haunts: Surf 
and bays, vicinity of old wrecks. Baits: Clams, 
mussels, shedder crabs. Time and tide: Day, 
flood only. 

New England Whiting — Winter Weak-fish, 
Frost-fish. November to May. Haunts: The 
surf. Baits: Sand laut, spearing. Time and tide: 
Night, flood. 

Hake — Ling. October to June. Haunts: Open 
sea surf, large bays. Baits: Clams, mussels, fish. 
Time and tide: Day and night, flood. 

Weak-fish — Squeteague, Squit. June to October. 
Haunts: Surf, all tideways. Baits: Shedder 
crabs, surf mullet, menhaden, ledge mussels, sand 
laut, shrimp. Time and tide: Day and night, 
flood preferred. 

Blue Fish — Horse Mackerel. June to November 
1 st. Haunts: Surf, open sea and large bays. 
Baits: Menhaden, surf mullet and trolling squid. 
Time and tide: Daytime; not affected by tides. 



ANGLING ON SNAKE RIVER. 

Lewiston, Ida. 
Editor Recreation : 

Of all fresh water fishes none affords the 
angler more royal sport than does the 
Columbia river salmon. Its size, cunning-, 
vitality and courage have made it the most 
famous of game fishes. 

The most generally known species is the 
Chinook, although there are several other 
varieties in this river; for instance, the 
steelhead, the blueback, and the dog 
salmon. All enter the Columbia from the 
ocean twice during the year, in early 
spring and in fall. Those fish mat are suc- 
cessful in passing the many thousand nets 
and fish wheels which line both banks of 



the river for many miles, keep on up 
stream, becoming more wary as they ad- 
vance. Though they breast the rapid cur- 
rent of a rough, rocky river in their long 
journey to the headwaters or spawning- 
grounds, they take no food after leaving 
the salt water. Nevertheless, they are 
generally fat and in good condition when 
caught. 

Only one of the species mentioned, the 
steelhead, will take a hook, annd then only 
when it is baited with salmon spawn. This 
fish is as fine as any and weighs 10 to 35 
pounds. 

Even when the fish is well hooked, a lone 
angler can rarely land it, consequently he 
needs a companion. It is usually a waste 
of time to try for the steelhead before the 
first freeze-up. The lower and colder the 
water the better salmon take bait, and if 
there is floating ice the chance of success 
is increased. If an angler drags the river 
a mile every day for a week without land- 
ing a salmon, he need not despair. Hin 
time will come when the school comes, and 
then the fun begins. 

About 160 miles above the mouth 
of the crooked, rocky Snake river, a 
tributary of the Columbia, there stands on 
a large sand bar 30 feet above low water 
mark, the city of Lewiston, Idaho. A mile 
above the city, where deep water runs 
slowly around a rapid, is a favorite 
fishing ground. There, during January 
and February, may always be found 
a number of boats, floating with the 
current over the pool. In each boat 
will be 3 or 4 men, all but one armed with 
20-foot bamboo poles, large 100-yard lines 
and reels. One man must stay by the oars, 
keeping the boat headed up stream and 
ready to stop it if a hook is snagged. 
When a strike is made there is a pull, a 
swish, and the salmon leaps 10 feet in air, 
the line cutting the water like a knife. The 
oarsman makes for the shore ; the angler 
holds his pole straight and his line taut. 
The fish lashes the water into foam. 
Gradually he tires, and little bv little is 
coaxed nearer shore. The oarsman takes 
the gaff and leans over the gunwale to 
strike ; often only to frighten the steelhead 
into another and successful rush for liberty. 

A new lead sinker of about 4 ounces in 
weight, with swivel, is attached to the end 
of the broken line. Also, a 3-foot, 4-ply 
gut leader, and a quadruple-snelled tarpon 
hook, on which an ounce of spawn is care- 
fully but loosely wrapped with silk thread. 
The boat is rowed to the head of the pool 
again for a new start. If fish are biting 
well a new strike is soon made, and there 
follows a tug, a swish, the same character- 



124 



FISH AND FISHING, 



125 



istic leap, splash and run. The fish is 
gradually brought alongside after the boat 
is at the shore. The gaffsman strikes and 
the quarry is landed. W. E. Bramel. 



FISH SUFFER LITTLE. 

I have fished ever since I can remember, 
without thinking how much suffering is 
caused by using live bait. Last summer, as 
I was going with a bucket of minnows to 
fish, a man spoke to me and showed me so 
plainly the suffering it would cause that 
when I got to the river I emptied my 
bucket and said I would never again use 
live bait. Would it be possible for the 
S. P. C. A. to stop the use of live 
bait ? Why have they not done so ? 

Persons making their own flies will find 
that the hair of a ground hog, or wood- 
chuck, as they are called, is excellent to use 
instead of feathers. In can be colored, if de- 
sired. 

Another thing I have used with success 
is a pork rind minnow. Catch a live min- 
now, skin it carefully by splitting- down 
the underside, stretch the skin carefully 
over the pork rind and you will have a 
minnow that will fool any fish, though it 
takes lots of pains to make one nicely. This 
is a good thing, especially for crappies. 

John A. Cooper, Delaware, unio. 

You are mistaken in thinking it cruel 
to hook a minnow, a frog or a fish. It 
has been clearly demonstrated by scientists 
that these lower orders have little sense of 
pain. There are hundreds of authentic rec- 
ords of fish having been hooked; having 
broken the line or leader; and after a 
few minutes or a few hours the same fish 
having taken another bait or fly ; and 
when taken from the water the first hook 
has been found firmly imbedded in the iaw 
with the piece of line or leader attached. 
There is one case on record of a perch hav- 
ing been hooked, and of the hook having 
passed through its eye. When the fish 
was taken from the hook the eye was pulled 
out and hung on the hook, the fish, which 
was small and worthless, being returned to 
the water. The angler, realizing that this 
would probably make a good bait, cast 
again with no other bait than the perch's 
eye. Within a few minutes he had a bite, 
pulled up and landed the one-eyed perch 
he had lately taken from his own hook. 
This proves conclusively that this fish felt 
little or no pain at the loss of an eye. 
Nearly all old anglers have had similar ex- 
periences. — Editor. 



muskalonge fry at a fair price. What 
would you consider a fair price per 1,000, 
delivered. I should have to start on a 
limited scale. 

H. R. Field, Indian River, Mich. 

ANSWER. 

The New York State Fish Commission 
has for some years been hatching muska- 
longe in large numbers at Chautauqua lake. 
The Wisconsin Fish Commission has also 
done something with the muskalonge. As the 
various State Fish Commissions are in the 
habit of furnishing fry and eggs to one an- 
other and to people of their respective 
States who wish to stock private or semi- 
public waters, it is not certain but they will 
be able to fully supply the demand. 
Whether a private hatchery would prove a 
financial success is a question. However, 
the expense of equipping and operating 
such a hatchery would not be great and the 
experiment is well worth trying. 

Information regarding the muskalonge 
may be found in the following : The vari- 
ous recent reports of the New York Fish 
Commission; report of the Wisconsin Fish 
Commission for 1899-1900; The Fish Cul- 
tural Manual, published by the U. S. Fish 
Commission, which may be obtained by 
applying to your Congressman ; and "Notes 
on the Fishes of Lake Chautauqua," which 
may be had by addressing the U. S. Fish 
Commissioner, at Washington. — Editor. 



MUSKALONGE HATCHING. 
As I intend to start a muskalonge hatch- 
ery here, if it is possible, I should con- 
sider it a favor if you would tell me what 
you think my chances would be for selling 



WHAT WILL THESE TROUT TAKE? 

The last 2 springs I have succeeded in 
taking from a small lake in Delaware 
county, this State, brook trout weighing 
one to 2 l / 2 pounds each. While this fact 
may not be unusual, the circumstances con- 
nected with trout fishing at this particular 
place are. The ice leaves, or melts, about the 
time the trout season opens, and for a week 
or less thereafter trout may be caught with 
bait. After that time no one has succeeded 
in capturing more than one small 
trout, and then only occasionally. After a 
month, however, none are caught. An- 
glers have tried numberless schemes to 
take trout during the later season, but have 
not succeeded. Can you or some of the 
readers of your magazine suggest some 
way to overcome this difficulty? When I 
was there last spring the natives were dis- 
cussing the feasibility of stocking the lake 
with bass. That, in my opinion, would 
mean extermination of the trout. If some 
means could be found for catching the 
trout later in the season, probably no such 
plan would be carried out. 

A. D. D., Binghamton, N. Y. 

STOCK WITH NATIVE FISH. 

Our Fish and Game Club wishes to re- 
stock a small inland pond near here, having 



126 



RECREATION. 



marsy lily pads, muck bottom and shores, 
with a little clay at one end, and now con- 
taining speckled large and small mouth 
black bass. Can you give us any informa- 
tion as to what fish would be best to put 
in this pond ; also what varieties of salt 
water fish can be best propagated m such 
a pond? 

C. E. Trory, Hudson, Ohio. 

ANSWER. 

The fish already in the pond are the 
best that could be put in it. Salt water fish 
will not live in fresh water ponds. The 
best thing to do is protect carefully the 2 
species of black bass already in the pond, 
if at any time fish are desired to restock 
the pond apply to the U. S. Fish Commis- 
sion, forwarding the application through 
your member of Congress. — Editor. 



NIBBLES. 
The past season found game in the Puget 
Sound country none too plentiful, which 
leads me to believe that the game laws 
need revising. Ducks were especially 
scarce, due, some claim, to the mild, open 
winter. The open season on ducks and 
other water fowl is from August 15th to 
March. If it were made September 1st to 
January 31st, hunters would get better 
shooting, and the birds would not be so 
wild. There was no ooen season on quail 
the past 3 years up to October 15th last. 
But they, too, need careful consideration 
from the Legislature. Some good work 
has already been done, no game being al- 
lowed to be sold, except water fowl, dur- 
ing October, to the number of 10. A license 
fee of $1 is charged in each county. As to 
trout fishing, Washington can boast of as 
many and as fine trout streams and lakes as 
any State. 

R. A. Leeman, Seattle, Wash. 



A minnow has lately appeared in our 
lakes, and I am unable to learn its name. 
When alive and fresh they are entirely 
transparent. Can you inform me what 
they are? 

John W. Zimmerman, Cosperville, Ind. 

ANSWER. 

This little fish is the skipjack, Labides- 
thes sicculus, an abundant species in all the 
small lakes of Northern Indiana. It 
usually swims in large schools and always 
near the surface. On sunny, quiet days in 
fall and early winter they may be seen in 
great numbers near the shore. It is a 
delicate little fish, dying quickly, and is of 
little value as bait. It is our only fresh 
water member of the Atherinidae, or silver- 
sides, a large family of small salt water 
fishes. — Editor. 



One cloudy day in April Howard Wool- 
verton, Lansing Callan and I rowed up 
the creek which runs through the fields 
and woods near Valatie. After we had 
gone some distance our boat ran againsc 
something in the middle of the creek. We 
backed off with the oars and found the ob- 
stacle to be a stake in the middle of the 
stream. On looking farther we saw 2 simi- 
lar stakes, and when we looked down into 
the water we saw a net stretched across 
from one side of the creek to the other. 
We knew this was in violation of the fish 
laws, so we pulled up the stakes and threw 
the net on the bank. We all try to live up 
to the game and fish laws. 

Kenneth E. Bender, Albany, N. Y. 



In . an issue of Recreation last fall I 
spoke of the excellent black bass fishing in 
the Delaware river. Since then I have 
received a number of letters asking for 
further information as to location of best 
fishing spots, distance of river from New 
York, etc. Generally no stamp for reply 
has been enclosed. If anyone interested in 
angling for this gamy fish in waters afford- 
ing good sport, near New York and Phila- 
delphia, will enclose stamp I will be pleased 
to answer all inquiries promptly, give full 
directions how to reach these black bass 
grounds, and all information necessary to 
make a successful fishing trip at scarcely 
any expense. 

M. L. Michael, North Water Gap, Pa. 



Baldwin, Mich. — Andrew Johnson, of Luther, 
was brought to the county jail to serve 30 days 
for violating the fish law. Under-Sheriff Filio 
saw the man draw lines which had been set 
through the ice in the mill pond and take fish 
therefrom. When Johnson returned to the village 
Filio placed him under arrest. The man denied 
the charge and made a resistance which would 
have terminated .in his escape had not help ar- 
rived. Johnson was handcuffed and taken to the 
prosecuting attorney's office, where 2 trout were 
found in his pocket, which he claimed were perch. 
— Detroit Free Press. 

By the time Andrew Johnson gets out of 
jail he will probably conclude that it does 
not pay to violate the law even for the 
sake of getting a few pounds of trout to 
sell. — Editor. 



Why will the bass not bite in Higgins 
lake, Roscommon county, Mich. ? We have 
tried every way known, but have never been 
able to catch a bass. There is no doubt 
of their being there, as I have seen the na- 
tives spear any number of them, but that 
is not my way of fishing. The lake is 9 
miles long, s l / 2 wide, and over 100 feet 
deep. The water is so clear that the fish 
can be seen at a depth of 25 feet. 

Wallace Schaum, Hartford City, Ind. 

Can anyone answer? — Editor, 



FISH AND FISHING. 



127 



Trout can be seen by thousands, as they 
are still in schools. If you were here I 
could show you a sight that would gladden 
the heart of any sportsman, and that is a 
bunch of trout within 100 yards of town. 
There are at least 5,000 in the bunch, 
ranging in length from 8 to 13 inches. 
None were caught there during the close 
season. 

A. L. Smith, Kingston, Idaho. 



Edward Swanson, John Smith and J. Johnson 
were fined $80, $130 and $110, respectively, by 
Justice Palen, at Smethport, Tuesday, on a charge 
of catching trout that were under size. The men 
were fined the limit, $10 for each trout caught, and 
in default of the money will be required to serve 
a day in the county jail for each dollar imposed 
by the justice. It is said that the various trout 
streams in the county will be closely watched dur- 
ing the present season, and that legal proceedings 
will be instituted against all violators of the fish- 
ing laws.- — Bradford (Pa.) Era. 



I see that in June Recreation Mr. George 
Parnell, of Philadelphia, asks for informa- 
tion in regard to good black bass fishing 
within 80 miles of Philadelphia. If Mr. 
Parnell will let me know his postoffice ad- 
dress I will give him the information he 
seeks. 

M. L. Michael, North Water Gap, Pa. 



Fishing is good here. A native named 
Howe was fishing in McDonald creek in 
April and caught 6 rainbow trout weighing 
12 pounds. The largest weighed 3^2 
pounds, and was 20 inches long. I saw 
many of these trout, but that was the larg- 
est. Frank Liebig, Belton, Mont. 



I should like some reader of Recreation 
to give me some information about the 
fishing along the coast South of Tampa, 
Florida, the best place and time to fish, the 
kind of fish, tackle, etc. Any information 
will be appreciated. 

C. S. Perry, Menlo, Ga. 



Will you or some of your readers kindly 
tell me if it is feasible to cover a clinker- 
built boat with canvas, and, if so, how to 
do it. 

Recreation is the best sportsman's peri- 
odical extant. 

Gaylord T. Young, Cannonsburg, Mich. 



Mr. H. C. Wurtsbaugh, Richmond, Ohio, 
will find good fishing in the Muskingum 
river, about 45 miles East of Columbus, in 
Coshocton and Muskingum counties. 

H. H. Deane, Mingo Junction, Ohio, 

Will some of the readers of Recreation 
tell of their experience with automatic 
reels? I wish to buy one and want only 
the best. 

L. C. Hughes, New Castle, Pa. 



THROUGH THE BRUSH. 

MRS. J. L. BROCKWAY. 

About 8 years ago my husband and I 
took up a homestead claim in Routt county, 
about 14 miles from Steamboat Springs, 
the well known summer resort. At that 
time deer were abundant in those parts. 
Elk also could be found frequently, and 
occasionally small bands of antelope, feed- 
ing in the little parks among the hills. In 
one of these parks I saw a deer feeding one 
evening when I was out on my first hunting 
trip. It was a large 4-point buck, but too 
far away for me to be certain of killing 
him. I decided to follow a small stream 
down until I should get within closer 
range. 

Moving cautiously and keeping myself 
hidden behind the thick willows that grew 
along the stream, I crept carefully along 
until I was within easy range of him. I 
then stepped softly out from behind a large 
willow to take aim at my deer, but just 
at that moment he scented me. With his 
fine antlers thrown high in the air he gave 
one graceful bound and was off. For an 
instant my heart sank, but as I watched 
him disappear in a grove of aspens, I 
started on again, that time following a 
small gulch until I came to the top of a 
low ridge. The brush was high and the 
aspens were thick. As I stopped to look 
and listen, I saw what I thought was a 
deer, peering through the trees and brush 
at me. I stood quiet a moment until I 
saw one ear move. Then I raised my 
rifle and took steady aim at the only spot 
I could see clearly. I pulled the trigger ; 
then in another instant I was at the deer's 
side. He was a large 2-point buck and I 
had shot him squarely in the middle of the 
forehead. 

Then came the task of dressing my prize. 
It was not to my liking, but I saw no way 
out of it. I started my work, but at that 
moment my husband, having heard the 
shot, came to my rescue. 



EVOLUTION. 

W. B. CLARK. 

Tad-pole, tad-pole, 

Nothing to do but eat ! 
Wait, I pray, a little, 

You'll see his lively f«et. 

Pollywog, pollywog, 

Tail, but not a wuag! 
Wait until his tail is gone, 

Now, listen to him sing ! 

"Cr-erG-a-k !" But, Oh ! a fisherman 

Has him on a hook! 
Splash ! And now a pretty bass 

I§ ready for the cooh 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



Anybody can keep shooting all day, but -it takes a gentleman to quit when he gets enough. 



THE GUNMAKERS AND THE PICTURE 
BOOK. 

Once there were several rich men, who 
lived in town when it was nice weather. 
These men liked to have something going 
on, so they made guns and things. In an- 
other town there lived a plain chap, who 
published a picture book called Recrea- 
tion. The book also contained lots of 
stories, and was printed for the benefit of 
sportsmen and all others who could appre- 
ciate a good thing. For a long time the 
rich men advertised their wares in this pic- 
ture book; then all of a sudden they got 
mad and quit. And this is the way it hap- 
pened : One day a misguided sportsman, 
who didn't know it was loaded, wrote to 
the editor of the picture book, and said 
that the ramrod of the Snarlin rifle was 
no good, and that the gun leaked cart- 
ridges. Now this was quite true, and more 
than 27 other sportsmen knew it. Well, 
the editor published this letter. He had to, 
you see ; for all good sportsmen have a 
right to say things in their picture book. 

But did Snarlin thereafter equip his rifle 
with a better ramrod, and did he fix up 
the leaky places in the gun? No, he just 
got up on his hind legs, and used bad lan- 
guage. He told the editor of the picture 
book to stop the Snarlin ad right off 
quick. He said he would advertise his 
guns on the fences and on big stones along 
the country roads before he would longer 
patronize such a rank outfit as the picture 
book. He also said he wouldn't play 
shinny in the print-shop yard any more. 
But the editor only said, "All right, Hank; 
just fly your kite as quick as you want to, 
and keep going Southwest by North till 
you get home." Then Snarlin went to his 
shack, and got up a little yellow almanac, 
which said that the editor of the picture 
book was a humbug of the first water. 
These almanacs Snarlin gave away by the 
wagon load, and the country boys were 
glad of it. They used the little yellow 
books for gun wadding, and to smoke out 
woodchucks. 

Did the editor of the picture book tear 
his hair and fall in a fit over what the gun 
man said? Well hardly! He just said 
in a loud voice to the sportsmen every- 
where, "Come on, boys !" and the boys 
came on a-flying, and subscribed by thou- 
sands for the picture book. This boosted 
business so that the editor had to rent an- 
other typewriter and hire an extra hand to 
help work the printing press. The picture 
book became more popular than ever, and 
the gun man said he'd be essentially cussed 



if he could see why it was. Then he got 
mad again, and printed another almanac. 
This last almanac contained a whole lot of 
language, and the small boys used it to 
smoke out more woodchucks. 

Well, things ran along all right for a 
while, and the world didn't come to an end 
at all. The picture book circulated all over 
the country. It also went to lots of places 
away from home. Folks said it was a 
hummer. Then one day a sportsman wrote 
the editor as follows: "Dear Sir.: I was 
out shooting a week ago last fall, and 
wishing to load my gun, I put my hand 
into my pocket for some Skeeters shells, 
but found I had left my ammunition at 
home, so the cartridges were no good for 
my gun that day." The editor published 
the forgetful man's story, and Skeeters 
stopped advertising in the picture book, 
saying that he just wouldn't stand it to 
have his cartridges run down in that way. 
Again the editor said. "Come on, boys !" 
and again the boys came on with lots of 
subscriptions. 

And yet once more a sportsman wrote a 
letter saying that he had intended to buy 
a Weevens rifle, but failing to find the 
Weevens ad in the last issue of his picture 
book, he had purchased a different breed 
of rifle, and had found it all right. Then 
a Mr. Rage, who works in the Weevens 
foundry, laid down his shovel, took his pipe 
out of his mouth, and said a lot of cross 
words to everybody in sight. Those were 
busy times all around. 

For a third time the editor called to the 
boys to come on, and this time they came 
on so fast that he had to buy a new book 
in which to write down all their names. 
The picture book boomed as it had never 
done before. Everybody wanted it. This 
was pretty tough on Snarlin, Skeeters, 
Weevens & Co., and they just stood around 
and made faces at the sky. Then they 
cussed some more, and wished the pigs 
had eaten them when they were small. 

Moral : When a man starts in to do up 
a picture book, he wants to be sure that 
the publication has no backing. 

A. L. Vermilya, Columbiaville, Mich. 



COMMEND THE 20 GAUGE. 

In reply to E. C. Statler and others : I 
have a Lefever ejector 20 gauge which I 
used last season. Its light weight and 
slight recoil make it a most desirable gun 
for upland shooting. A gun 6*4 pounds in 
weight can be carried all day without fa- 



128 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



129 



tigue. The barrels are 28 inches. Right, 
modified; left, full choke. Load, 2 l / 4 drams 
Shultze and -)4 ounce Nos. 6 or 7 shot. 
With such a gun quails or grouse may be 
shot at 20 to 40 yards without being cut to 
pieces, as often happens with a full choke 
12 gauge. The 20 gauge seems just as ef- 
fective as a 12 gauge. The lighter gun ap- 
pears to have the best of it in the brush, 
while the 12 gauge, with its closer pattern, 
gives more time for deliberate shots in the 
open. The 20, with % ounce of shot, gives 
good results at target thrown from a Ma- 
gan trap. I see the Remington people ad- 
vertise 24 and 28 gauge guns. These 
should be nice, light little guns, but would 
have to be held near the right spot, as the 
spread of shot would be still more limited 
than with the 20 gauge. F. C. King says 
he loads his 16 gauge with 7 /s ounce of No. 
1 shot and kills woodcock at 40 to 55 yards. 
When I used a 16 I loaded with one ounce 
of No. 7 or 8 shot for woodcock and snipe. 
Hewlin, Shamokin, Pa. 

E. C. Statler wishes to hear from sports- 
men who have used 20 and 28 gauge guns. 
I have used the different gauges from 10 to 
44, and find a 20, 24, 28 or even 44 effective 
for squirrels, grouse, quails, rabbits and 
woodcock. I think it better to have them 
cylinder bored. I am using a 44 gauge 
now, and have killed with it rabbits at a 
distance of 6 rods. 1 use a brass shell 
loaded with 2 drams black powder and J /2 
ounce No. 8 shot, and can kill a bird, squir- 
rel or rabbit 5 or even 6 rods nearly every 
time. I like the 24 and 28 gauge better, as 
with them I can use paper shells and ni- 
tro powder. Parker Bros., who advertise in 
Recreation, manufacture guns as small as 
28 gauge, and they are beautiful arms. The 
Lefevre Arms Company makes guns of 20 
gauge and larger. I have been a reader of 
Recreation 5 years, and regard it as the 
best sportsmen's journal published. It is 
doing wonders for the preservation of our 
game. 

Dr. E. F. Preston, Ticonderoga, N. Y. 

Tell E. C. Statler, Grand Island, Neb., 
and G. C. G., Indian Head, N. W. T., that 
I have as a knockabout gun an Acme Dav- 
enport 20 gauge. They are advertised in 
Recreation. Our expert gunsmith, Dan 
Gerhart, put an old fashioned egg-choke 
in the barrel. This improvement has made 
the gun a powerful little arm. At the trap 
I have done 80 per cent shooting on blue 
rock targets at 12 yards rise. Use Win- 
chester repeater shells, with No. 6 primers, 
2% drams of DuPont smokeless powder 
and y% ounce No. 7V2 chilled shot. In the 
field use £4 ounce of No. 8 chilled shot. 
M. L. Herbein, Reading, Pa, 



THE MERITS OF SEMI-SMOKELESS. 

For the sake of Brother Stubb, of Oswell, 
Ohio, and others, 1 want to answer his 
question in January Recreation, regarding 
semi-smokeless. 

Our Mr. Wordcn won the King tourna- 
ment trophy last February, with a score 
of 25 straight, at Blue Rock targets, un- 
known angle, using 2^ drams of semi- 
smokeless in brass shells. He made the 
only straight score, and was the only man 
using semi-smokeless exclusively. The 
boys here are well pleased with semi- 
smokeless for trap and field use. It is a 
sulendid load at a moderate price; and as 
a rifle powder our experts consider it un- 
equaled. As a result of repeated tests, 
would say that ffffg. is best for trap work 
at targets, as it is quickest. The fffg. 
is better for field work, for though a trifle 
slower, it is a harder hitting load at long 
range. 

Always use black powder nrimers with 
it, as nitro primers set it off too quickly, 
causing excessive recoil. Semi-smokeless 
appreciates good thick elastic wadding, and 
nlenty of it ; though it can be used success- 
fully if wadded as you wad for black pow- 
der. Would advise Brother Stubb to use 
one nitro card wad, 11 gauge, and 2*4 inch 
nitro felt wads 10 gauge, in his No. 12 
brass shells, over powder ; thin wad over 
shot. He would do well to begin with a 
scant 2 dram load, and work up by experi- 
ment to the best load for his particular 
gun. 

As he is perhaps already aware, semi- 
smokeless is the discovery of our old friend 
Milt Lindsley. which should be enough for 
those who knew and admired his earlier 
product, the old American wood powder. 
E. L. Tiffany, M.D., Wilson, N. Y. 

I noticed an inquiry from Stubb, Or- 
well, O., about a semi-smokeless that could 
be used in brass shot shells. Here is a 
load that will give the best of results in 
brass shells, and will do them no more in- 
jury than black powder. Use new shells, 
or old ones will do, if they can be made 
perfectly clean. Take a thin tube about 
Z J A inches long, the size of an ordinary lead 
pencil, and place it inside shell, over the 
primer pocket. Put 12 grains fine grained 
black powder into the tube ; DuPont is 
good. Then put into the shell outside the 
tube 2*/> or 2-34 drams (black powder meas- 
ure) of DuPont shot gun smokeless. Re- 
move the tube, and wad as an ordinary 
smokeless load with one cardboard and 3 
black edge. Give powder only a snug 
hand pressure. This load will work equally 
well in paper shells. Any primer will do. 
If any readers of Recreation try this load, 
I shall be glad to hear how they like it. . 
O, E. Raynor, Meadville, Pa. 



130 



RECREATION. 



REMINGTON VS. STEVENS. 

In the February issue of Recreation Mr. 
Stokes speaks favorably of the Stevens 
people as contrasted with the Remingtons 
of the old regime, and, while he admits the 
courteousness of the new management, he 
says : "I fear it is too late to regain their 
old place, even with that most excellent 
and most beautiful repeater, the Lee-Rem- 
ington, which they now place on the mar- 
ket." I have had some experience with the 
Stevens Favorite. It has their Ideal ac- 
tion, lever, link, and breechblock, and is 
presumably as well made and as durable 
as the same action on one of their larger 
and more costly rifles. 

A friend asked me to get him a rifle. 
With full knowledge of the accuracy of the 
Stevens weapons, and an abiding faith in 
the excellence of their mechanism ; allured, 
too, by the cheapness of the arm, I bought 
him a Favorite. We set up a target and 
proceeded to try the acquisition. As my 
weapon I had a Remington No. 4, which I 
had bought a year earlier for my boy, who 
had loaned it to a juvenile friend, who, 
after shooting it with black powder shorts 
until it was as foul as a pigsty, set it in 
the stable for a month. When I got pos- 
session of it, it was a discouraging propo- 
sition, but I put in a half day of hard work 
with the wiping rod and hot water, and at 
last got it into shape for use. 

This I pitted against the little Favorite. 
The latter had all the famed accuracy of 
the Stevens output and a delicacy of trig- 
ger which made it a delight to use, and my 
friend was soon handling it in great style. 
Bulls-eyes and centers were in order at 25 
yards, off hand. 

For a time my friend was the happiest 
man in Maryland. Presently, however, the 
lever began to droop, and hang loose. The 
manufacturers gave instructions, in such 
cases, to tighten, or loosen, I forget which, 
a screw in the extension of the breech- 
block. This helped matters for a time, but 
it had soon to be done again, and as age 
grew on the gun it became more and more 
clanky. The screw would work back again 
into the droopy place at once. 

At last he grew discouraged. I took the 
little rifle off his hands, made him a pres- 
ent of a .25-20 repeater, and disposed of the 
Stevens elsewhere. It is in good, careful 
hands ; its present owner can make a bulls- 
eye look like 30 cents ; and the accuracy of 
the rifle is up to the high standard of the 
Stevens goods. Its former owner, still de- 
siring a 22, has bought a Remington No. 4, 
and is happy again. 

W. H. Nelson, Washington, D. C. 



straight grooves, and asks if any reader 
has seen a similar gun. In reply, I will 
say that such weapons are known as 
straight cut rifles, and were once much 
used and well liked for their accuracy, 
hard shooting and small powder charge. 
Both shot and round ball can be used in 
them. They were noted as close shooters 
with shot, and were much used at shooting 
matches. 

I have one of those rifles which my 
father used as a match and squirrel gun. It 
has a 5-foot octagon barrel, on rifle stock, 
and was made by J. Baer, but where I 
can not say. It was originally a flat lock, 
altered to percussion, and was my first 
rifle. The stock extends the full length of 
the barrel. There are 8 grooves. It uses 
about 60 balls to the pound. Guns of this 
class, together with the smooth bore, were 
made by Lehman, Gompf, Eichholtz and 
several other gunsmiths of Lancaster, Pa. 

I have another gun, known as a 2 groove 
rifle. It is a double barrel express, muzzle 
loading, percussion, made by I. Blanch 
Sons, London, England. The material is 
of the finest, the finish artistic, and the 
locks clear as a bell. It weighs 7^2 pounds. 
The barrels are 28 inch, and there are 2 
sets ; one rifled with 2 grooves and the 
other bored for shot. The grooves of the 
rifled barrels are % inch wide and 1-16 
inch deep, and have a slow twist. The 
balls used are both round and conical. The 
conical balls have on the sides at the base 
2 wings, which fit into the grooves, and the 
spherical ball has a zone or belt entirely 
around its circumference for the same 
purpose. The round balls are 10 to the 
pound and the conical balls 8. The bore is 
about 14 gauge. 

I have lately come into possession of a 
Mauser automatic repeating pistol made in 
Spain. It is graceful and elegant, with a 4 
inch barrel, nickel plate, blued body, receiv- 
er and base, and pearl stock. I have found 
it not entirely satisfactory, as it does not 
always discharge, and a cartridge some- 
times flies from the top of the magazine. 
Neither does it always extract as it should. 
E. E. Stokes, New York, N. Y. 



OLD WEAPONS AND A NEW ONE. 
In April Recreation A. Kennedy, Mis- 
soula, Mont., describes a peculiar rifle with 



PREFERS THE SAVAGE. 
L. G. S., of Brooklyn, asks in Septem- 
ber Recreation if the Savage rifle ever 
balks. When Winchester cartridges are 
used it will balk. The Savage rifle car- 
tridges made by the Winchester Co. are 
longer than those made by the U. M. C. 
and Savage companies. With cartridges 
manufactured by or for either of the last 
2 named firms it is absolutely impossible 
for the Savage to clog, whether working 
the lever fast or slow. I have repeatedly 
tested the 'extracting properties with other 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



131 



repeaters, with results in speed and cer- 
tainty of action in favor of the Savage. 

In answer to the query, is the Savage 
.303 better than the Winchester 30-30, I 
say yes, both in power and accuracy. 
The Winchester 30-40 more nearly ap- 
proaches the Savage in execution. How- 
ever, there is a 30-30 Savage. M. L. Par- 
shall, of Chesaning, Mich., writes of a 
fault of the Savage rifle which I have not 
found to exist, namely, that the soft point 
bullet will not penetrate bone. I have used 
the Savage to kill horses and large dogs 
and never failed to penetrate any portion 
of the skull I chose with a soft nose 
bullet. I once shot a buck at 200 yards 
with a soft nose bullet, which smashed 
the shoulder and passed out of the ani- 
mal's breast. I saw G. W. Powers, of 
Thomson, N. Y., shoot a large doe while 
running, with a Savage rifle, using a soft 
nose bullet. The ball struck the animal 
back of the left ear, splitting her head 
completely. 

If suitable ammunition is used with the 
Savage the results will leave nothing to 
be desired. I have owned and shot 
Winchester, Ballard, Remington and 
Stevens rifles, and while they are admirable 
in many ways, I think the Savage is the 
best. While the selection of a rifle is 
largely a matter of personal preference, 
no one will make a mistake who buys a 
Savage. 

W. B. Webster, Schuylerville, N. Y. 



RECOMMEND NO. 44 STEVENS. 

After a lifelong experience in the gun 
business and after using all calibers of 
Stevens No. 44 Ideal rifles I advise W. S. 
Mead to buy the 25 Stevens. It costs less 
and has as much killing power as the 32, 
with a much flatter trajectory. I have shot 
geese through and through with it at 250 
yards. I find the Stevens the best all 
around gun I ever used. I prefer U. M. C. 
ammunition, although the Winchester 
smokeless is good. I have hunted most 
kinds of game and for small game prefer 
the 22 long rifle. For large game I have 
never used anything equal to the .^03 soft 
point Savage. That gave me the best re- 
sults on bear and deer. I have no use for 
the Marlin. I have owned 3 and have re- 
paired hundreds and never saw one that 
would not" stick just when most needed. 
H. C. Clinoinger, Akron, O. 

In answer to M. S. Mead, Woodstock, 
N. Y., I would say that I use a Stevens 
Ideal No. 44, 32 rim fire rifle, and am much 
pleased with it. I do not use either the 
long or the short cartridge. Both are in- 
ferior to the 32 long rifle, inside lubricated. 
With that cartridge I have done good 
work at about 440 yards, I have shot 



pigeons at 100 yards without raising the 
sights at all. 

Allyn Tedmon, Ridgefield, N. J. 

Answering W. S. Mead, Woodstock, N. 
Y., I have a No. 44 Stevens 28-30, which I 
consider one of the finest shooting guns I 
ever saw. No gun will do more than fairly 
accurate work using the 32 caliber rim fire 
cartridges. They can not be depended on 
for close shooting over 100 yards. The 22 
long rifle and the 25 rim fire are much 
more reliable. 

Garvey Donaldson, Macksburg, O. 



ANSWER REPEATER, 
Repeater, of Jamestown, N. Y., asks 
as to the necessity of using wads over 
and under ball in an old army revolver. 
I have a 44 army revolver, 8-inch barrel, 
weighing 3 pounds. I use 40 grains Du- 
Pont f.f.g. powder, without wads of any 
kind. The balls, round, 140 grains, conical 
211 grains, fit the chamber so tightly there 
is no escape of gas. Recently I fired 36 
shots at 50 yards. All were placed within 
the diameter of a dinner plate. A saucer 
would have covered most of them. The 
balls will penetrate 3 inches of wood at 50 
yards, and are accurate at 100 yards. I en- 
joy Recreation exceedingly, and have 
learned much from its gun and ammuni- 
tion department. The letter in January 
issue by Ed. J. Anderson is as sensible 
an article as I ever read relative to 
would-be sportsmen praising or condemn- 
ing certain makes of goods. If some 
Willie borrows a gun and a few car- 
tridges for his annual half-day hunt, 
and finds that the gun goes off when he 
pulls the triggers, he straightway inflicts 
on a suffering world his opinion that such 
and such are the only guns and shells fit to 
use. Or, if a shell misses fire, he is equally 
positive in condemning the entire output of 
its maker. I have used Winchester and U. 
M. C. ammunition, 22 to 45 caliber, in sev- 
eral makes of rifles, also their shot cart- 
ridges, and have yet to miss fire. 

F. B. S., Rochester, N. Y. 

In reply to Repeater, Jamestown, N. Y., 
would suggest that it is not necessary to 
use wads in his 44 caliber Civil War re- 
volver. With pointed bullet use 20 grains 
fine black powder, about f. f. g. If using 
round ball, use not over 15 grains, or the 
bullet will jump the rifling. 

Garvey Donaldson, Macksburg, O. 






WHAT THEY THINK OF THE MARLIN. 

You are doing a good work. Keep it up ! 
Everything that is said in Recreation 
about the Marlin rifle is true. If you 
could be in the position I was with one 
of their guns, you would say more than 



132 



RECREATION. 



you do. I had to take a spike nail 
and hammer to get the cartridge out. 
I worked with the gun until I was tired 
and finally gave it to an old darky for a 
pint of chestnuts. The blamed thing would 
make a parson cuss his existence. 

Hugh Woodward, Knoxville, Tenn. 

W. F. Sheard, of Tacoma, Wash., in his 
gun catalogue has the following to say re- 
garding Marlin guns : - 

I do not manufacture, recommend, or 
guarantee Marlin rifles. If they chew up 
the heads of the cartridges, or clog up in 
the action and magazine, it is not my fault ; 
so do not ship them back on my hands. I 
have Marlin rifles for sale for those who 
want them, but when sold and delivered, 
my responsibility ceases. 

L. E. Nelson, Tacoma, Wash. 

The following quotation from Shakes- 
peare is respectfully called to the attention 
of Mr. Marlin and the Peters Cartridge 
Company. 

"Happy are they that hear their own de- 
tractions and can put them to mending." 
J. J. Morcom, Hartford, Conn. 

'I have no use for the Marlin rifle. It is 
the biggest humbug I ever saw. I lost a 
chance to get a shot at a black bear by a 
shell catching in the lifter. The .30-40 
Winchester is, in my estimation, the only 
gun. G. L. Manor, Postfalls, Idaho. 



THE ADVANTAGE OF A STRAIGHT STOCK. 

In July Recreation Henry Merlin asks, 
"Why can not one get a gun with 3^2 inch 
drop without paying extra?" and further 
says : "Straight stocks seem the fashion at 
present, and one can see long necked men 
at the trap kinking their spines to bring the 
eye to the level of the barrel. If those 
men were quail hunting in thick cover they 
would in almost every case shoot under 
their birds, not having time to bring the 
cheek down to the gun." 

I have by experience learned the op- 
posite ; and think the shooters referred 
to overshoot when they miss. It is the 
crooked stock guns that shoot under. 
About 10 years ago crooked stocks were 
popular, and at that time I ordered my first 
hammerless gun. The dealer told me that, 
as I had a long neck, a 3^-inch drop 
would be correct. The gun invariably shot 
under the birds. 

Now I use a gun with 2^-inch drop, with 
better results; the straighter stock throws 
the aim high, and as birds and targets are 
nearly always rising the shooter must hold 
over or miss. Sometimes we aim point 
blank at a straight-away bird and pull the 
trigger, when we know we should have 
held over. The straight stock will help 
us to ayoi4 that error. 



Again, the small shot used for quail or 
target shooting will drop about 5 inches 
at 40 or 45 yards, and I believe that some 
guns are bored to shoot a trifle high to 
overcome the drop. When the gun is not 
so bored, the remedy must be found in the 
straight stock. 

C. W. Gripp, Pacific Beach, Cal. 



NOT DOGS BUT POT HUNTERS. 

I have noticed in your magazine a con- 
sensus of opinions against the use of bird 
dogs in hunting game birds. Someone said 
that if sportsmen must keep and use dogs 
they should pay $10 a year license fee. 
That gentleman has, no doubt, overlooked 
the fact that thousands of people own dogs 
of one kind or another in the large cities 
and are now paying an annual license fee 
of $1 to $2. In Baltimore a fee of $2 is 
required for the first year's license and 
thereafter $1.50 annually. About three- 
fourths of the sportsmen who gun for 
game birds are owners of bird dogs. The 
other one-fourth who also hunt game 
birds do so without dogs. The pot hunt- 
er tracks birds in the snow, or watches 
where they feed, and early in the morn- 
ing takes his pot gun and kills as many 
birds with one barrel as a self respecting 
sportsman, hunting with a dog, would bag 
in a 2 or 3 days' hunt, where birds are not 
plentiful. 

It is not the man who kills birds for 
sport that is helping to deplete our avail- 
able stock of game birds. Far from it. 
The market hunters destroy every year a 
far greater number of birds than the ordi- 
nary sportsman will ever take. Let some 
cf these fellows who talk so much do their 
little mite toward preserving the birds 
through a severe winter and they can feel 
assured that they have accomplished some- 
thing. However, most of them think that 
"they also serve who only sit and wait." 
H. J. E. Thomas, Baltimore, Md. 



WHY SAVAGE DOES NOT MAKE A 30-40. 
Utica, N. Y., U. S. A., May 5, 1902. 

In reading your always interesting maga- 
zine, I came across the article by F. Q. 
Rutherford, of Chihuahua, Mexico. There 
is a good reason why the Savage Arms 
Company has not, up to date, manufactured 
a rifle to take the 30-40 Government cart- 
ridge. It is this : 

The Government has condemned the 30- 
40 cartridge, and has designed a superior 
one, which they are adapting the Krag to 
use. The cartridge will be seamless shell, 
30 caliber, with better velocity and more 
accurate than the 30-40 now used by the 
Government. A complete set of tools to 
manufacture a new rifle costs $45,000 to 
$60,000, and it was but wisdom to wait 
until the new cartridge was designed an4 



GUNS AND AMMUNITION. 



133 



adopted before going to such an expense, 
because as soon as the new cartridge is 
issued to the U. S. Troops, the present 
30-40 will be an obsolete cartridge. One of 
the greatest advantages claimed for the 
30-40 ammunition is the fact that the Gov- 
ernment ammunition can be procured in 
any part of the country, especially where 
there is a military post. As soon as possi- 
ble, the Savage Arms Company will manu- 
facture a rifle to take the new cartridge, 
but it will be 18 mouths or 2 years before 
this can be turned out for the market. The 
22 caliber is under way, and will come 
out this fall. 

Arthur Savage, 
Managing Director Savage Arms Co. 



TO PREVENT RUST. 

Some of your readers have asked for 
advice regarding the prevention of rust in 
small caliber rifles, and have been advised 
by others to clean the gun thoroughly .and 
then draw an oiled rag through it. That is 
excellent as far as it goes ; but it by no 
means goes far enough. I have had a rifle 
so treated rust badly in 2 weeks. The 
reason is obvious ; acid in the oil. Most 
lubricating oil is unfit for such use. The 
officers of the Ordnance Department and 
Artillery Corps of our army know well 
that ordinary oil must not be placed in the 
carefully machined recoil cylinders of 
heavy guns, and accordingly use only spe- 
cial oil furnished by the Ordnance Depart- 
ment after careful test of its neutrality. 

The safest protection for guns is prob- 
ably the gun grease sold by reliable manu- 
facturers and to be had of any gun dealer. 
My shot gun does not rust when stored 
for months or when used in rain or even in 
salt water spray. It is protected by grease 
made by Scott & Richards, Boston. So 
little grease is required that the gun apuears 
perfectly clean and does not soil han3s" or 
clothing. A 15 cent tube contains sufficient 
to keep a shot gun a year even if the grease 
be used after every hunt and at the rate of 
2 hunts a week. 

R. R. Raymond, 
First Lieut., Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., 

Montgomery, Ala. 



A RECORD-MAKING REMINGTON. 

In March Recreation C. A. M. asks 
about the shooting qualities of the Reming- 
ton double gun. I have been using one 2 
years in the field and at the traps for both 
live and clay birds, and will tell him my 
experience. 

The gun I use is an A. grade, 30 inch 
full choke Damascus barrels, patterned at 
336 left and 334 right, with f.f.g. powder 
and No. 8 shot. I have made as eood 

pattern^ 9 r P ea /ly §°? with j^o. 7^2 shot 



and Ballistite powder. Also with Laflin & 
Rand new Infallible powder. Am using 
the latter at present with No. 7 shot. 

I began tran shooting with this gun in 
May, '01, and as I never had shot over 
traps before I did not make a brilliant show- 
ing. Now I am able to make 22 or 23 right 
along and have made 25 straight. Am 
shooting against Parker, Ithaca, Marlin, 
Trancotte, Smith and Winchester guns, and 
my gun has the high record in this club and 
town. If C. A. M. wants a gun for trap 
work 30 inch barrels probably are best; 
but for brush I should choose 26 inch bar- 
rels, right open and left slightly modified. 
Dr. R. L. Williams, Kane, Pa. 



U. M. C. BETTER THAN GERMAN. 

I saw in January Recreation an article 
on the Mauser by E. E. Stokes, giving his 
experience with German and U. M. C. 
ammunition for that gun. I have a 7 m-m 
Mauser, and have found the same trouble 
with German-made ammunition that Mr. 
Stokes did, but I have had no trouble what- 
ever with U. M. C. shells. The U. M. C. 
Co. uses Troisdorf powder in loading Mau- 
ser cartridges, and I fail to see why it should 
not be as powerful here as in Germany. 
I load my own ammunition, using Du- 
Pont's 30 caliber military powder, 40 or 42 
grains, and U. M. C. 7 m-m bullets. Occa- 
sionally a shell will split at the first dis- 
charge, but I have a clip of 5 shells that 
have been fired 12 times each with full 
charges of DuPont powder, yet show no 
signs of weakness. With that charge, 42 
grains, I have put a full metal jacketed 
bullet through a green button ball tree 26 
inches in diameter, at 200 yards range. 

Am sorry the Laflin & Rand Co. do not 
advertise in Recreation, now, for they 
make the best shot gun smokeless I ever 
used. L. H. Higgins, 

Master S. S. Admiral Sampson. 



ANSWER E. E. VAN DYKE. 

Readers of Recreation at this place think 
E. E. Van Dyke should have filed an affi- 
davit with his story in the February issue. 
That was a wonderful little rifle he had. 
Mr. Van Dyke could draw a large salary 
in a gun factory. They could fit him out 
with a hickory log, and shut down the 
other machinery. If he can straighten a 
rifle barrel by whanging it over a stump, he 
can doubtless, also, enlarge the bore by 
blowing through it. 

C. E. Wilson, Mt. Carlon, Colo. 

In February Recreation is an article by 
E, E. Van Dyke. He shoots a deer through 
the heart with a 30-30 and it runs 250 yards 

lefor? falling, Again he shoots 4 deer 



134 



RECREATION. 



with 4 shots at 75 yaras with a Stevens 22 
and they all drop dead in their traeks. Mr. 
Van Dyke forgot to send salt along with the 
story. Silver Tip, Sicamous, B. C. 

I move that E. E. Van Dyke be awarded 
a leather medal for his article in February 
Recreation. 

A. M. Hare, Bay City, Ore. 



STILL HITTING PETERS. 

Schenectady, N. Y. 
Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio : 

Dear Sirs : — As a friend of Recreation 
and fair play, allow me to suggest that you 
promptly renew your advertising contract 
with Mr. G. O. Shields. It is, in a sense, 
none of my business : but I think Mr. 
Shields is right. Unfavorable comments 
occasionally act as salt to the dish, and do 
a good article far more good than harm. 

Yours truly, John A. Learned. 

Penn Yan, N. Y. 
Messrs. Peters Cartridge Co., 

Cincinnati, Ohio : 

Dear Sirs : — I notice in Recreation a 
letter of yours that looks flunkey. Why 
don't you widen the rim of your cartridge 
a little, to fit the best brush you make, and 
not kick because some honest sportsman 
finds an honest fault with an honest fact. 
Hope your difficulties will be amicably 
arranged. Shooters are watching. 

Respectfully, H. R. Philips. 



HOW TO RELOAD 30-30 SHELLS. 

I thank H. B. Rantzau for the in- 
formation he gave in October Rec- 
reation about loading 30-30 shells with 
round balls. I tried his load and found 
it extremely accurate. I used a 22 long 
shell full of Laflin & Rand sporting 
smokeless powder. It is clean, but not 
more than half the charge burns. That 
does not seem to affect the accuracy, but 
the unburned powder runs back into the 
action when the gun is turned up. In- 
stead of a tack hammer for seating the 
bullets, I use steady turning pressure 
against a soft pine board. This ammuni- 
tion will run through the magazine of my 
30-30 Savage if the balls are firmly seated. 
I like to read the opinions of Jack Pattern, 
F. J. Grube and others who understand 
guns. It would be a great treat for read- 
ers of the gun and ammunition depart- 
ment if the editor would publish an 
illustrated article describing one of the 
large gun factories and telling how rifles 
and ammunition are manufactured. 

M. P. R., Tylerhill. Pa. 



PREFER THE 23-20 WINCHESTER. 

In reply to A. J. Lang, Rondout, N. Y., 
will say I have owned a number of rifles 
of various makes and calibers, and have 
found the 25-20 single shot as good a target 
rifle as any. It is extremely accurate with- 
in its range. As a game gun, I have not 
used it much except on woodchuck. One 
day last summer I killed 9 in 2 hours at 
various ranges up to 100 yards. 

C. W. Ditsworth, Lanark, 111. 

Tell A. J. Lang that the 25-20 Win- 
chester as a target and hunting gun is all 
right. I have killed ducks with mine where 
it would have been impossible to reach 
them with a shot gun, and where a larger 
rifle would not have left anything but 
feathers. For target work there is no 
more accurate arm, not excepting the 
Stevens. J. B. Watson, Muncie, Ind. 



SAPOLIO WOULD SCRATCH RIFFLE 
BARRELS. 
I noticed in January Recreation an 
article by George McLean on how to keep 
small bore, smokeless powder rifles clean. 
He recommends the use of Sapolio. That, 
no doubt, will do the work effectively, but 
how about the scratching? I had occasion 
the other day to use Sapolio in removing 
spots from the surface of a lamp chimney. 
I succeeded; also succeeded in scratching 
the chimney so as to almost ruin it. 
Flint glass is harder than even Krupp 
steel. Of course the abrasion would be 
slight each time and not noticeable at first, 
but I am mistaken if it would not ruin the 
rifle in time ; and I wonder by what reason- 
ing he arrives at the conclusion that by 
leaving the breech block open, the inside of 
the barrel will not rust whether cleaned or 
not, providing the inside is dry? I never 
heard of that theory, but there are doubt- 
less many good things I never heard of. 
A. L. Hull, Denver, Colo. 



SMALL SHOT. 

In March Recreation I notice W. H. 
May's comments on W. D. Gruet's squirrel 
shooting with a telescope sight. I have 
one of Cummins' 'scopes on a 38-55, and 
from my experience should say that such 
shooting as Mr. Gruet's would be almost 
impossible off-hand. I am glad to see W. 
H. Long stand up for the old 38-55 Win- 
chester. With the smokeless, soft point 
bullet, I believe it powerful enough for any 
game in this country. It is one of the 
easiest shells to reload, being straight. An- 
other advantage is that everlasting shells 
can be had in this caliber. They do not 
need to be resized, and are practically in- 
destructible. I use them for practicing 






Gl XS AND AMMUNITION. 



i35 



only, as they can not be put through the 
magazine. I should like to hear from some- 
one using a Stevens 22-15-45 or 22-15-60, 
as to its power, range, etc. 

H. D. Chisholm, Dalhousie, N. B. 



I saw recently a letter in Recreation 
advising the use of hot water to clean gun 
barrels. I think such advice is an error. I 
have read that hot or boiling water will in- 
jure gun barrels by destroying their tem- 
per, which looks reasonable. It does not 
seem necessary to use water, either hot or 
cold. A good brass cleaner, followed by an 
oiled swab or rag, will clean a gun more 
quickly and better than any other method, 
and can not injure the gun. As a rust-pre- 
ventive, when a gun is to be set away for 
some time, there is nothing better than 
boiled linseed oil. Applied to the inside of 
the barrel, it dries and forms a thin coat- 
ing, impervious to moisture. Have found, 
it a perfect way to preserve the gun when 
not in use. The first shooting will remove 
it. W. A. Remele, Bridgewater, Vt. 



In reply to the question of R. M. C, 
would state that in a letter the Savage peo- 
ple say: "The penetration of the full jack- 
eted .303 Savage cartridge is, approximate- 
ly, 50 inches in pine. We have proven this 
a number of times." The Winchester peo- 
ple write me as follows : "The .303 Savage 
has a velocity of 1,840 feet and a penetra- 
tion of S3 pine boards, each % inches thick, 
at a distance of 15 feet from the muzzle. 
This is with the full metal patched bullet. 

"Under identically the same conditions, 
the .30 U. S. A. and .303 British full metal 
patched bullets have a velocity of 1,960 
feet a second and a penetration of 58 
boards." H. L. Pugh, W. Phila., Pa. 



I should like to hear through Recreation 
from someone who has used the Luger 
automatic revolver on big game. Would 
it answer in the place of a rifle to kill 
game for food where game is plentiful and 
can be approached within 50 to 100 yards? 
A. L. Taber, Santa Ana, Cal. 

The Luger automatic pistol has about 
the same power as a 32-20 black powder 
cartridge shot from an ordinary hunting 
rifle and would have approximately the 
same effect on game as this charge. The 
greater skill required to shoot a revolver 
would, however, make the chances much 
less of hitting game than with a rifle at 
ordinary hunting distances. — Editor. 



sights that he writes about. Even when 
I equipped my rifle with the Lyman peep 
and club sights I could not see well 
enough. Explaining this difficulty to my 
oculist it was suggested that a glass corre- 
sponding to that wiiich I used be applied 
to the cup disc of the peep sight. This 
removed the difficulty at once and I can 
see perfectly with my sights, without other 
glasses. This idea is not new, but as it 
fits Mr. Alexander's case he might be dad 
to know it. J. Doux, Utica, N. Y. 



I recently bought some of the new lubri- 
cated wire patched bullets made by the 
National Projectile Works of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., and found them all 
that is claimed. I gave them a thor- 
ough test with black and smokeless pow- 
ders of various kinds and charges and in 
different guns. They are the best bullets I 
have ever used, and I have been hunting 
big game many years, making collections 
for museums, etc. 

Albert R. Beymer, Rocky Ford, Colo. 



In answer to H. F. L.'s question in Sep- 
tember Recreation as to which is the best 
rifle, a 25-20 or a 32-20, would say I wrote 
the Winchester Arms Co. on the same sub- 
ject, stating that I wanted a gun for small 
game and target shooting up to 200 yards. 
They answered as follows: "We believe 
you will find the 32-20 rifle more satisfac- 
tory than the 25-20." I took the hint, 
bought a 32-20 and have never regretted the 
choice. Single Shot, Milwaukee, Wis. 



Say to D. R. McLean that he will be well 
pleased if he buys a Winchester rifle. I 
have a '92 model, 38 caliber, 22 inch octa- 
gon barrel, which I would not exchange for 
any gun I ever saw. On a camp hunt last 
fall I killed 3 deer, 5 turkeys and a pan- 
ther with it. Have also a Spencer repeating 
shot gun for ducks. With any sort of a 
chance it will stop 3 or 4 birds out of a 
flock before they can get out of range. 

F. L. Smith, Clarksdale, Miss. 



t Please tell Mr. Alexander, of Minneapo- 
lis, I had the same trouble with my rifle 



In reply to W. E. C, of Salem, Conn., 
will say I have used a No. 44 Stevens 
Ideal 25-20 nearly a year. W. E. C. will 
make no mistake if he gets one. My gun 
has a 30-inch barrel, with Lyman combina- 
tion sights. I have killed woodchucks 15 
to no steps with it. I have shot rabbits, 
squirrels and large hawks. It does its 
work if held right and has more penetra- 
tion than one would think. 

W. C. N., Barboursville, Ky. 



*3<5 



RECREATION. 



In March Recreation James Colton, of 
Normal, 111., is quoted as saying "Peters 22 
cartridges will fail to explode about 1 in 5." 
My experience with them has been different. 
Within the last 60 days I have used not 
less than 800 without one miss fire. I have a 
Winchester repeater and for accuracy and 
reliability it is all one could desire. Per- 
haps Mr. Colton's gun was at fault. 

Chas. J. Hill, Bridgeport, O. 



F. L. N., who asks for the address of a 
maker of 28 gauge shot guns, is advised 
that the Remington Arms Company, Ilion, 
N. Y., makes a 28 gauge gun in several dif- 
ferent grades. If he will write these peo- 
ple they will give him full information. 
J. D. H., Port Jervis, N. Y. 



I own a Remington hammerless, grade 
A, 12 gauge, weight 8% nounds." It is a 
gun I cheerfully recommend without quali- 
fication. There is no better medium priced 
gun made. I enjoy Recreation more and 
more with each successive issue. 

W. G. Fanning, Lubec, Me. 



I don't see how anyone that ever shoots 
a gun can get along without Recreation. 
I find something in every number that is 
worth more than the price of the whole 
year's subscriptions. Give us more about 
guns and ammunition. 

Geo. Burns, Salina, Utah. 



The .30-40 and .303 carbines are excel- 
lent for large game, especially for bear or 
elk. ' The .30-30 is a trifle small for such 
game. A big silvertip would eat a whole 
dox of .30-30's and a man or 2 besides, be- 
fore giving up. 

Sam Stevens, Cripple Creek, Colo. 



Like Glenn McGowan, I, also, like the 
Stevens Favorite rifle. Have had one 2 
years. Recently I killed a crow with it at 
135 yards, using a Winchester 22 long, 
smokeless cartridge. I use a Lyman rear 
sight. F. Winton, Spring Hill, Tenn. 



Ed. J. Anderson, in January Recreation, 
advocates the use of olive oil for the in- 
side of a gun. I have always found any 
vegetable oil inferior to other oils. I think 
others have said the same in Recreation. 
W. S. Brown, Oxford, O. 



We are organizing a gun club, no mem- 
ber of which can be over 23 years or under 
16. No game hog can get in under any 



circumstances. The club allows each gun 
15 quails a day. It now has 30 members. 
C. C. Greisenbeck, Bastrop, Texas. 



Please tell me through Recreation, what 
would be the effect of a 22 caliber mush- 
room bullet on a woodchuck? Also, what 
is the carrying power of 22 long and long 
rifle bullets in a Stevens crack shot rifle? 
Crack Shot, Hudson, N. Y. 



While so many are praising high power 
guns, nothing is said about the .40-72 Win- 
chester. It is an accurate and powerful 
weapon. I should like to learn the opin- 
ions of others about it. 

D. C. Hoisington, Amsden, Vt. 



Will someone please tell me if the 32 
Ideal cartridge is accurate when used in a 
Remington No. 3 rifle? I have been told 
that in that shell the lead and powder load 
are disproportionate. 

E. A. Bunts, Ellsworth, O. 



Will T. R. S., Ithaca, N. Y., kindly send 
me description of the tool he made for 
counter-boring brass shells to use Win- 
chester No. 4 primer; also state how he 
did the work? 

John E. Connor, Concord, Mass. 



What kind of sights are most serviceable 
for general use in game shooting? I have 
a Savage .303. Will some sportsmen kindly 
give me the benefit of their experience? 
D. W. Gans, M.D., Massillon, O. 



Will some of your many able correspon- 
dents tell me how the 7 m. m. and the 8 
m. m. Mauser rifles compare in power with 
the American 30-40? 

Vindet, Pittsburg, Pa. 



Will you or some of your subscribers 
please give me information as to the load- 
ing of 12 gauge shells with E. C. or Laflin 
& Rand powder? 

Frank A. Ward, Sterling, 111. 



Mr. A. G. Burg, who asks help in choos- 
ing a medium priced gun, will find the 
Parker and the Lefever among the best on 
the market. 

H. V. Bell, Columbia City, Wash. 



Will some readers of Recreation kindly 
relate their experience with lubricated 
wire patched bullets used in quick twist 

rirl a s 

F. P. Vedder, Broadalbin, N. Y. 



NATURAL HISTORY. 

When a bird or a wild animal is killed, that is the end of it. It photographed, it may still live and its educational 

and scientific value is multiplied indefinitely. 



THE FLYING SQUIRREL. 

Somerset Co., Pa. 
Editor Recreation : 

I notice that someone asks through Rec- 
reation for information concerning the lit- 
tle grey, or American, flying squirrel. I am 
glad of an opportunity to call attention 
to this beautiful little creature which, ow- 
ing to its timid disposition and strict noc- 
turnal habits, is little known. Even the 
naturalists seem to neglect it, which is to be 
wondered at, considering its surpassing 
beauty and its remarkable aerial powers. It 
is but a liny creature, hardly so large as 
a chipmunk, yet it affords wider oppor- 
tunity for nature study than a grizzly bear. 
It is clothed in long fur, as fine as the silk 
of Minerva's own spinning, which puts to 
shame the spider. It is dark grey brown 
above and as white as the snows of heaven 
beneath, the colors 'not shading into each 
other, but with an abrupt line of demarca- 
tion which follows along the edge of its 
"parachute extension." Its eyes are large 
and, like those of all nocturnals, black. Its 
distinguishing feature, which makes it a 
flying squirrel, is the broad band of skin 
connecting its front and hind legs. Worthy 
of special notice also is the peculiar struct- 
ure of its tail. The hairs, which are firm, 
but not stiff, are so arranged along the 
sides as to form a flat or slightly concave 
surface beneath. Viewed from the under 
side, the tail resembles a feather. Its use 
will appear later. 

When the squirrel is at rest or running, 
the skin which forms his parachute, by 
its own elasticity, draws in folds to the 
animal's flanks, where it is out of the way 
and out of sight ; but when he has occasion 
to pass from one tree to another and does 
not wish to descend to the ground, he 
leaps boldly into space, stretching out his 
little legs in the same act. The flaps, which 
were so neatly tucked away, then do excel- 
lent service as wings and he skims away 
like a swallow. He does not fly, in any 
sense of the word. On leaving the limb he 
takes a direction obliquely toward the 
ground, which position, with the front part 
of the body lower than the back part, he 
maintains throughout his course. Once in 
the air his motion is simply the result of 
gravitation, modified by the law of resist- 
ance. Gravitation, the balance wheel of 
the universe, would draw him straight to 
the earth, but there is another law of nature 



which says that he must move in the direc- 
tion of the least resistance. When Dame 
Nature was making the squirrels she 
thought of this particular combination of 
her laws and made one species expressly 
to take advantage of it. The broad bands 
of skin along the sides of the animal en- 
counter much air, which offers much re- 
sistance to its straight downward motion; 
but moving obliquely downward and for- 
ward with its body tilted in the same di- 
rection, it encounters relatively little air, 
consequently this must be the direction of 
its course. Here we see the use of his 
tail. By it and his head he is able to as- 
sume the proper tilt for the required dis- 
tance. The lower his head the shorter and 
swifter will be his flight. Of course it will 
be seen that the distance of his flight de- 
pends on the height of his starting point 
and the angle of his descent. He must al- 
ways descend, for gravitation, which is 
the only motive power, can act only in that 
direction. Before he alights he gives an 
upward swoop, in order to lessen his speed 
and consequently the shock. He does this 
just in the same way that a sled, after slid- 
ing swiftly down a hill runs partly up the 
next. 

I never saw a flying squirrel abroad in 
daylight of its own accord, and when driv- 
en out, they hasten to some dark retreat; 
but when the shades of night have fallen 
they come forth by families, for they are a 
sociable people, and engage in such sports 
as you might imagine ordinary squirrels 
further endowed with the power of flight 
might carry on. Their food consists large- 
ly of nuts and insects, preference given to 
the latter. When a boy I frequently caught 
them in traps set for other animals, and 
baited with meat. I remember one time I 
had set a box trap for a skunk, and on 
visiting the trap next morning, I found the 
lid down. I raised it rather incautiously 
to investigate, when out came a little brown 
flash. It paused a moment to reconnoiter, 
but not seeing any welcome tree convenient 
it did the next best thing; it ran up me, 
in spite of my frantic remonstrance. When 
it reached my shoulder it paused not a 
moment, but giving me a vigorous spurn, 
leaped toward a giant oak, up which it ran 
and then sailed away several hundred feet, 
doubtless chuckling over its escape, al- 
though at no time had it been in peril. 

D. S. Boucher. 



137 



138 



RJECkEATlON. 



HOW GROUSE TAKE WATER. 

I have been much interested in the dis- 
cussion as to whether ruffed grouse 
drink water in the same manner as the 
domestic fowl, and until recently was of 
the opinion thev did not, as I have watched 
their habits closely in Maine, Massachu- 
setts and Minnesota, and never saw a 
grouse drink, though they will pick drops 
of water from twigs and grass. At the 
Sportsmen's Show, in Boston, I was 
watching a male grouse, standing on a log, 
with ruff extended, wings dropped and 
tail partly spread, as though about to drum, 
when another grouse came out of the 
brush in the pen and drank water from a 
tin pan exactly as a hen would do it. This 
may be a result of domestication, as I have 
noticed that many birds and animals 
change their habits under different condi- 
tions. 

We have been feeding the squirrels about 
our house for more than a year, and 
have 2 red and 7 grey squirrels that 
come regularly for peanuts. The cats hunt 
these squirrels continually and have caught 
several. Yesterday morning I noticed a 
strange squirrel in company with one of 
our old pets, whose mate was -killed by a 
cat last fall. The new squirrel looks thin 
and acts hungry, but does not know what a 
peanut is for. It will examine the one be- 
ing eaten by its companion, and then hunt 
around with it until it finds a nut; but it 
will not eat a peanut, though it will take a 
walnut at once. 

C. G. Brackett, Boston, Mass. 

Mr. E. T. Seton, in his book, "Wild Ani- 
mals I Have Known," page 312, story of 
Redruff. says : "Then came the drink, the 
purest of living water, although silly men 
had called it Mud creek. At first the 
little fellows didn't know how to drink, 
but they copied their mother, and soon 
learned to drink like her, and give thanks 
after every sip." The illustration at the 
top of the page shows the young grouse 
standing along the bank of the creek, drink- 
ing. Assuredly, Mr. Seton would scarcely 
assert such a thing if he did not have good 
ground to base his claims on. 

David S. Wegg, Jr., Chicago, 111. 

If you will read, in November Recrea- 
tion, 1901, the article by Mr. A. F. Rice, 
which started this discussion in regard to 
the manner in which grouse take water, 
you will note that he says a certain author 
admits, "I have never seen grouse drink." 
That author was Mr. E. T. Seton. — Editor. 

Being interested in the discussion going 
on in Recreation about grouse drinking, I 
took pains to watch the ruffed grouse at the 
Boston Sportsmen's Show, March 8. One 
of the grouse stepped into the pan of wa- 



ter provided, dipped its bill in, and therl 
raised its head between sips, exactly as a 
hen does in drinking. No doubt many 
others have noticed the same thing, as the 
enclosure contained a number of these 
birds. H. P. Libby, Eliot, Maine. 

While at the Sportsmen's Show in Bos- 
ton, February 22d, I stopped a few min- 
utes in front of the enclosure containing 
a number of ruffed grouse. One of the 
birds hopped on the edge of a pan con- 
taining water and drank copiously. It 
seemed such a natural thing to do that I 
should not consider it worth recording 
had I not noticed the discussion regarding 
the matter in Recreation. 

Wm. L. Skinner, West Cambridge, Mass. 



COON CHATTER. 

I have hunted coons 20 years, and 
am not tired of the sport yet, although 
coons are scarce here. I see in Recrea- 
tion letters about the noise a coon makes. 
I do not believe coons have any call. W T hen 
a coon wants company he comes down 
from his bed tree and hustles off to find 
friends. I have a tame coon in a cage 
close to the house, and have never heard 
him make a noise except to growl at me 
when he is eating. I have had him 2 years. 
He is large, with a beautiful coat of fur. I 
have 4 hounds with which I hunt coons. 
One old one is the finest tree dog I ever 
went in the woods with. I have hunted 
with all kinds of dogs, but with long ex- 
perience I will take the hound, and the 
finer blooded he is the better he suits me. 
I like a hound because he can work a trail 
after the coon has been gone a long time. 
Coons are scarce, and I like to give them a 
chance for their life. I go to hear the chase 
more than to get the game. I have a tent 
and go on a camping trip one week each 
fall. Last year we went to Slaughter 
Neck, 25 miles from here. I should like to 
correspond with anyone interested in coon 
hunting and anyone having pedigree fox 
or deer hounds for sale. Should also like 
to hear direct from the Baltimore man 
who saw the coon eat the bird eggs. 

W. L. Barnes, Seaford, Del. 

I have read with interest the articles 
which have appeared in Recreation from 
time to time, in regard to coons barking 
or making calls. For more than 20 years I 
have hunted coons and have yet to hear 
one bark or make any noise except when 
worried by dogs. As I usually hunt alone 
I should be likely to hear any such noise 
if any were made. I have also kept a num- 
ber of pet coons. Have never heard them 
make any sound, except during the mating 
season. I own some fine coon dogs and 



NATURAL HISTORY. 



139 



should be pleased to correspond with other 
coon hunters who are readers of Recrea- 
tion. 

H. J. Klotzbach, Girard, Iowa. 

I notice an article in Recreation writ- 
ten by F. W. Allard, Atlanta, Georgia, 
who says coons make no noise. He is mis- 
taken. They make a noise similar to that 
of the red owl, but a great deal louder. 
On a still evening they can be heard a 
mile at least. I have heard raccoons in cap- 
tivity chattering. When in a fight they 
make a noise much like that made by a 
shepherd dog. I have a coon in captivity 
at present, caught March 9, 1902. March 
nth, at 8 o'clock, he made the noise de- 
scribed above. I was an ear witness, and 
there were others. 

S. R. Covert, Fayette, N. Y. 

I have read with interest in your valua- 
ble magazine the article by M. H. Douglas 
on coon chatter. I agree with him fully. I 
have a friend who has 2 pet coons that 
chatter and screech a great deal, but I have 
recently been told by an old hunter that a 
coon never screeches or chatters unless in- 
terfered with by some other animal. 

I have been a regular reader of Recrea- 
tion more than 2 years and would not 
miss a copy for 5 times the cost. 

Herbert S. Berry, Saco, Maine. 



GREY SQUIRRELS SHOULD HAVE THEIR 
CORN. 

I saw in January Recreation 2 articles 
by you about protecting grey and fox squir- 
rels. If you lived where they were thick 
and on a farm you would perhaps change 
your mind. Here in Southern Minnesota 
squirrels are numerous, and are not in the 
thick timber, but in groves of one to 10 
acres in extent and are generally near farm 
buildings. That is why the farmers in this 
part of the country want the squirrels 
killed. A squirrel will go to a farmer's 
corn crib, take an ear of corn in his mouth, 
run off with it and hide it, then come back 
after more, and keep on until he has a 
bushel or more stored away. Where there 
are many squirrels it counts up fast, and 
means something to the farmer, especially 
when corn is 50 cents a bushel, as it was 
this year. 

I buy Recreation every month at the 
news stand and like it very much. We 
have a few game hogs here, the kind that 
kill 25 or 30 rabbits and give half of them 
to their cats and dogs. I have seen that 
done more than once. 

F. E. Williams, Spring Valley, Minn. 

I am sure you have been misinformed 
about the work of squirrels. I was born 
and raised on a farm in the West, and have 
b?en among squirrels more or less all my 



life. I have lived in different sections of 
the country at different times, where they 
were abundant, and have studied their 
habits closely. I have never yet seen a 
grey squirrel carry away an ear of corn, 
nor have 1 ever heard of it before. I have 
often known the grey squirrel to go into 
a corn field and make a meal of an ear of 
corn. It is possible he may carry away a 
few Kernels and deposit them in his den 
in some tree, but a whole ear of corn? I 
doubt it seriously. Has any other reader 
of Recreation ever seen a squirrel carry 
away an ear of. corn? Mr. Williams says the 
squirrel keeps on carrying ears of corn un- 
til he has a bushel or more stored away. 
This is simply absurd. I have investigated 
many squirrels' winter cache and have 
never yet found one that contained a quart 
of food. All species of squirrels hibernate 
more or less through the winter and do 
little eating. They are not such gluttons 
as to store 10 or 20 times as much food for 
the winter as they can eat within that time. 
— Editor. 



WRENS FIGHT SPARROWS. 

In looking over the natural history de- 
partment of February Recreation, I noticed 
an article about the sparrow not being the 
only feathered fighter. Last summer I 
made a bird house out of a starch box and 
nailed it to a tree near our woodshed. A 
wren soon came and built in it, and I 
could watch the bird from the window in 
the shed. Of course the sparrows tried 
to drive the wren out, but the wren is able 
to handle sparrows. When the wren went 
away the sparrows went to the house 
and started to pull the sticks out. The 
wren soon found a way to stop this, which 
was to put a lot of sticks squarely across 
the doorway until the hole was too small 
for the sparrows to get in. Then if the 
sparrows tried to pull these sticks out 
the ends caught on either side of the door- 
way and held them in. 

One day the wren was in the house, fix- 
ing some hair in the nest, and some spar- 
rows came along, bent on mischief. The 
wren waited until one of the sparrows 
perched on the shelf just outside the door. 
Then the wren flew suddenly out, right 
in that sparrow's face, and sent him roll- 
ing to the ground. The wren was not 
content with that, and chased the sparrow 
about a block, pecking him hard all the 
way. 

Another time a woodpecker lit above the 
house and started pecking. The wren 
came out and scolded awhile. Then its 
mate came, and they made the woodpecker 
fly off in a hurry. 

Bluejays also chase sparrows. There is 
a water pan for our dog out in our front 



140 



RECREATION. 



yard, and this is a favorite bathing place 
for the birds. The bluejays always chase 
the sparrows away when they happen to 
meet there. . 

The sparrow is not so much of a fighter 
but rather depends on the number in the 
bunch than on individual fighting powers. 
Charles S. Pope, Moline, Til. 



NATURAL HISTORY NOTES. 

In February Recreation I saw an article 
from W. C. Buell, Troy, N. Y., in regard 
to the killing of a ruffed grouse by flying 
against telegraph wires. Last fall 3 of us 
were returning from a hunting trip in In- 
dian Territory. It was past camping time 
and there being no more suitable place in 
sight, we pulled up alongside of a stone 
fence on one side and a 3-wire fence on 
the opposite. While part of us were eating 
supper we heard the wire behind us twang. 
Something had struck forcibly. Running 
quickly over to where the wire was still 
vibrating we discovered one dead quail and 
heara one flopping in the grass, but before 
we could locate it we heard it fly away, 
being only stunned. Some of the boys 
who had gone out after wood were return- 
ing and had cut across the pasture, scaring 
up some birds. It being dark and the 
birds frightened, they had struck the wire 
fence, in their flight. 

All true sportsmen should lend their 
efforts toward the protection of game, and 
I know of no better way to make the start 
than to join the L. A. S. I have killed 
more than the limit in a day's shooting, 
but not since I began reading Recreation. 
Thanks to Coquina and the good work he 
is doing ! May more see they're wrong 
and stop before it is too late and the game 
is no more except in history. 

C. M. Tissue, Partridge, Kan. 



I have a cement aquarium in my yard 
and should like to know what will keep the 
water in it from getting green. 

W. M. Haynes, Austin, Ohio. 

ANSWER. 

The green of which you complain is due 
to the growth of unicellular algae, or small 
microscopic plants, which multiply rapidly. 
It is easy for them to be introduced into 
the aquarium along with the larger plants 
which are put in intentionally. To keep out 
these algse, first clean the aquarium thor- 
oughly, then, when putting in the desired 
water plants, wash them carefully by gent- 
ly drawing them through water, in another 
receptacle, of course, so that any adhering 
algae may be washed off. Even then it may 
be necessary to wash the walls of the aqua- 
rium occasionally. — Editor. 



part of the country where they are plenti- 
ful, and have been a close observer of their 
cunning nature. I have heard several dis- 
cussions as to whether crows smell powder, 
and have decided to ask readers of Recre- 
ation. A friend and I, while out in the 
woods one day, saw a flock of perhaps 200 
crows, which we could approach within 
10 feet. I did not have my gun, but got 
it in short order. When I came within 
gunshot of them they commenced making 
a fearful noise and took flight rapidly. A 
person might think they smelled the pow- 
der, but I thought my stealthy approach 
alarmed them. Should like opinions on 
this subject. 

R. Armstrong, Chatham, Ont. 



I killed some ducks on a small lake near 
here last week and should like to know 
what kind they were. The drakes had 2 
small black tail feathers about 6 inches 
long. The ducks did not have long tail 
feathers. The feet were black on the back 
and blue on the front side. The drakes 
had black breasts, with white ring around 
the neck, white on top of the head and the 
under part of drakes was white. The 
females were about the same color but 
were duller. They had flat bills and were 
not large, weighing about .2 pounds apiece. 

Sayer Rockwell, West Burlington, Pa. 

ANSWER. 

These birds are old squaws, or long tailed 
ducks, Harelda hyemalis. Linn. 



Should like to hear from some reader 
of Recreation who can give me any infor- 
mation in regard to the raising and handling 
of frogs. 

George S. Overdear, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

ANSWER. 

Not long ago the U. S. Fish Commission 
issued a pamphlet on "The edible frogs of 
the United States and their artificial propa- 
gation." This pamphlet is No. 348, and you 
can doubtless obtain a copy by addressing 
a request to Hon. Geo. M. Bowers, Com- 
missioner of Fish and Fisheries, Washing- 
ton, D. C. — Editor. 

In March Recreation I saw an article 
by W. O. Isaacson about 2 white squirrels. 
Not long ago a white chipmunk stayed 
here. It had its nest under a railroad 
bridge. It was seen several times, but it 
has not been seen latefy. 

L. T. Meminger, Spruce Hill, Pa. 



Do crows smell powder? I have not 
khlled many crows', but have lived in a 



Will some reader of Recreation tell me 
how the little spotted ground squirrel digs 
his hole without showing any fresh dirt 
around the mouth of the hole? 

Geo. E. Blackford, Algona, Iowa. 



THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



OFFICERS OF THE L. A. S. 

President, G. O. Shields, 23 W. 24th St., New 
York. 

jst Vic- President, E. T. Seton,] 80 West 
40th St., New York. 

2d Vice-President, W. T. TTornaday, 2969 
Decatur Ave., Bedford Park, N. Y. 

3d Vice-President. Dr. T. S. Palmer, Dept. of 
Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

4th Vice-President, A. A. Anderson, 6 East 
38th St., New York. 

jtA Vice-President. Hon. W.A.Richards, Gen- 
eral Land Office, Washington, D. C. 

Secretary, A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington Ave., 
Passaic, N. J. 

Treasurer, Austin Corbin, of the Corbin Bank- 
ing Co., 192 Broadway, New York City. 



ARIZONA DIVISION. 
M.J. Foley, Chief Warden, Jerome. 
ARKANSAS DIVISION 
W. R. Blockson, Chief Warden, Mena. 

CALIFORNIA DIVISION. 
Dr. David Starr Jordan, Chief Warden, Leland 
Stanford University. C. Barlow, Secy.-Treas., Santa 
Clara. 

COLORADO DIVISION. 
A. Whitehead, Chief Warden, 303 Tabor Building, 
Denver. 

CONNECTICUT DIVISION. 
Hon F. P. Sherwood, Chief Warden, Southport; 
Dr. H. L. Ross, Vice-Warden, Canaan; H. C. Went, 
Sec-Treas., Bridgeport. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DIVISION. 
C. H. Townsend, Chief Warden, U. S. Fish Com- 
mission. 

FLORIDA DIVISION. 

G. G. Clough, Knight Bldg., Tampa. 

GEORGTA DIVISION. 
J.J. Doughty, Chief Warden, Augusta. 

IDAHO DIVISION. 
Hon. T. W. Bartley, Chief Warden, Moscow. 

ILLINOIS DIVISION. 
W.T. Jefferson, Chief Warden, Plymouth Building, 
Chicago; F. M. Taber, Vice Warden, 144 Kinzie 
St., Chicago; G. C. Davis, Sec-Treas ., 123 S. Central 
Ave., Austin. 

INDIANA DIVISION. 
Frank L. Littleton, Chief Warden, 30^ East 
Washington St., Indianapolis ; J. J. Hildebrandt, 
Vice Warden. Logansport ; T.J. Carter, Sec-Treas. 
State House, Indianapolis. 

IOWA DIVISION. 
Carl Quimby, Chief Warden, Des Moines; C. C. 
Proper, Sec-Treas., Des Moines. 

KANSAS DIVISION. 
O. B. Stocker, Chief Warden, Wichita; A. J. 
Applegate, Sec-Treas., 113 E. 1st St., Wichita. 

KENTUCKY DIVISION. 

Geo. C. Long, Chief Warden. Hopkinsville. 
R. L. Brashear, Sec-Treas., Bowling Green. 

MAINE DIVISION. 
Col. E. C. Farrington, Chief Warden, Augusta. 

MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION. 
Heman S. Fay. Chief Warden, Hazleton Block, 
Marlboro; J. E. Tweedy, Vice-Warden, North Attle- 
boro : A. C. Lamson, Sec-Treas., 194 Main St., 
Marlboro. 

MICHIGAN DIVISION. 

Wf. Elmer Pratt. Chief Warden, Grand Rapids ; R. S . 
oodliffe, Vice-Warden, Jackson; A- B. Richmond, 
Sec-Treas., Grand Rapids. 



MINNESOTA DIVISION. 
Dietrich Lange, Chief Warden, 937 York St., St. 
Paul; H. A. Moigan, Vice- Warden, Albert Lea; A. R. 
Bixby, Sec-Treas., 101 Baldwin St., St. Paul. 

MISSOURI DIVISION. 
Bryan Snyder, Chief Warden, 726 Central Bldg., 
St. Louis. 

MONTANA DIVISION. 
Professor M. J. Elrod, Chief Warden, Missoula; 
Sidney M. Logan, Vice- Warden, Kalispell ; R. A. 
Waagner, Sec-Treas., Bozeman. 

NEBRASKA DIVISION. 
Fred. E. Mockett, Chief Warden, Lincoln ; P. 
O'Mahony, Sec-Treas., Lincoln. 

NEVADA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. H. Cavell, Chief Warden, Carson. 
Geo. W. Cowing, Sec-Treas., Carson. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE DIVISION. 
Dr. A. F. Barrett, Sentinel Bldg., Keene, 
Sidney Conant, Sec-Treas., Keene. 

NEW JERSEY DIVISION. 
A. W. Van Saun, Chief Warden, Pompton Plains ; 
Dr. W. S. Colfax, Vice-Warden, Pompton Lakes; I. 
V. Dorland, Sec-Treas., Arlington. 

NEW MEXICO DIVISION. 
W. P. Sanders, Chief Warden, Magdalena. 

NEW YORK DIVISION. 
John R. Fanning. Chief Warden, Powers' Bldg., 
Rochester; Col. R. E. Moss, Vice-Warden, Wallack's 
Theatre, New York City; Dr. C. C. Curtis, Sec- 
Treas , Columbia College, New York City. 

NORTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 
Dr. W. D. Jones, Chief Warden, Devil's Lake. 

OHIO DIVISION. 
W. E, Gleason. Chief Warden, Mitchell P#!dg., 
Cincinnati; A. C. Thatcher, Vice- Warden, Urbana. 

OKLAHOMA DIVISION. 
W. M. Grant, Chief Warden, Oklahoma City. 

ONTARIO DIVISION. 
C A. Hammond, Chief Warden, Box 701, St. 
Thomas; D. L. Mells, Sec-Treas., St. Thomas. 
OREGON DIVISION. 
Robert F. Kelly, Chief Warden, Box 188, The 
Dalles; C. B. Cushmg, Sec-Treas., The Dalles. 
PENNSYLVANIA DIVISION. 
C. F. Emerson, Chief Warden, i8q N. Perry St., 
Titusville ; Hon. C B. Penrose, Vice-Warden, 1720 
Spruce St., Philadelphia; E. Wager-Smith, Sec- 
Treas., 1026 Ridge Ave., Philadelphia. 

RHODE ISLAND DIVISION. 
Zenas W. Bliss, Chief Warden, 49 Westminster St., 
Providence. 

SOUTH DAKOTA DIVISION. 
Burdett Moody, Chief Warden, Lead; John C. 
Barber, Sec-Treas., Lead. 

TENNESSEE DIVISION. 
Hon. G. C Martin, Chief Warden, Clarksville; 
Hon. Austin Peay, Jr., Sec-Treas , Clarksville. 
TEXAS DIVISION. 
Prof. S. W. Stanfield, Chief Warden, San Marcos; 
W. E. Heald, Sec-Treas., San Angelo. 
UTAH DIVISION. 
Hon. John Sharp, Chief Warden, Salt Lake City. 

VERMONT DIVISION. 
W. E. Mack, Chief Warden, Woodstock; S. C. 
White, Sec-Treas., Woodstock. 

VIRGINIA DIVISION. 
Franklin Stearns, Chief Warden, n N. nth St., 
C. O. Saville, Vice- Warden, Richmond; M.D.Hart, 
Sec-Treas., 1217 East Main St., Richmond. 
WASHINGTON DIVISION. 
F. S. Merrill, Chief Warden, Spokane : F. A. Pon- 
tius, Sec-Treas., Seattle; Munro Wyckoff, Vice- War r 
den, Pt. TownsengL 



141 



142 



RECREATION. 



WEST VIRGINIA DIVISION. 
J. M. Lashley, Chief Warden, Davis. 
WISCONSIN DIVISION. 
James T. Drought, Chief Warden, Milwaukee; Dr. 
A. Gropper, Sec.-Ireas., Milwaukee. 

WYOMING DIVISION. 

H. E. Wads worth. Chief Warden, Lander; Frank 
Bond, Sec.-Treas., Cheyenne. 

Applications for membership and orders /or badges 
should be addressed to Arthur F. Rice, Secretary, 23 IV. 
24th St., New York. 

LOCAL 
C'tunty. 
New York, 
Livingston 



Albany, 



Broome, 

Cayuga, 
Chemung, 

Cortland, 
Erie, 



WARDENS IN NEW YORK. 
Name of Warden. Address. 

Conrad L. Meyer, 46 W. Broadway. 

M. De La Vergne, Lakeville. 

K.S. Chamberlain, Mt. Morris. 

C. D. Johnson, Newtonville. 

Henry T. Newman, 

Kenneth E. Bender,Albany. 

John Sullivan, Sanitaria Springs 

R. R. Mathewson, Binghaniton. 

H. M. Haskell, Weedsport. 

Fred. Uhle, Hendy Creek, 

M. A. Baker, Elmira. 

James Edwards, Cortland, 

E. P. Dorr, 103 D. S. Morgan 

Building, Buffalo. 

Marvin H. Butler, Morilla. 

W. H. Broughton, Moriah. 

Jas. Eccles, St. Regis Fails. 

Charles VV Scharf, Canajoharie, 

J. M. Scoville, Clinton. 

Wilson Crans, Middletown. 

J. Hampton Kidd, Newburgh. 

Lewis Morris, Port Richmond. 



Essex, 

Franklin, 

Montgomery, 

Oneida, 

Orange, 
u 

Richmond, 

St. Lawience, Dr. B.W. Severance, Gouverneur. 



Schenectady, 

Suffolk, 
u 

Tioga, 
Washington, 



Westchester, 



Dutchess, 

Columbia, 

Orange, 

Onondaga, 

Yates, 

Dutchess, 

Queens, 



Ulster, 

Jefferson, 

Herkimer, 

Oswego, 

Putnam, 

Schuyler, 

Allegany, 

Schoharie, 

Warren, 

Orleans, 



A. N. Clark, 
J. W. Furnside, 
F. J. Fellows, 
P. F. Tabor, 
Geo. Wood, 
C.L.Allen, 
A. S. Temple, 
J. E. Barber, 
George Poth, 
Chas. Seacor, 

E.G.Horton, 

A. B. Miller, 

Thomas Harris, 
James Lush, 

B. L. Wren, 
Symour Poineer, 
Chas. H. DeLong, 
Jacob Tompkins, 



I. 



Sevey. 

Schenectady. 

Central Islip, L. 

Orient, L. I. 

Owego. 

Sandy Hill. 

Whitehall. 

Dresden. 

Pleasantville. 

57 PeJham Road, 

New Rochelle. 
Pleasantville. 

Jackson's Corners. 

Port Jervis. 
Memphis. 
Penn Yan. 
Branch Port. 
Pawling. 
Billings. 



Gerard Van Nostrand, Flushing, L. I . 
46 Elton Street, 
Brooklyn. 



W. S. Mygrant, 

P. A. Geepel, 

L. B. Drowne, 

M. A. DeVall, 
Wm. S. Mead, 
C. E. Van Order, 

C. I. Smith, 

D. F. Sperry, 
J. E. Manning, 
H. L. Brady, 
G. C. Fordham, 
G. A. Thomas, 
O.E.Eigen, 
Geo. McEchron, 
J . H. Fearby, 



Stark, 
Franklin, 

Cuyahoga, 

Clark, 

Erie, 

Fulton, 
Allen, 



LOCAL WARDENS 
A. Dangelei?en, 
Brook L. Terry, 

A. W. Hitch, 

Fred C Ross, 

David Sutton, 

L. C. Berry, 
S. W. Knisely, 



473 Grand Ave., 

Astoria, L. I. 

119 Somers Street. 

Brooklyn. 

The Corners. 

Woodstock. 

Watertown. 
it 

Old Forge. 

154 West Utica St. 
Mahopac Falls. 
Watkins. 
Belvidere. 
Sharon Springs. 
Glen Falls. 
E. Shelby. 

IN OHIO. 
Massillon. 
208 Woodward Av., 

Columbus. 
161 Osborn St., 
Cleveland. 
169 W. Main St., 

Springfield. 
41X Jackson St., 

Sandusky. 
Swanton. 
Lima. 



County. 
Hamilton, 

Knox, 

Lorain, 

Ottawa, 

Muskingum, 

Scioto, 

Highland, 



Name of Warden. 
W. C. Rippey, 

Grant Phillips, 
T.J.Bates, 
Frank B. Shirley, 
Frank D. Abell, 
J. F. Kelley, 
lames G. Lyle, 



Address. 
4465 Eastern Ave. 

Cincinnati. 
Mt. Vernon. 
Elyria. 
Lakeside. 
Zanesville. 
Portsmouth. 
Hillsboro. 



LOCAL WARDENS IN CONNECTICUT. 



Fairfield, 



George B. Bliss. 



Fail field, 
Litchfield, 

Middlesex, 
New Haven, 



LOCAL 
Norfolk, 

Suffolk, 



Harvey C. Went, 

Samuel Waklee, 
Dr. H. L. Ross, 



2 Park Row. Stam- 
ford, Ct. 
11 Park St.. Bridge- 
port, Ct. 
Box 373, .Stratford. 
P. O. Box 100, Ca- 
naan, Ct. 
Sandford Brainerd, Ivoryton. 
Wilbur E. Beach, 318 Chapel Street, 
New Haven, Ct. 
D. J. Ryan, 188 Elizabeth St., 

Derby. 
WARDENS IN MASSACHUSETTS. 
Orlando McKenzie, Norfolk. 
•J.J. Blick, Wrentham. 

S. W. Fuller, East Milton. 

Capt. W. J. Stone. 4 Tremont Row, 
Boston. 
LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW JERSEY. 



Mercer, 
Mercer. 



Morris, 



Somerset, 

Sussex, 

Union, 

Warren, 

Monmouth. 
Hudson, 



Jos. Ashmore, 

Edw. Vanderbilt, 

Roland Mitchell, 

Joseph Pellet, 
Chas. W. Blake, 
Francis E. Cook, 
Calone Orr. 
G. E. Morris, 



124 Taylor St., 

Trenton. 
Dentzville, 

Trenton. 
739 Centre St., 

Trenton. 
Pompton Plains. 
Dover. 
Butler. 
Hibernia. 
Somerville. 



Isaac D. Williams, Branchville. 



A. H. Miller, 
C M. Hawkins, 
(Jacob Young, 
(Reuben Warner, 
Dory-Hunt, 
A. W. Letts, 



Cranford. 
Roselle. 



LOCAL WARDENS IN 
Jefferson, John Noll, 

Samuel Sundy, 

F. P. Sweet, 
Nelson Holmes, 
Clifford Singer, 
Ezra Phillips, 

G. D. Benedict, 
Ira Murphy, 
Wiley Barrows, 
Chas. Barrows, 
Jasper Tillotson, 
Geo. T. Meyers, 
J. B. Lamb, 
W.H.Lambert, 



Perry, 
Warren. 

Juniata, 

Venango, 
Potter, 



Crawford, 



Cambria, 

Butler, 
A llegheny, 
Beaver, 

McKean, 



Lack, 

Carbon, 

Cumberland, 

Wyoming, 

Tioga, 

Lycoming, 

Delaware, 

Montgomery, 

Bradford, 

Clarion, 

Cameron, 

Clinton, 

Northumber- 
land, 
Elk, 



Phillipsburg. 

Wanaque. 
51 Newark St., 

Hoboken. 
PENNSYLVANIA. 
Sykesville. 
Lebo. 

Goodwill Hill. 
Cornplanter. 
Oakland Mills. 
McAlesterville. 
Pleasantville. 
Coudersport. 
Austin. 
Austin. 
Tillotson. 
Titusville. 
Buel. 
720 Coleman Ave., 

Johnstown. 
Murnnsville. 
Natrona. 
Beaver Falls. 



F. J. Forquer, 
S. H.Allen, 
N. H. Covert, 
W. R. Keefer, 
C. A. Duke, 
L. P. Fessenden, 
Wm. Holsinger, 
Wm. Weir, 
AsaD. Hontz, 
J.C.Gill, 
Cyrus Walter, 
E. B. Beaumont, Jr., 
G. H. Simmons, 

Jas. J. Brennan, 

B. D. Kurtz, 

Walter Lusson, 

L.C. Parsons, 

Geo. B. Loop, 

Isaac Keener, 

Harry Hemphill, Emporium 

M. C. Kepler, Renovo. 

Geo. L. Kepler, Renovo. 

G. W. Roher, 

S05 Anthracite St., Shamokin, 
D. R. Lobaugh, Ridgway. 



Duke Center. 
G anere. 
Stickney. 
Moosic. 

East Mauch Chunk. 
Mechanicsburg. 

Tunkhannock. 

Lawrenceville. 

Westfield. 
Oval. 
Cammal. 
Ardmore. 
Academy. 
Sayre. 
New Bethlehem. 






THE LEAGUE OF AMERICAN SPORTSMEN. 



143 



LOCAL WARDENS IN MICHIGAN. 
County. Name of W arden. Address 



Ottawa, 

Kalamazoo, 

Berrien, 

Cass, 

Hillsdale. 



W. H. Dunham, Drenthe 
C. E. Miller, Augusta 

W. A. Palmer, Buchanan. 
Thomas Dewey, Dowagiac. 
C. A. Stone, Hillsdale. 



LOCAL WARDENS IN VIRGINIA. 
Mecklenburg, J.H.Ogburn, South Hill. 

King William, N.H Montague, Palls. 

Mnythe, J. M. Hughes, Chatham Hill. 

King & Queen, R. D. Bates, Newtown. 

Louisa, T.P.Harris, Applegrove. 

Henrico, W. J. Lynham, 412 W. Marshall 

Richmond. 
East Rockingham, EJ.Carickhoff, Harrisonburg. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WYOMING. 
Fremont, Nelson Varnall, Dubois. 

| Jackson. 



Uinta, 



1 F. L. Peterson, J 
Carbon, Kirk Dyer, Medicine Bow. 

Laramie, Martin Breither, Cheyenne. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN TENNESSEE. 
Sumner, W. G. Harris, Gallatin. 

Stewart, John H. Lory, Bear Spring. 

Robertson, C.C.Bell, Springfield. 

Montgomery, P. W. Humphrey, Clarksville. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEBRASKA. 
Hall, E. C. Statler, Grand Island 

LOCAL WARDENS IN NEW HAMPSHIRE. 
Cheshire, S. C. Ellis, Keene. 

Sullivan, G. A. Blake, Lempster. 

J. W. Davidson, Charlestown. 
LOCAL WARDENS IN VERMONT. 
Rutland, Wm. J. Liddle, Box 281, Fair Haven 

Windsor, F. A. Tarbell, W est Bridgewater. 

Orleans, E.G.Moulton, Derby Line. 

Essex, H. S. Lund, Granby. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN ILLINOIS. 
Rock Island, D. M. Slottard, 12th Ave and 17th 

St., Moline. 
Iroquois, J. L. Peacock, Sheldon. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN OKLAHOMA. 
Kiowa and Comanche Nation, 

A.C.Cooper, Ft. Sill. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN IOWA. 
Clinton, D.L. Pascol, Grand Mound. 

Pottawattamie, Dr. C.Engel, Crescent. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN WASHINGTON. 
Okanogan, James West, Methow. 

Stevens Co., Jacob Martin, Newport. 

LOCAL WARDENS IN UTAH. 
Washington, S. C. Goddard, New Harmony. 

LOCAL CHAPTERS. 
Albert Lea, Minn., H.A.Morgan, Rear Warden. 
Angelica, N. Y., C. A. Lathrop, 
Augusta, Mont., H. Sherman, 
Austin, Minn., G. F\ Baird, 

Austin, Pa., W. S. Warner, " 

Boston, Mass., Capt. W. 1. Stone, " 

Buffalo, N. Y., H.C.Gardiner, 

Cammal, Pa., B. A. Ovenshire. 

Champaign, Ohio, Hy. F. MacCracken 

Urbana/ 
Charlestown, N. H., W. M. Buswell, 
Cheyenne, Wyo., J. Hennessy, 
Choteau, Mont., j G. A.Gorham, " 

Cincinnati, Ohio, B.W.Morris, " 

Coudersport, Pa., 1. L. Murphy, 
Cresco, Iowa, J. L. Piatt, " 

Davis, W.Va., J. Heltzen, " 

Dowagiac, Mich., W. F. Hoyt, " 

East Mauch Chunk,Pa., E. F. Pry, " 

Evansville, Ind., F. M. Gilbert, 
Fontanet, Ind., W. H. Perry, " 

Ft. Wayne, Ind., W. L. Waltemarth " 

Great Falls, Mont., J. M. Gaunt, " 

Heron Lake, Minn., K. C. Buckeye, " 

Hollidaysb'g, Pa., H.D.Hewit, " 

Hopkinsville, Ky., Hunter Wood, " 

Indianapolis, Ind., Joseph E. Bell, " 

Jerome, Ariz., Dr. L. A. Hawkins, " 

Jorinsonburg, Pa., W. J. Stebbins, " 

Kalispell, Mont., John Eakright, " 

Keene, N. H., F. P. Beedle, 

Kingfisher, Okla., A.C.Ambrose, " 



-ake Co., Ind., 
Loganpsort, Ind., 
Lucungton, Mich., 
Mechanicsburg, Pa., 
Minturn, Colo., 
New Albany, Ind., 
New Bethlehem, Pa 
Penn Yan, N. Y., 
Princeton, Ind., 
Reynoldsville, Pa., 
Ridgway, Pa., 
Rochester, N. Y., 
St. Paul, Minn., 
St. Thomas, Ont., 
Schenectady, i\ . Y., 
Seattle, Wash., 
Syracuse, N. Y., 
Terre Haute, Ind , 
The Dalles, Ore., 
Walden, N. Y-, 
Wichita, Kas., 
Winona, Minn., 



Dr. R. C. Mackey, Rear Warden. 

E. B. McConnell, 

G. R. Cartier, " 

Dr.J. H.Swartz, " 

A. B. Walter, 

Dr. J. F. Weathers, 

., Isaac Keener, 

Dr. LU R. Phillips, 

H. A. V eager, " 

C. F. Hoffman, 

T. J. IVi axwell, 

C. H. McChesney 

O. T. Denny, •■ 

L.J.Hall, ■» 

J. W. Furnside. " 

M. Kelly, u 

C.C.Truesdell, 

C. F. Thiede, " 

C. B. Cushing, M 

J. R. Hays, 

Gerald Volk, 

C. M. Morse, 



DISCOUNTS TO LEAGUE MEMBERS. 

The following firms have agreed to give 
members of the L. A. S. a discount of 2 
per cent, to 10 per cent, on all goods bought 
of them. In ordering please give L. A. S. 
number: 

Syracuse Arms Co., Syracuse, N. Y. Guns. 
Davenport Fire Arms Co., Norwich, Conn. Shot 

guns, rifles. 
Gundlach Optical Co., Rochester, N. Y. Photographic 

goods. 
Blair Camera Co., Rochester, N.Y. Photographic goods. 
The Bostwick Gun and Sporting Goods Co., 1526 

Arapahoe St., Denver, Col. 
James Acheson, Talbot St.. St. Thomas, Ontario, 

Sporting goods. 
Jespersen & Hines, 10 Park Place, New York City 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE LEAGUE. 

W. D. Ellis, 136 W. 72d street, New York City. 
A. F. Rice, 155 Pennington avenue, Passaic, N. J. 
Dr. W. A. Valentine, 5 W. 35th street, New York 

City. 
A. A. Anderson, 6 E. 38th street, New York City. 
A. V. Fraser, 478 Greenwich street, New York 

City. 

E. S. Towne, care National Bank Book Co., Hol- 

yoke, Mass. 

F. G. Miller, 108 Clinton street, Defiance, Ohio. 
Gen. J. F. Pierson, 20 W. 52d street, New York 

City. 
E. T. Seton, 80 W. 40th street, New York City. 
J. H. Seymour, 35 Wall street. New York City. 
A. G. Nesbitt, Maple street, Kingston, Pa. 
D. C. Beard, 204 Amity street, Flushing, L. I. 

C. H. Ferry, 1720 Old Colony Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Hon. Levi P. Morton, 681 5th avenue, New York 

City. 
H. Williams, P. O. Box 156, Butte, Mont. 

D. B. Fearing, Newport, R. I. 

E. H. Dickinson, Moosehead Lake, Me. 
Lorenzo Blackstone, Norwich, Conn. 

A. L. Prescott, 90 W. Broadway, New York City. 

G. S. Edgell, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
W. B. Mershon, Saginaw, Mich. 

Hon. H. W. Carey, East Lake, Mich. 

George Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 

Andrew Carnegie, 2nd, Fernandina, Fla. 

Morns Carnegie, Fernandina, Fla. 

W. L. Underwood, 52 Fulton street, Boston, Mass. 

C. E. Butler, Jerome, Ariz. 

Mansfield Ferry, 183 Lincoln Park, Boulevard, 

Chicago, 111. 
Austin Corbin, 192 Broadway, New York City. 
J. Stanford Brnwn, 241 South 5th street, Reading, Pa. 
W. H. Smith. Bryn Mawr, Pa. 
E. B. Smith, Bourse Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 

There are thousands of men in the 
United States who should be life mem- 
bers. Why don't they join? Will some- 
one please take a club and wake them up? 



144 



RECREATION. 



A NEW CHAPTER. 

Another evidence of the value of energy 
comes from far-off Kingfisher, Oklahoma. 
Some weeks ago Mr. F. D. Dakin, a live 
sportsman of that town, made up his mind 
to organize a chapter of the League there. 
He went out, rounded up the boys, sent in 
2,2 applications for membership, with check 
to cover, and the chapter was promptly 
organized. Now the country is being 
patrolled day and night by the members 
of the chapter and the first man who kills 
a bird or catches a fish out of season in 
that vicinity will find himself in trouble. 
The members of the Kingfisher chapter 
are in dead earnest in this matter, and it 
is safe to say there will be no more illegal 
shooting or fishing or shipping of game in 
that country from this day. 
, Here is a list of the members of the 
Kingfisher chapter : 

F. D. Dakin, G. A. Nelson, R. J. Kester, 
J. S. Patrick, P. Houck, R. D. Hunt, G. 
Longandyke, G. H. Hart, A. C. Ambrose 
(rear warden), C. E. McKinley, E. G. 
Spillman, J. C. Cross, G. W. Mitchell, H. 
C. Rising, David Jackson, S. D. Calhoun, 
H. C. Wilson, H. Humphreys, H. E. 
Moore V. A. Brennan, C. P. Wickmiller, 
A. J. Harris, R. O. Copeland, J. Q. Hart, 
Geo. James, J. A. Banker, J. L. Admire, 
Jos. Kauffman, Hy. Simpson, Wilbur Shid- 
aker. J. V. Admire, H. W. Thies. If there 
are any other sportsmen anywhere who 
wish to save their game and game fishes 
from destruction, let them follow the ex- 
ample of the Kingfisher crowd. 

BAGGED GAME LAW VIOLATORS. 

A short time ago Game Warden Quimby re- 
ceived information that parties from Oregon City 
were hunting deer with hounds on the head- 
waters of the Clackamas. A week ago he sent 
Special Deputy Warden J. J. Kelly to look into 
the matter. Mr. Kelly made a .75-mile trip on 
horseback to near the upper hatchery, where he 
found the hunters' camp, and waited there till they 
came from the day's hunting, with 3 dead deer 
and a pack of hounds. There was also one deer 
in camp when he got there. He confiscated the 
carcasses, arrested John Howland and Seth Aus- 
tin, and arrived at Oregon City with thern Fri- 
day. They were arraigned in the Justice Court, 
pleaded guilty, and were fined $25 each. The 
poor deer are naturally lean at this time of year, 
but men out trapping kill them, dry part of the 
flesh, and use some to bait their traps. Austin is 
an old offender in this line. The arrest of these 
men will serve as a warning to all of that kind 
to stop their violations of the game law, as there 
is always some timber cruiser or party of sur- 
veyors in the mountains who will inform on them. 
— Portland Oregonian. 

Mr. L. P. Q. Quimby is the chief warden 
of the Oregon division of the L. A. S. 
More power to his elbow. 



certain violators of the game laws. A firm at 
Pilot Mound, charged with the illegal marketing of 
game birds, were arrested and tried before a jus- 
tice of the peace. They were found guilty and 
fined $151.50, including costs. They paid the bill, 
and it is presumed they will henceforth have 
greater respect for the majesty of the law. 

From Pilot Mound Mr. Lincoln went to Som- 
ers, in Calhoun county, where a dealer was fined 
$76.50 for shipping game birds out of the State. 
He, also, liquidated. — Iowa paper. 

Mr. Lincoln is a member of the League 
and this is the kind of stuff that all good 
League members are made of. — Editor. 



Ducks are plentiful in many localities 
near Seattle. They swim around the over- 
flowed fields, gazing at our L. A. S. reward 
posters. 1 hey seem to know they are pro- 
tected. The close season on ducks begins 
March 1st. Not a shot is fired at them. 
And. The League Did It. 

Frank A. Pontius, Seattle, Wash. 



The Hon. Wm. Sulzer, Member of Con- 
gress from New York City, has joined the 
League. We are steadily gaining ground in 
the councils ?f the nation, and I trust the 
day may not oe far distant when a major- 
ity of the members of both Houses of 
Congress will belong to the League. 



LEAGUE NOTES. 

Boone, Iowa. — George A. Lincoln, of Cedar 
Rapids, State Game Warden, has been sojourning 
in this section of the State, much to the sorrow of 



Mr. E. F. Smith, a League member, of 
Hinton, W. Va., acting under the Lacey 
law, seized 14 lots of game in December 
last that had been delivered to the express 
company for shipment out of the State in 
violation of law. The offenders are being 
prosecuted. 

LONGING LOO. 

ZEB YAHOO. 

A man there was in Kalamazoo 
Who longed for a land where there's noth- 
ing to do ; 
Where the sun shines every day in the year 
Where music's the only thing you hear; 

Where giants and monsters and googoos 

dwell, 
Where fairies flit and Zulus yell; 
A bungaloo of real bamboo 
In the jungles wild of Timbuctoo. 

He wanted to play with a real hoodoo, 
To ride a mile on a wild gozoo 
With a yellow girl he would call "Loo-loo," 
Who'd sing to him of the great Ya-boo. 

So they took him to ride on a wild choo- 

choo 
With a pack of wolves from the New York 

Zoo ; 
But they didn't take along Loo-loo, 
And the man he wept, "Boo-hoo, boo-hoo!" 



FORESTRY. 



EDITKl) BY DR B. E. FERNOW, 

Director of the New York School of Forestry, Cornell University, assisted by Dr. John C. Gifford of the same 

institution. 

It takes thirty yeari- to grow a tree and thirty minutes to cut it down and destroy it. 



FORESTRY AND THE NEW YORK STATE 
CONSTITUTION. 

An attempt was made this winter in the 
Legislature of the State of New York to 
pass a resolution bringing before the peo- 
ple for vote a partial repeal of Article 
VII of the State constitution. 

It failed, undoubtedly through the strong 
opposition of influential men represented 
in the Association for the Protection of 
the Adirondacks, and in the New York 
Board of Trade, both of which bodies 
made a short, but determined campaign 
against the attempts to change the consti- 
tution in this particular. 

Article VII reads : "The lands of the 
State constituting the forest preserve 
now fixed by law shall be forever kept as 
wild lands. They shall not be leased, 
sold or exchanged, or be taken by any 
corporation, public or private, nor shall 
the timber thereon be sold or removed or 
destroyed." 

The resolutions on which the people were 
to be asked to vote provided for the leas- 
ing of camp sites, and for the sale and re- 
moval of softwood timber, 10 inches and 
more in diameter, and the building of roads, 
an under Legislative control ; or, as the 
resolution in the Assembly expresses it, 
"the constitution shall not be construed to 
forbid the cutting of timber according to 
a system of scientific forestry." 

Now, since by the failure of these reso- 
lutions the matter is again removed from 
the arena of politics to that of academic 
discussion, it will be possible, without 
charge of a desire to influence legislation 
one way or the other, to review the situa- 
tion and try to sound the logical elements in 
it. 

The arguments against change advanced 
by the Board of Trade in the memorial of 
its Committee on Forestry, are based on 
3 propositions, namely: 

Distrust in the ability of the Forest 
Commission and the Legislature to con- 
trol proper cutting of timber. 

The importance of the forest cover 
for the protection of the watershed, which 
makes all cutting of timber undesirable. 

The impropriety of leasing camp sites 
by which tne public at laree is kept out 
from enjoying this public property. 

The Association for the Protection of 
the Adirondacks, mainly composed of 
owners of camps or game preserves in the 
Adirondacks. or of members of clubs own- 
ing such, add in their appeal for assistance 



us 



in staving off proceedings the following 
arguments : 

That the restriction to 10 inches is 
not adequate, and that removal of the 
snruce to that diameter would impair the 
protective function of the forest cover. 

That the culling of spruce would make 
much debris and thereby increase the dan- 
ger from fire. 

They also harp on the impairment of 
water supplies and increased danger from 
floods by denudation of the forest cover. 

Finally, and in particular, they bring for- 
ward the argument : 

That lumbering in the Forest Preserve 
would be a violation of good faith with 
those who have sold to the State lands 
adjoining their own in the expectation that 
the constitutional prohibition of the re- 
moval of timber will be maintained and, 
therefore, that their own property will not 
be jeopardized by logging operations, 
with the attending danger from fire. 

Let us look at the situation as it- is at 
present, and then at the arguments, separ- 
ately, against a change. 

We are neither in sympathy with the 
article of the constitution which prevents 
the State from a rational use of its property, 
excluding even its improvement by forest 
planting or otherwise; nor with the pro- 
posed changes which attempt to remedy 
this anomalous condition by one sided, 
half hearted, crude and ill advised meas- 
ures, instead of proposing a well digested, 
comprehensive plan for the management 
of this important State property. 

The State now owns over i]4. million 
acres of forest land, and it is the 
expressed policy to add gradually to 
it until 3 million acres, more or less, 
shall be in the preserve. By the consti- 
tutional provision, the people have volun- 
tarily deprived themselves of using this 
vast property for anything but sporting 
purposes, and as a soil cover to protect the 
water sunoly. Not only may none of the 
valuable materials grown in these woods 
be utilized, but they may not even be im- 
proved by weeding or cleaning up ; nor, if 
the constitution is strictly interpreted, 
would it be permissible to plant and regain 
for useful production to forest any waste 
or burnt places ; for these woods are to 
be keot as wild lands. 

Any European who is acquainted with 
the forest management in his country, who 
knows that every forest growth should be 
treated like a crop, harvested and repro- 



I4<5 



RECREATION. 



duced, and that no danger to the water- 
shed need be feared where this is done 
properly and persistently, would smile at 
the folly exhibited by a people reputed to 
be of a practical turn of mind, in pre- 
venting such rational forestry practice. 

Any rational, thinking man, not a sports- 
man or pleasure seeker, visiting this region 
and studying its conditions, will not hesi- 
tate long in deciding on the proper 
economics in the management of this 
property. 

Theoretically, at least, he will have to 
admit that more enjoyment for a larger 
number, more benefit to the community, 
present and future, can be derived from it 
by using it as European forest prop- 
erties are being used, than by the let-alone 
policy. Practically, however, he may admit 
that the methods of utilization now pro- 
posed by the Legislature and the manner 
of administration to be practiced do not 
lead in that direction. 

Leaving out of consideration the ques- 
tion of leasing camp sites, which, under 
certain conditions, might be done with ad- 
vantage and without detriment, let us see 
what the removal of the spruce to 10-inch 
diameter means. It means making an inroad 
on the valuable assets stored in this 
State property. It is a financial policy, 
only; not a policy to preserve or 
improve or reproduce the forest prop- 
erty ; not a comprehensive forest policy. 
It says : Let us take out what we can profit- 
ably sell, using the funds for any other 
desirable or undesirable purpose, leaving 
the property by so much poorer, by so 
much more difficult for the future forestry 
management to restore to desirable condi- 
tion. 

For a private owner, who is mainly con- 
cerned in his present financial condition; 
for a State which is in financial distress 
and in need of funds immediately available, 
such a policy may be quite rational. 
For a great State, rich in resources and 
strong financially, it is not commendable. 

The State of New York can afford to be- 
gin a forest management on a broader 
basis, which looks at the interest of the 
future even more than of the present. For- 
est management, carried on for continuity, 
always involves foregoing present advant- 
ages or incurring present expenditures, 
making present investments for the sake 
of future advantages, future incomes, fu- 
ture returns of investments; in other 
words, it must make sacrifices for the 
present, more or less, to be made good in a 
distant future. That is the reason why the 
State is to engage in such management; it 
has the obligation to provide for the future 
as well as the present ; it is long-lived 
enough to secure the benefits resulting from 



abstemiousness and economy, or from pres* 
ent investments. 

The proper policy for a virgin forest, to 
be managed for future benefits, is to re- 
move it more or less rapidly and replace it 
by some better crop, which will protect the 
soil better and furnish a superior amount 
of useful wood material. The rapidity 
with which this change from the ragged 
and unprofitable forest of nature to the 
economic forest of man is to be made and 
the methods to be employed depend on 
financial, economic and natural conditions. 
In any case, it is a process of slow and 
gradual evolution, during which the inter- 
ests of the present must also be taken into 
account. 

Such a management requires a careful, 
far sighted plan before it is put into execu- 
tion, and a fit and well organized adminis- 
tration. 

We must agree with the first argument 
of the Board of Trade, supported by a 
statement of experiences, which expresses 
at length doubt of the ability of a com- 
mission of political appointees without 
technical training to supervise efficiently a 
technical management which contemplates 
continuity of plan and performance. As re- 
gards the doubtful expedient of hampering 
the administrative body by legislative con- 
trol in such management, the memorial 
wisely says : 

"No man, by his election as a member 
of the Legislature, is thereby endowed with 
any greater wisdom than he possessed as 
private citizen. The question arises, there- 
fore, is it safe, in the present condi- 
tion of knowledge on the forest question, 
to confide the care of the forests to the 
Legislature, as is to be done under the 
pending amendments?" 

A change of method in administration, 
then, would seem to be required before a 
change in the use of the Forest Preserve 
can appear desirable. 

The State can wait for enlightenment, 
and the time, no doubt, will arrive when a 
technical forest management such as we are 
acquainted with in all European countries, 
Japan and India may be organized. 

Regarding the arguments which refer to 
the influence of forest cover on soil and 
water conditions, and the supposition that 
the removal of the spruce would be a dam- 
age from that point of view, we can not 
agree that in most cases such culling 
would be detrimental directly. There is 
altogether too much loose talk and gen- 
eralization on this subject of forest in- 
fluences. 

If the lumberman really denuded the 
steep mountain slopes, and if the soil on 
such slopes were really exposed to sun, 
wind and rain for some time without re- 



FORESTRY. 



14; 



covering itself with vegetation, the results 
might indeed be disastrous. But these con- 
ditions are rare. 

Indirectly, however, they may be in- 
duced by the fires which are so likely to fol- 
low the lumberman. These destroy the 
forest floor, which is the most essential 
factor in the problem of water conserva- 
tion, and, if recurring, prevent the reestab- 
lishment of a vegetable cover ; soil washes 
begin and accumulate, and finally absolute 
denudation and its evil consequences are 
the result. 

The main argument, then, against lum- 
bering of any kind is not rationally be- 
cause of the cutting and utilizing of the 
wood materials, but because of the leaving 
of debris and the increased danger of fire, 
the one being supposed to be a necessary 
concomitant of the other. 

If this danger could be avoided — and it 
really can be at least minimized — there 
would in most cases be no objection to the 
harvesting of the merchantable trees from 
consideration of the needs of water protec- 
tion. Without change in the methods of 
logging and in the manner of administering 
protection against forest fires, we agree that 
it is practically best to defer logging on 
State lands until these changes and this 
protection can be assured, and until a com- 
prehensive plan, including the whole State 
property, in its scope on the lines indicated, 
can be proposed. 

When that time shall arrive, when a ra- 
tional forest management is to be inaugu- 
rated, the sixth reason, which appears 
rather specious, namely, that the State is 
impliedly under obligation to keep its 
property for ever in a wild state to please 
adjoiners, will probably not even be raised. 



TREE PLANTING IN THE ARID REGIONS. 

Port Arthur, Texas. 
Editor Recreation : 

After a perusal of the article by Mr. Geo. 
E. Walsh, reprinted from Harper's Weekly 
in February Recreation, I feel constrained 
to add my mite to the discussion by saying 
a few words touching "Trees for the 
Prairies." I lived for 12 years in South- 
west Kansas, and the efforts made by the 
settlers to grow forest trees under the tim- 
ber culture laws then in force showed how 
futile any further experimentation along 
those lines is likely to prove, even though 
conducted by skilled arboriculturists in 
scientific ways. That the efforts of the 
settlers were in most instances made in 
good faith, carried on through years of 
disappointing toil, is beyond question. 
That they failed in every instance to grow 
trees of any size is equally patent. After 
giving the matter some thought, I arrived 
at the conclusion that the main trouble lay 



in the fact that no attempt was ever made 
to grow trees in the places that were most 
likely to make the effort successful. 
Throughout that countrv there are thou- 
sands of acres, as Mr. Walsh says, among 
the sand hills that are absolutely worth- 
less. If tree culture could be made to 
succeed at all, and I believe it could if at- 
tempted on a large enough scale, it would 
be in those regions. The principal draw- 
back is the lack of sufficient moisture. By 
planting the trees in the valleys that lie be- 
tween these hills every inch of rainfall on 
the level will be augmented 10 to 12 
inches by the wash from the hillsides. 
After the ground has been broken by the 
plow, even so great an amount of moisture 
as this will be absorbed in a few hours, 
to be drawn on for weeks and months 
by the growing trees. With these nuclei 
the forest could be made to climb the hill- 
sides gradually and creep out on the level 
plains themselves ; and by holding and con- 
serving the moisture, bring about such 
conditions as would increase the rainfall 
and drive the arid region back to the 
foothills of the Rockies. If the govern- 
ment will profit by the mistakes made by 
the settlers and try tree culture where 
30 to 40 inches of water can be counted on 
every year as a helper I see no reason why 
success should not crown its efforts. To 
plant trees, of any variety, elsewhere will 
be a waste of time and labor. 

Once the trees are started in the valleys, 
and they should be planted thickly, they 
would catch and hold the. snows of winter 
as well as the rains of spring and sum- 
mer. I had a garden in one of these val- 
leys with a solid board fence on the North. 
I have seen the snow drifted in until 
the garden was filled to the height of the 
fence, and if it had been 12 feet high the 
drifted snow would have been of that 
depth. I have not infrequently seen the 
water standing a foot deep in that garden 
from a rain that could not have exceeded 
one inch on the level, and the valley was 
like many others in that locality. 

One of the principal reasons why tim- 
ber culture has always failed in the plains 
country is that there is no moisture in the 
subsoil. It is bone dry from the surface 
clear down to the water-bearing strata, 
one foot to 200 feet below the surface, 
and in many places much more. It is 
this lack of sub-surface moisture that 
brings death to trees that attain any size. 
While the trees are small and the roots 
are confined to the surface, the ordinary 
rainfall will be ample to keep the little tree 
living; but as soon as it becomes a tree, and 
attempts to draw from a greater depth for 
its moisture, it succumbs to starvation. 

C. M. Davis.. 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 

" What a Man Eats He Zr." 

Edited by C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D. 

Author of " On Citraconic, Itaconic and Mesaconic Acids," " Fish as Food,'' etc. 



TOMATO CATSUP AND OTHER SAUCES. 

A. L. Winton and A. W. Ogden have 
recently studied the catsup and other 
similar sauces sold in Connecticut. They 
discuss the manufacture of such goods in 
effect as follows, calling attention especially 
to the use of artificial coloring matter and 
preservation which are so generally met 
with and which should be discouraged : 

Tomato catsup, or ketchup, is the most 
popular of the bottled table sauces on our 
market. It is found on the tables of nearly 
every hotel and restaurant, and is con- 
sumed in large quantities in families. When 
made in the household ripe tomatoes are 
pared, cored, boiled down to the desired 
consistency, and strained through a sieve 
to remove seeds. The strained pulp is 
cooked for a time with vinegar, spices, and 
other flavoring matter. Chili sauce is pre- 
pared in a similar manner from tomatoes, 
peppers (chilies), vinegar, spices, etc., but, 
unlike catsup, is not usually strained. 

Both of these sauces are bottled hot and 
closed to exclude the germs; but while the 
sterilization or the sealing is not always 
perfect, the contents of the bottles are kept 
from spoiling, during storage as well as 
during use, by virtue of the spices and 
vinegar. 

Commercial catsup, chili sauce, etc., are 
at least theoretically similar to the home- 
made products. Some of the catsups and 
chili sauces on the market are made from 
good materials, but others are said to be 
made from the refuse of tomato canneries 
or from other inferior pulp, and most of 
them are colored with dyes and preserved 
with chemicals. Among the colors used 
are eosin, ponceau, tropeolin, magenta and 
others of coal-tar origin. They impart to 
the sauces a brilliant red color which those 
who are unaware that the uncolored prod- 
ucts have a dull red or brown color believe 
is due to the natural color of the fruit. 
The objections to the use of these dyes are: 
First, they deceive the purchasers while 
they in no way improve the quality of the 
sauce ; second, they may serve to hide in- 
ferior material used in their manufacture; 
third, they are possibly injurious to health; 
and, fourth, they put genuine uncolored 
goods at a disadvantage in the market. 

The chemicals commonly employed as 
preservatives are salicylic acid, salicylate of 
soda, benzoic acid and benzoate of soda. 
The preserving agent actually present in 
the product is the same, whether one of 
these acids or its soda salt is used, since 



the free acid of the tomato liberates the 
acid of both the salicylate and the benzoate 
of soda. The use of any of these preserva- 
tives in catsups and sauces without inform- 
ing the purchaser of its presence is a viola- 
tion of the Connecticut and some other 
State pure food laws. 

During the present year 106 samples of 
catsup, chili sauce and other sauces sold in 
Connecticut were tested for both dyes and 
chemical preservatives, and in addition de- 
terminations of total solids and acidity 
were made. Of these only 21 contained no 
added preservatives. Of the 95 samples 
with added preservatives, 67 contained 
benzoic acid, probably added in most cases 
as sodium benzoate, and 18 contained sali- 
cylic acid. The tests showed that only 20 
brands were free from added dyes, and 
that 85 brands contained them. Of these 
latter goods 31 brands were colored with 
eosin, the common dye of red ink; 47 with 
ponceau, 3 with tropeolin, and 3 with other 
coal-tar dyes. The percentage of total 
solids, that is, food material, in the tomato 
catsups ranged from 6.03 to 42.64. The 
water ranged from 57.36 to 93.97 per cent. 
The acidity of the samples, that is, one of 
the most marked flavors, ranged from 0.60 
to 2.20 per cent. Otherwise expressed, 
some of the samples were 7 times as con- 
centrated and nearly 4 times as sour as 
others. 

In the chili sauces, the total solids 
ranged from 12.02 to 37.36 per cent, and 
the acidity from 0.80 to 1.60 per cent. 



MARKETING MUSKMELONS. 
Western muskmelons are sold in large 
numbers in the Eastern market. They 
are well graded and uniform in quality, and 
these points of excellence have greatly as- 
sisted their popularity. Nearness to mar- 
ket is an important factor in the case of a 
tender-fleshed, delicately favored fruit like 
the muskmelon, and for this reason within 
a few years, a melon industry of consider- 
able magnitude has been developed in Niag- 
ara county, New York. As a rule, the 
cultivation of the fruit has been restricted 
to the market-gardening regions adjacent 
to the large cities. The industry has de- 
veloped naturally owing to favorable soil 
and climatic conditions. The soil ranges 
from light sandy loam on the "ridge" to 
clay loam on the lower levels. The light 
soil produces early melons of fine quality, 
to secure which special means are em- 
ployed. 



148 



PURE AND IMPURE FOODS. 



149 



For the early crop the plants are started 
in hothouses and transplanted to the field, 
being carefully cultivated and protected 
from insect enemies and fungous diseases. 
The chief advantage of the house-grown 
plant lies in the increased earliness of the 
product. Sometimes there is little differ- 
ence in the time of the maturity of the 
first fruits, but the main crop from set 
plants, it is claimed, is always considerably 
in advance of that from seed sown in the 
open. 

According to Professor Craig, of the 
Cornell University Experiment Station, 
who has devoted much time to a study of 
the industry, to know just when to pick a 
muskmelon is a matter of judgment ac- 
quired by practical experience. Each vari- 
ety has its characteristic coloring when ripe. 
The stem end of the fruit colors and soft- 
ens first, and the melon must be picked 
before it has softened at this critical poinr. 

It is as important to grade melons as 
peaches or apples, and no progressive fruit 
grower now thinks of marketing such 
fruits without grading them. Grading 
melons according to size has a distinct ad- 
vantage for the buyer, since it frequently 
happens that one consumer wishes a small 
size, while another prefers larger ones. The 
work of grading and packing is done best 
in the packing house, or in a shaded cor- 
ner of the field. 

In Western New York 3 types of pack- 
ages are used for muskmelons, namely, 12- 
pound baskets, bushel baskets and crates. 
The 12-pound basket usually holds 16 mel- 
ons, while the bushel basket and crate hold 
30 to 45 melons each. A favorite crate 
measures 9x11x22 inches. Baskets are neat 
in appearance and easily handled, but are 
not suitable for shipment to distant mar- 
kets. For long-distance shipment the crate 
is undoubtedly the best package, economy of 
space and ease of handling considered. In 
Western New York most of the product is 
shipped by canal boat. Small melons like 
Netted Gem pack nicely in 12-pound bas- 
kets, while the larger varieties are more 
conveniently handled in bushel baskets. 



FOOD VALUE OF BUCKWHEAT. 
The grain of buckwheat and its various 
by-products are used to a limited extent for 
feeding farm animals, as are also the green 
plant and the straw. Buckwheat flour and 
grits are used as human food. The plants 
are sometimes grown as bee-plants for the 
honey they furnish, the Japanese buck- 
wheat being especially satisfactorv for this 
purpose. The buckwheat grain has the 
following percentage composition : Water, 
12.6; protein, 10; fat, 2.2; nitrogen free 
extract, 64.5 ; crude fiber, 8.7 ; and ash, 2. 
It contains rather more crude fiber and 



less nitrogen free extract than other com- 
mon cereal grains. 

The hulls are woody and have no value 
as food. Buckwheat flour is proportionally 
richer in nutrients than the whole seed, 
as the crude fiber is practically all removed 
in milling. Buckwheat flour is used largely 
in this country for making griddle cakes or 
pancakes, less commonly as breadstuff and 
in other ways. Much is used in the manu- 
facture of pancake flour, which consists of 
a mixture of flour, salt, and baking powder, 
so that the cakes may be made by simply 
mixing the material with water or milk to 
a proper consistency. 

In Russia buckwheat porridge is a com- 
mon article of diet, being eaten in large 
quantities by the peasants in certain 
regions. Buckwheat flour is often adulter- 
ated with wheat middlings. Buckwheat has 
been used for brewing and for the manu- 
facture of distilled liquors. 



BREAD FRUIT. 

Bread fruit is a common article of diet in 
the West Indian islands, Hawaii, and other 
tropical regions. According to a Hawaiian 
report it is similar to the banana as regards 
general chemical character. In the Sand- 
wich islands the tree produces generally 2 
crops of fruit, but the successive ripening 
periods are short and the fruit can not be 
kept after it ripens. When just ripe the 
fruit contains little sugar. If picked at that 
stage it has a fibrous texture suggesting 
lightness and resembles somewhat a loaf of 
wheat bread. The flavor is agreeable and 
characteristic, yet suggesting slightly that 
of old chestnuts. Before the fruit is fully 
ripe it is dry and flavorless. As it ripens 
the starch in it changes rapidly to sugar 
and a peach-like aroma is developed. The 
fragrance is unaccompanied by any corre- 
sponding flavor, and is wholly dissipated in 
cooking. The pulp of the fruit if cooked 
at this stage is soft and somewhat gummy, 
yet it is said that many persons prefer it at 
this stage on account of its pronounced 
sweetness. A Hawaiian chemist found that 
bread fruit pulp contained 68 per cent 
water, 1.03 per cent sugar, and 0.83 per cent 
ash, the chief ash constituents being chlor- 
ides and sulphates. 

Attempts have been made in Jamaica to 
produce a bread fruit flour similar to that 
which is made by drying and grinding 
bananas. This may assume commercial im- 
portance in the future, though it is doubtful 
if it is made in any considerable quantity at 
the present time. 



I have read your magazine ever since it 
was first published, and consider it the 
best sportsmen's journal published. 

Geo. H. Reimers, New York. 



PUBLISHER'S NOTES. 



A NEW IDEA IN HAMMERS. 

The Savage Arms Company, of Utica, 
N. Y., has just acquired the right to manu- 
facture and sell the Magazine and Magnet- 
ic Tack Hammer, the invention of Mr. 
Arthur W. Savage, the inventor of the fa- 
mous Savage repeating rifle. The Magnet- 
ic hammer is the best of the kind on the 
market, having a permanent horseshoe 
magnet, being strong and practical. The 
Magazine tack hammer is particularly in- 
tended to save the thumbs and fingers of 
the weaker sex, who often suffer, from 
lack of skill, in aiming the uncertain ham- 
mer. The new hammer is simple. All 
that is necessary is to pull the trigger with 
the forefinger and then release it. This 
places a tack from the magazine on the 
face of the magnet, which forms the strik- 
ing face of the hammer, where it is held 
until it is driven by one or more blows. It 
readily enables anyone to tack up decor- 
ative material on the side of a room, on 
the ceiling, or in any other position which 
is generally considered difficult when using 
the ordinary tack hammer. The Magazine 
hammer requires only one hand to operate, 
thus leaving the other hand free for hold- 
ing the material to be tacked. 

The tacks can be placed in the magazine 
of the hammer either one at a time or with 
one movement of the loader which goes 
with each hammer. Everything is simple 
and in plain sight, and if once used the 
device is considered indispensable. 

HUNTING SUITS THAT SUIT. 
I have had H. J. Upthegrove & Son, 
Valparaiso, Ind., make me 2 suits of hunt- 
ing clothing; one of moleskin and the other 
of heavy duck. I wore these clothes on a 
recent trip in the mountains and subjected 
them to hard service in mountain climb- 
ing, crawling through jungles of dead 
brush, through windfalls, wading snow 3 
feet deep, etc. It is a pleasure to me to be 
able to say that the goods proved entirely 
satisfactory in every way, and I feel war- 
ranted in advising all sportsmen who want 
clothing of the right kind to order from 
Upthegrove. If you will write him he will 
send you measurement blanks which you 
can fill out, and to which he will work. It 
would be well, in all such cases, to have a 
tailor make the measurements, and any 
tailor who makes your everyday clothes, 
or your Sunday clothes, would be glad to 
do this for you, inasmuch as the hunting- 
clothing would probably not be in his line. 
However, if this is not practicable, you 
can have a friend measure you, and Upthe- 
grove will do the rest. You may be as- 



sured of fair and honorable treatment at 
his hands. When you write him, please 
say you saw his ad in Recreation. 



R. H. Ingersoll & Bro., whose main 
store is at 67 Cortlandt St., New York, 
have opened a branch house at 25 West 
42d St., New York, where they will keep 
a full line of tennis and golf goods, boats, 
canoes, guns, rifles, revolvers, fishing 
tackle, cameras, photo supplies, baseball, 
gymnasium and track suits, etc. Their 
goods have become so well known to read- 
ers of Recreation that it is only necessary 
to announce the opening of this new branch 
in order that all sportsmen who visit New 
York via the Grand Central station may 
know just where to get their goods hand- 
ily. 



Mr. W. H. More has just accepted a po- 
sition with the Syracuse Arms Company, 
of Syracuse, N. Y., to act for them as their 
representative on the road. Mr. More was 
for 16 years connected with the H. & D. 
Folsom Arms Company of New York, and 
for 7 years was Manager of their New 
Orleans branch. He has, until within 
the last month, been special gun rep- 
resentative for Hibbard, Spencer, Bart- 
lett & Co., of Chicago. 

It is his intention to make a personal 
call on every handler of guns throughout 
the United States. 



Noyan, Quebec. 
Mr. Henry L. Jespersen, New York. 

Dear Sir: I cordially recommend your 
goods to my brother sportsmen. Y©u 
may ever count on me as one of your cus- 
tomers. Yours truly, 

E. G. Fadden. 



Chester, Vt. 
Drs. Phillips and Wrean, 
Penn Yan, N. Y. 
Dear Sirs : The hares arrived safe and 
are beauties. 

F. A. Davis. 



The Sidle telescope rifle sight which you 
kindly gave me in return for 12 subscrip- 
tions to Recreation is a source of delight 
to myself and my friends. I thank you 
for sending such a valuable premium. 

Robert Hunter, Neepawa, Can. 

I received the Ithaca gun as premium. 
It is a beauty and an excellent shooter. 
I have targeted with several sizes of shot 
and it shoots wonderfully. Thank you for 
your kindness. R. M. Wissler, 

Bellefontaine, O. 



150 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



PADDY IS OUT OF COURT. 

Pretty much everyone who reads Recrea- 
tion, and a few who do not read it, know 
that the Marlin Arms Company brought a 
libel suit against me in the Superior Court 
some 2 years ago. I employed the Hon. 
John S. Wise and his son, H. A. Wise, to 
defend. They demurred to Marlin's peti- 
tion on the ground that he had not stated 
facts sufficient to constitute a cause of ac- 
tion. Marlin's principal averment in his 
complaint was that I had written all the 
articles printed in Recreation during the 
past 3 or 4 years, criticising Marlin rifles. 
He knew, as well as he knows he is living, 
that they were all written by the men 
whose names were signed to the letters, 
and that the original letters, as printed in 
Recreation, are all on file in this office, 
ready to be produced in court at any time. 
Still, Paddy has no conscientious scruples 
against uttering a falsehood, or even against 
swearing to one. 

The case was carried up to the Supreme 
Court of the State of New York, where it 
was argued there by counsel on both sides, 
and a decision has lately been handed 
down dismissing Paddy's complaint and 
saddling the costs in all the lower courts 
on him. I quote as follows from the opin- 
ion of the Appellate Division: 

Concededly there is no precedent in the 
courts of this State for the interference 
of equity in a case of this character. 
Hence it becomes necessary to examine 
the complaint in the light of the estab- 
lished principles for the purpose of as- 
certaining whether it states a cause of ac- 
tion. 

It should be noted, first, that this com- 
plaint contains no allegation of any state- 
ment made against the character or con- 
duct of plaintiff. It hasnot been libeled. 
The words published in defendant's mag- 
azine, and for which defendant is re- 
sponsible whether written by him or an- 
other, criticise the gun manufactured t>y 
plaintiff. They do not charge that plain- 
tiff was guilty of any deceit in vending, 
or want of skill in manufacturing, the 
eun. Every statement published and of 
which complaint is made relates solely 
to the quality of plaintiff's rifles and their 
relative desirability as compared with 
rifles manufactured by others. 

The plaintiff's first excuse # for invok- 
ing the aid of equity— to avoid a multi- 
plicity of actions at law— is evidently not 
well founded, for plaintiff has not only 
failed to state facts sufficient to consti- 



tute one action at law, but it has affirma- 
tively stated facts which show that it has 
not an action at law. In such a situation 
it goes without sayiner that a court of 
equity can not be invoked to aid a plain- 
tiff unless some other ground for its in- 
terference be shown. 

The constitutional guaranty of freedom 
of speech and press, which in terms pro- 
vides that "every citizen may freely 
speak, write and publish his sentiments 
on all subjects, being responsible for the 
abuse of that right ; and no law shall be 
passed to restrain or abridge the liberty 
of speech or of the press" (State Con- 
stitution, Art. i, Sec. 8), has for its only 
limitations the law of slander and libel. 
Hitherto freedom of speech and of the 
press could only be interfered with 
where the speaker or writer offended 
against the criminal law or where the 
words amounted to a slander or libel of 
a person or corporation or their prop- 
erty, and the guaranteed right of trial by 
jury entitled the parties accused of slan- 
der or libel to have 12 men pass upon 
the question of their liability to respond 
in damages therefor and to measure such 
damages. But the precedent which the 
plaintiff seeks to establish would open 
the door for a judge sitting in equity to 
establish a censorship not only over the 
past and present conduct of a publisher 
of a magazine or newspaper, but would 
authorize such judge by decree to lay 
down a chart for future guidance in so 
far as a plaintiff's property rights might 
seem to require, and, in case of the vio- 
lation of the provisions of such a decree, 
the usual course and practice of equity 
would necessarily be invoked, which 
would authorize the court to determine 
whether such published articles were con- 
trary to the prohibitions of the decree, 
and, if so found, punishment as for a 
contempt might follow. Thus a party 
could be punished for publishing an arti- 
cle which was not libelous and that, to©, 
without a trial by jury. 

Our conclusion, r rom a review of the 
authorities, therefore, is, that all well- 
considered decisions agree in determin- 
ing it to be the law that a court of equity 
has not jurisdiction to grant the relief to 
secure which this suit was drawn. 

The order of the Appellate Division 
should be reversed and the judgment of 
the Special Term affirmed, with costs in 
all courts. 

Paddy, it's your next move. 



151 



152 



RECREATION. 



A REAL GUIDE. 

It is always a pleasure to recommend 
a good guide, and W. H. Wright, of 
Spokane, Wash., is one of that kind. He 
does not pose as a guide. He has business 
interests of his own that occupy a good 
deal of his time, yet he can frequently 
leave home for a month or 2, and in such 
cases he is willing to take parties out and 
show them where to find fish and game, 
or how to acquire health and strength. I 
recently made a trip with him in the moun- 
tains, and he proved a really great man on 
the trail. He is as strong as an ox and 
has a constitution like that of a grizzly 
bear. He will climb mountains, or chop 
trail, or pack a big load from daylight till 
dark. Then he is ready to make camp, to 
chop more wood, to cook a meal, to cut 
cedar boughs and make beds 2 feet deep ; or 
to do anything that is necessary to make 
you comfortable. He can do more useful 
things in an hour than any man I ever 
knew in camp. He is a tip top cook, an all 
around mechanic, and so good a woodsman 
that you might drop him anywhere in any 
of the great forests of this country and he 
would find his way out without making a 
mistake. 

Last summer he drove a 4 horse team 
for a tourist outfit from Ogden, Utah, to 
Portland, Oregon. In addition to this, he 
took care of all the horses, pitched the tents 
and made camp every night; did most of 
the cooking for 7 people ; mended the 
wagon or harness whenever they broke 
down ; went out and killed game or caught 
fish when needed for the table, and in fact 
was equal to any and every emergency that 
presented itself on that long journey. 

Last winter Wright took an invalid to 
Mexico and gave him a long tour over the 
plains and through the mountains of So- 
nora and Chihuahua. On that trip he drove 
team and wrangled horses; he guided, 
cooked meals when necessary, and, in fact, 
was the all around manager, secretary- 
treasurer, packer, commissary-sergeant and 
chief cook of the outfit. 

Any man who can get Wright to take 
him on a hunting or prospecting or health- 
seeking expedition is in big luck. 



A MAGAZINE FOR GAME HOGS. 

There are several editors of so-called 
Sportsmen's journals who hang around the 
outskirts of the range and try to round up 
all the game hogs that have been branded 
by Recreation. Here is the substance of 
a postal card sent out from the office of 
one of these publications : 

Dear Sir: 

Wrap a dime in this card, enclose it in 
an envelope, and mail it to us at our risk. 
We will send you a copy of the , 



the handsomest sportsman's magazine pub- 
lished. . . . There is no such word as 
"Game Hog" in our lexicon of sport. Do 
not delay. This is one of the good things 
which you should not miss. 

The statement that the editor has "no 
such word as game hog" in his lexicon is 
purely a sop to the swine. If he had 
known anything of grammar he would 
have said, "There are no such words as 
game hog," etc., instead of "there is no 
such word" ; but a man who invites game 
hogs to wallow in his yard can not be sup- 
posed to know much of the English lan- 
guage. 

Here is a copy of a letter which a 
staunch friend of game protection wrote 
the aforesaid editor, on receipt of his postal 
card: 

I have received your invitation to send a 
dime and get a copy of your journal in re- 
turn. I see plenty of self praise in your 
prospectus, but not one line to indicate that 
3'our magazine is to be devoted to game 
protection. I also note the following: 
"There is no such word as 'game hog' in 
our lexicon of sport." You would better 
revise your lexicon at once. Mr. Shields, 
through Recreation, has done more for 
game protection than all the other sports- 
men's periodicals combined, consequently 
he has the respect and support of a host of 
men and women who place game protec- 
tion before game destruction. I decline 
your invitation with thanks. 

H. M. Beck, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 



NO PROPERTY RIGHT IN GAME. 

The Supreme Court of the great State of 
California has recently handed down a de- 
cision which will prove of interest to many 
persons. It has long been held by many 
game dealers, hotel men and persons who 
do not hunt but who like to eat game, that 
any law which aims to prohibit the sale of 
game is unjust to those who do not hunt, 
is partial to hunters and may therefore be 
termed class legislation. This question has 
been adjudicated in the courts time and 
again, and the higher courts have always 
held that any State may, in the exercise of 
its police power, prohibit the sale of 
game within its borders, or trie shipment 
thereof beyond the State limits. There is 
a section of the California game laws 
which says : 

"Every person who buys, sells or offers 
or exposes for sale, barter or trade any 
quail [or certain other game] is guilty of a 
misdemeanor." 

Several game dealers of San Francisco 
held that this law was unconstitutional. 
Therefore a test case was made of it and 
taken into the courts. In deciding this case. 



EDITOR'S CORNER. 



153 



the Supreme Court heLd that all game is 
really the property of the State ; that sports- 
men kill animals only by sufferance and 
that the Legislature in granting favors can 
make what qualifications may seem proper. 
It is stated that the prohibition in refer- 
ence to the sale of game does not destroy 
a property right, because no such right 
exists. 



was paid into court and the prisoners were 
allowed to depart. The climate of Minne- 
sota is exceedingly unhealthful for game 
and fish law violators. 



NEWFOUNDLAND LICENSE LAW 
AMENDED. 

The lawmakers of Newfoundland have 
amended the game law by imposing a li- 
cense of $100 each on all non-residents 
who may see fit to hunt on that island. I 
am informed by a subscriber in St. Johns 
that this is purely the result of the swin- 
ishness displayed by many American hunt- 
ers who have gone there in years past. It 
is well known that the old law provided 
for 3 classes of license : one costing $40 
and allowing the hunter to kill 3 caribou ; 
another costing $60 and authorizing the 
killing of 5 caribou ; and still another at 
$80, under which the hunter might kill 8 
caribou. Many of our American game 
hogs, however, went over there, took out 
the cheapest license and then killed 10 
to 20, or 30, or even 50 caribou each. 
The intention of the Legislature in pass- 
ing the present law was to keep such men 
off the island entirely, and there the ac- 
tion of the lawmakers will meet the hearty 
approval of hundreds of decent men. Few 
can afford to pay the present license, and 
some honest men who would like to go 
over there and kill 3 caribou must suffer 
because of the devilish greed of the other 
kind ; but it was always thus. Honest men 
have, from time immemorial, been op- 
pressed by laws that were only intended to 
restrain thieves and cut-throats. This is 
another instance of it. 



Aenholt Stoick, Albert Paul, Henry 
Bohlman, John Kunde, Leopold Stoick and 
John Schlosser, farmers, living in Lac Qui 
Parle county, Minn., were arrested near 
Big Stone lake, in that State, in April last, 
with a seine and 3 sacks of fish in their 
possession. The sacks contained about 300 
fish, among them being a number of black 
bass. Mr. A. E. Austin, game warden, of 
Montevideo, who made the arrest, lined the 
prisoners up in court, when they demanded 
a jury trial. This was accorded them, and 
the men swore they had not been seining; 
that they had found the 3 sacks of fish on 
the river bank, and that they had simply 
been spearing suckers. The story was al- 
together too fishy for the jury, and the de- 
fendants were all found guilty as charged. 
The court fined them $25 and costs each, 
the total amounting to $192. The money 



The fish pirates about the Lewiston, 
Ohio, reservoir, were on the warpath 
again a few weeks ago. Messrs. Norvell 
and Trevison, Deputy State Game War- 
dens, raided and destroyed certain nets be- 
longing to the pirates, and the next time 
the wardens appeared on the scene 8 
shots were fired at them by men con- 
cealed in the brush about the reservoir. 
The officers were unable to get sight of the 
men so as to return the fire, but assert 
that in future they will be prepared for 
these law breakers, and if any more shoot- 
ing is done they hope to have a hand in it. 
I trust the officers may succeed in getting a 
line on the lawbreakers, and that they may 
make good, quiet corpses of them. 



Two years ago Charles Hoffman, of 
Alps, Rensselaer county, N. Y., violated 
a State game law by snaring 2 ruffed 
grouse and killing a rabbit in close season. 
The game warden got after him and Hoff- 
man left the county. A month or 2 ago 
he turned up again supposing, of course, 
the complainant had forgotten all about 
the case; but not so. Officer Brown and 
Stephen Horton, representing the Rens- 
selaer County Rod and Gun Club, swooped 
down on Hoffman, took him into court 
and a fine of $59.40 was imposed on him, 
which he paid. It would be well for Hoff- 
man to remember that law keeps a long 
time in Alps, 



A subscriber sends me a clipping from 
a Concord, N. H., paper, stating that Fred 
Higgins, Adelbert Smith and Jas. H. Du- 
rant, of North Sonbornton, assisted by 6 
dogs, killed a doe near that town in March 
last. The men were arrested, taken before 
a justice and fined $100 each. My only 
regret is that the good people of North 
Sonbornton did not then take these men, 
horsewhip them soundly, and run them out 
of town. No game law ever enacted is 
sufficiently severe on a lot of brutes who 
will run down a deer and kill it in mid- 
winter, simply because the poor brute gets 
so hungry as to come into a settlement to 
get food. 



Frank Reszka and Frank Bruski, of Wi- 
nona, Minn., have been in the habit of 
hunting in Wisconsin opposite Winona in 
close season. In March last Mr. Schultz 
game warden of Wisconsin, went after 



154 



RECREATION, 



these 2 butchers, accompanied by Elwin 
Merlin, marshal of Trempeleau. The offi- 
cers caught the 2 Polanders in their duck 
blind, took them into court, where a fine of 
$25 and 30 days in jail was assessed against 
Reszka and $20 and 20 days in jail against 
Bruski. This will give these men plenty of 
time to make up their minds whether it 
pays to violate the Wisconsin game laws, 
even if they do live in Minnesota. 



and it will serve the alleged sportsmen 
right. 



George Tucker, of Brenham, Texas, 
writes a long story to a Western sports- 
man's journal in which he tells and, in 
fact, openly boasts that he and 5 friends 
killed 5 antelope in violation of the Texas 
law. The editor of the aforesaid journal 
prints the story without a word of con- 
demnation or comment of any kind. That 
is the kind of stuff most editors of sports- 
men's journals are looking for. All they 
seem to want in the way of entertainment 
for their readers is stories of killing, 
whether legal or illegal, whether sports- 
manlike or whether the work of game 
pot. 



Charles Ferber, of Scranton, Pa., went 
trout fishing in Wayne county, in April 
last, and made a good catch. On his way 
home a game warden held him up and 
sized up his fish. Eleven of these proved 
to be less than 6 inches in length, and the 
warden ran Ferber in. A local justice of 
the peace fined him $10 for each short, 
making a total of $110, which Ferber paid 
and went on his way, a sadder but wiser 
man. He would better have waited another 
year for those trout to grow. 



Dick Rock, an old-time hunter and guide, 
who lived on the bank of Henry's lake, 
Idaho, was killed some time ago by one of 
his pet buffaloes. He had several buffaloes, 
moose, deer, etc., on his ranch and was 
very fond of them. Rock also contrib- 
uted to the cause of game protection 
and propagation by catching and shipping 
to Eastern Zoological parks, good speci- 
mens of mountain sheep, moose, buffalo, 
etc. His loss is deeply felt by all who 
knew him. 



I am informed that 30,600 deer skins 
were shipped from San Antonio, Tex., last 
winter. Yet, there are men in Texas who 
pretend to be sportsmen, and who, when 
asked to aid in any effective way in the 
procuring and enforcement of game laws, 
make all kinds cf excuses. If the sports- 
men of that State allow the slaughter to 
go on at the present rate, they will soon 
have nothing better than sparrows to shoot, 



A man in Greenwood, Miss., advertises 
3 deer dogs for sale, and states, as a rea- 
son for wishing to sell, "I have killed all 
the deer in my neighborhood." That is a 
case of a game hog and 3 hounds going 
into partnership to exterminate the game. 
Hunting, like politics, sometimes makes 
strange bed fellows. 



A CROSSING OF THE DANUBE. 

Some years ago I was one of a party 
seated around a camp fire in a Bavarian 
forest. Many stories, that would have 
taxed the credulity of any but sportsmen, 
had been told. When it came the turn of 
J., a veteran forester, he permitted his 
fancy to soar in this wise:. 

"I was hunting on the lov. r Danube in 
a forest belonging to the crown of Austria. 
My companion shot a bull elk. The ani- 
mal plunged into the river, which is there 
about 2 miles wide, crossed and lay down 
on the other shore. There was no boat 
within miles of us, but we were loath to 
lose our game. While casting about for 
means of crossing we found a patch of 
wild cucumbers. All plant life had thriven 
wonderfully that year and the fall had been 
exceedingly dry. We were therefore not 
surprised to find that some of the cucum- 
bers had reached a length of 6 or 7 feet. 
They were as dry as boards. Selecting the 
2 largest we fashioned them into boats by 
cutting holes in the tops. Then we lashed 
them together and after tying 2 dry seeds 
to sticks, to serve as paddles, we crossed 
the river, my companion in one cucumber 
boat and I in the other. 

"We found the elk apparently dead and 
having laid him across the boats, we start- 
ed to return. The additional weight sank us 
dangerously low, but as the river was only 
2 feet deep we kept on. When a few hun- 
dred yards from shore the elk, which had 
been merely stunned, recovered conscious- 
ness and kicked the boats to flinders. I 
would have taken a shot at him before he 
reached shore had I not been compelled 
to rescue my companion who could not 



swim 



But," cried the listeners, "you said the 
water was only 2 feet deep." 

"And that is quite true as regards its 
normal depth. But the carp in the Dan- 
ube are in the habit of feeding on brewers' 
grains thrown into the river. That stimu- 
lating food often makes them so dizzy that 
they spin around violently until they wear 
holes in the bottom. Some of the holes are 
10 feet deep and yards across. It was in 
one of the largest that my friend fell, so 
you can understand his danger.'" 

Petaluma, Flatwillow, Mont. 



knCREATION. 



155 



yr//£B££R T/fjir/ 

W^DfAf//iY/Sl//rf£/A 



Beer is barley-malt and hops — 
a food and a tonic. Just a touch 
of alcohol in it. 

Not a beverage known to man is 
more healthful, if the beer is right. 

'Tis the national beverage, from 
childhood up, with the sturdiest 
peoples of the earth. 

To the weak, it's essential; to 
the strong it is good. 



BUT — the beer must be pure. 

Impurity means germs, and germs multiply rapidly 
in any saccharine product like beer. 

And the beer must be old. 

Age means perfect fermentation. Without it, beer 
ferments on the stomach, causing biliousness. 



Schlitz beer is brewed in 
absolute cleanliness. 

It is cooled in a plate glass 
room, in filtered air. 

Then it is filtered; then 
aged for months in refriger- 
ating rooms. After it is bottled 
and sealed every bottle is 
sterilized. 



Not a germ can exist in it. 

These costly precautions 
have made Schlitz the stand- 
ard for purity wherever beer 
is known. 

You can get it just as well as 
common beer if you ask for it. 



Ask for the Brewery Bottling. 



RECREATION. 



Weight 

17 ounces 



Measures 

1% inches thick, 
4% inches Ivide, 
$% inches high. 



Trice 

complete 

$9.00 



' »• '» » — ■. H I, •mm mm^m,m t ^ 



Light, Small 

and 

COMPLETE 

Lightness and compactness are merits that 
are more appreciated by the camera owner 
the more he uses his camera. 

In traveling, hunting, fishing, yachting — all 
the forms of out-door life — a camera that goes 
in the pocket, weighs next to nothing, and 
takes perfect pictures is the photographic 
ideal. 

Amateurs are realizing the manifold benefits 
of using a small, good camera. Waste is 
avoided and the small plate or film negatives, 
being the work of a fine lens, make beautiful 
enlargements. The 

Pocket 



■< . . „ 



Poco 



for time or instantaneous expos- 
ures is a completely equipped 
instrument for artistic work. It 
is fitted with a rapid rectilinear 
lens, a ground glass with actuated 
spring back for the use of plates 
or films; an automatic shutter; 
a 6-inch bellows ; a perfect finder 
for snap-shot work. Examine it 
at your dealer's, or send for book 
describing the full line of Pocos 
for 1902. 

Rochester Camera and Supply Co. 

522 Poco Street, Rochester, N. Y. 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



157 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 

" For sport the lens is better than the gun. " 

I wish to make this department of the utmost 
use to amateurs. I shall, therefore, be glad to 
answer any questions and to print any items sent 
me by practical amateurs relating to their experi- 
ence in photography. 



No. 1 is entitled 
Made with a 



camera. 



Oh a 



lens. 



plate. 



7th ANNUAL COMPETITION. 

Recreation has conducted 6 amateur 
photographic competitions, all of which 
have been eminently successful. The 7th 
opened April 1st, 1902, and will close No- 
vember 30th, 1902. 

Following is a list of prizes to be 
awarded : 

First prize; A Long Focus Korona Camera 
5x7, made by the Gundlach Optical Co., Roch- 
ester, N Y., fitted with a Turner-Reich Anastig- 
mat Lens and listed at $85. 

Second prize: A No. 3 Folding Pocket Kodak, 
made by the Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, N. 
Y., fitted with a Bausch & Lomb Lens Plastig- 
mat Unicum Shutter, and listed at $61.50. 

Third prize : An Al-Vista-Panoramic Camera, 
made by the Multiscope and Film Co., Burlington, 
Wis., and listed at $40. 

Fourth prize: A Wizard C Camera, 4x5, 
made by the Manhattan Optical Co., Cresskill, 
N. J., with B. & L. Iris Diaphragm and Leather 
Carrying Case; listed at $33. 

Fifth prize: A Waterproof Wall Tent, 12 x 16, 
made by D. T Abercrombie & Co., New York, 
and Listed at $32. 

Sixth prize: A Gold Hunting Case Watch; 
listed at $50. 

Seventh prize: A Tourist Hawkeye Camera, 
4x5, and made by the Blair Camera Co., Roch- 
ester, N. Y., and listed at $15. 

Eighth prize : A Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, 
made by the Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn., and 
listed at $6. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 8x10 Carbutt Plates, made by the Car- 
butt Dry Plate Co., Wavne Junction, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 5x7 Carbutt Plates. 

The 10 next best pictures will each be awarded 
one dozen 4x5 Carbutt Plates. 

A special prize : A Goerz Binocular Field Glass, 
listed at $74.25, will be given for the best picture 
of a live wild animal. 

Subjects are limited to wild animals, 
birds, fishes, camp scenes, and to figures or 
groups of persons, or animals, repre- 
senting in a truthful manner shooting, fish- 
ing, amateur photography, bicycling, sail- 
ing or- other form of outdoor or indoor 
sport or recreation. Awards to be made 
by 3 judges, none of whom shall be com- 
petitors. 

Conditions : Contestants must submit 2 
mounted prints, either silver, bromide, 
platinum or carbon, of each subject, which, 
as well as the negative, shall become the 
property of Recreation. Negatives not to 
be sent unless called for. 

In submitting pictures, please write sim- 
ply your full name and address on the back 
of each, and number such prints as you 
may send, 1, 2, 3, etc. Then in a letter ad- 
dressed Photographic Editor, Recreation, 
say, for instance: 



Printed on - - paper. 

Length of exposure, =» 

Then add any further information you 
may deem of interest to the judges, or to 
other amateur photographers. Same as to 
Nos. 2, 3, etc. 

This is necessary in order to save post- 
age. In all cases where more than the 
name and address of the sender and serial 
number of picture are written on the back 
of prints I am required to pay letter post- 
age here. I have paid as high as $2.50 on 
a single package of a dozen pictures, in 
addition to that prepaid by the sender, on 
account of too much writing on the prints. 

Any number of subjects may be sub- 
mitted. 

Pictures that may have been published 
elsewhere, or that may have been entered 
in any other competition, not available. No 
entry fee charged. 

Don't let people who pose for you look 
at the camera. Occupy them in some other 
way. Many otherwise fine pictures have 
failed to win in the former competitions 
because the makers did not heed this warn- 
ing. 



TONING VELOX AND BROMIDE. 

In March Recreation you state that you 
can supply formula for toning Velox and 
bromide prints to a number of colors. I 
should like that formula, if you please. 
Wm. T. Perry, Worcester, Mass. 

ANSWER. 

For red, orange or brown, over expose 
10 to 20 times, and to the regular developer 
with bromide of potash add the following 
restraining solution: 

Bromide of ammonia Y ounce 

Carbonate of ammonia Vi ounce 

Water 10 ounces 

Dilute the standard M-Q developer with 
its bulk of water and add 3 drams of above 
restraining solution to each ounce of de- 
veloper used. Then develop patiently as 
the finer reds are produced, providing the 
exposure has been long, by prolonged de- 
velopment, perhaps as much as 20 minutes 
being necessary. Those who fail to obtain 
excellent results should try a much longer 
exposure than they first gave. The inter- 
mediate colors are yellow, orange and 
brown, the red, a fine Bartolozzi, coming 
last of all. When secured, rinse, fix and 
work as usual. 

Another red is obtained by immersing 
a print that has been developed and fixed 
as usual in the following: 



i5« 



RECREATION: 



(i) Water 20 cubic centimeters 

10 per cent solu- 
tion of copper 
sulphate 1 cubic centimeter 

And enough 10 per cent solution of 
ammonium carbonate to dissolve the pre- 
cipitate formed and produce a deep, clear 
blue. 

(2) 10 per cent solu- 
tion of potassi- 
um ferricya- 

nide 25 cubic centimeters 

Water 150 cubic centimeters 

Add 2 to 1. In this muddy liquid the 
black and white velox will become a rich 
red. If the solution be diluted, a purple 
may be obtained in it. 

To obtain green, after turning prints red 
mix the following bath and use it at once. 
It does not keep : 

Water 8 ounces 

Potassium ferricyanide, 10 per 

cent solution 24 minims 

Glacial acetic acid 1 ounce 

Uranium nitrate, 10 per cent so- 
lution 24 minims 

If the whites become discolored, soak 
prints in a tray of clear but not running 
water, and if a few changes of water 
should not clear the whites in 20 minutes 
immerse in a one per cent solution of 
sulphocyanide of ammonia until the whites 
bleach, which they should do rapidly. 

To obtain green, after turning prints red 
in the last bath given, immerse them in the 
following solution and then wash sparing- 
ly: 

Water 3 ounces 

Parchloride of iron, 10 per cent 
solution 30 minims 

Another green may be obtained by adding 
2 drams of a 10 per cent solution of urani- 
um nitrate to the bath given for blue. The 
green will wash off in running water, hence 
the prints should be merely rinsed in a 
tray of water. 

Blue tones are secured in the following 
bath: 

10 per cent solution of citrate of 
iron and ammonia 2 drams 

10 per cent solution of potassium 
ferricyanide 2 drams 

10 per cent solution of nitric acid. .4 drams 

Water 4 ounces 

Immerse the print until a rich blue is 
obtained, then wash well. The bath keeps. 
If to this bath is added its bulk of water, 
a blue-black will result, with grayish half- 
tones. 

Para-amidophenol developer produces 
the finest warm black tone. Use the for- 



mula with carbonate of potash given in 
the directions with the developer, or bleach 
in 

Bichloride of mercury. 12 grains 

Muriatic acid c. p 2 drams 

Water 6 ounces 

until the image is gone. Then wash well 
and immerse the print in combined toning 
and fixing bath diluted to 10 times its 
bulk. Wash well. 

Sepia tones are to be had with old para- 
amidophenol developer that has been used 
considerably, or in 

Hypo-soda 5 ounces 

Powdered alum 1 ounce 

Boiling water 25 ounces 

First dissolve the hypo, then add the 
alum. This gives a turbid solution, which 
is to be used unfiltered. The older it is the 
better, and if used hot it affords results 
that may take a day or more if used cold. 
The addition of a trifle of silver nitrate or 
some printing-out paper clippings will 
greatly improve the bath if it works slowly. 
An old bath, used cold, produces the finest 
prints, though, as stated, it works slowly. 
After the desired color is obtained, sponge 
the backs and faces of the prints well and 
wash thoroughly. E. W. N. 



BALD HEADED PICTURES. 

Formerly a blank white sky in a photo- 
graph was looked on favorably, and as 
evidence of great care in the manipulation. 
I have seen many landscape views in which 
the composition was faultless, yet the sky 
was a perfect blank, entirely destroying the 
harmony of the picture and giving a feel- 
ing of incompleteness that was aggravating. 
In negative making the actinic nature of 
the blue in the sky, although plainly seen by 
the eye, destroys the harmony or true color 
value by persistently coming up a dense 
black deposit on the negative, and even be- 
fore the other details of the picture are fully 
developed. With ordinary plates this is 
hardly possible to avoid, as the plate 
catches the actinic rays, and the eye sees 
the luminous rays. Again, the farther 
those rays have to travel the more sensitive 
they become, proof of which is that near 
objects always require a longer exposure 
than distant objects in a landscape. The 
darkest part of a cloud will reflect more 
actinic rays than the brightest part of a 
landscape, although in color value to the 
eye the cloud may appear much darker. 

Many ingenious devices have been used 
to cut off the superfluous light from the 
sky, such as a sky shade in front of the lens, 
or a diaphragm with a graduated slot pre- 
senting a full opening to the foreground 
and gradually cutting off the top light. 
These appliances work well in special cases, 



AMATEUR' PHOTOGRAPHY. 



159 



but will not answer all requirements, and 
besides, have to be adjusted for each sepa- 
rate view. Instantaneous views will, when 
the clouds are pronounced and the land- 
scape well lighted, develop simultaneously 
to something like the true value ; but in- 
stances like these are rare except in sea- 
scapes. 

Orthochromatic plates and a color screen 
will do wonders in rendering sky and land- 
scape in true color value, especially on a 
day when the sun is setting in a red and 
purple Turneresque sky, or when there is a 
soft haze over all. But on a bright sum- 
mer day, when the atmosphere is clear and 
beautiful rolling white clouds chase each 
other over a deep blue sky, the orthochro- 
matic plate and the color screen, together 
or separately, ignominiously fail to render 
anything like the effect we have tried to 
reproduce in our print. 

After trying all schemes to catch the 
fleeting cloud and the landscape together on 
the same plate, I find the only sure way 
to combine the 2, with any degree of satis- 
faction, is by the old process of double 
printing. Of course this means extra 
work in printing and the use of 2 nega- 
tives, but we have the satisfaction of being 
able to produce a picture perfectly balanced 
and complete in all its details. For ex- 
ample, take a picture showing a long stretch 
of landscape. If a suitable sky be printed 
in, shading it so as to produce the brightest 
light at the horizon and gradually darken- 
ing toward the zenith, it heightens the at- 
mospheric affect and helps the perspective 
in the picture. 

It is advisable to have a variety of cloud 
negatives on hand to avoid monotony, and 
they should also be lighted from the right 
and from the left to suit various views. 
It is not necessary to have orthochromatic 
plates on which to make the cloud nega- 
tives. In the sky there is no trace of 
color save the azure blue and the white 
of the clouds. By the use of a simple ray 
filter, dark or yellow, according to the con- 
trasts desired in the effect, the most beau- 
tiful cloud negatives can be produced on 
any make of plate or film. The yellow 
of the screen changes the blue of tne sky 
into a green, which photographs in its true 
color value and the white clouds stand out 
clearly. It is not a bad idea to have a set 
of negatives of clouds on film, as they can 
be printed from either side to suit right or 
left pictures, and if printed through the 
celluloid the softness given would be an 
improvement rather than a detriment. 

Looking at a sunlit landscape the eye 
does not first take cognizance of the clouds, 
but of the landscape, therefore the clouds 
should be printed to hi. e the same effect 
in the picture. The best effect is when the 
cloud negative is printed until the deep- 



est shadows of the clouds are just distinct- 
ly visible. Were the clouds printed in too 
strongly it would enthrall the gaze of the 
beholder to the detriment of the picture. 
Of course this is different when it is de- 
sired to render a pure cloud effect. Then 
the clouds may be printed in to the full 
strength of the rest of the view, but in this 
case it is a rule never to have the horizon 
line above one-third of the picture, the 
sky and clouds occupying the remaining 
two-thirds. — W. J. Howell, in the Camera 
and Dark Room. 



NOT SATISFIED WITH AWARDS. 

Worcester, Mass. 
Editor Recreation : 

I have read your answer to H. G. Gos- 
ney, in May Recreation. I had no inten- 
tion of making any remarks about the re- 
cent photo competition, but since seeing 
your letter I have decided to express my- 
self freely in the hope that a future contest 
may be decided with some consideration 
as to the merits of the photographs. Take 
the fishing scene that was awarded first 
prize. That is a good photograph, but I 
should like to know what the" fact that it 
was taken with an expensive lens has to 
do with the awarding of a prize. That 
same picture can be duplicated by anyone 
who has a view camera and an achromatic 
lens costing perhaps $3. An expensive lens 
is not one of the requirements of photog- 
raphy, especially on photos of that nature 
where the subjects are posed. 

Regarding the photo of the 3 deer that 
was awarded a special prize : You said in 
your answer to Mr. Gosney, "There 
are other elements that must be taken into 
account in awarding a prize to a picture 
than the difficulty of getting it." The 
other elements evidently were not taken 
into account with this photo, as its only 
redeeming feature is that it is a somewhat 
rare subject to get. I will admit that it 
was taken under unfavorable conditions, 
but in a photographic contest photographs 
are to be considered and not conditions. 
Detail is entirely lacking. The water, 
shrubbery, rocks, and practically every tree 
have been carefully engraved in by hand. 
That is not a photograph. It is an engrav- 
ing. 

The nth winner was a tame goose on 
nest. That is certainly a wonder for a 
prize winner ! The nest is made of sticks 
and the bird has a head, but both are so 
much out of focus that they are hardly 
recognizable. 

The most interesting awards of all are 
shown together on page 105 in February 
issue. "Howling Coyote" gets prize 4, 
while "Resting" gets 8. You have said that 
an expensive lens counts for a good deal 
in the awarding of a premium, yet 8th prizp 



i6o 



RECREATION. 



winner was made with a good lens while 
4th was made with a cheap achromatic, the 
lens not more than $2. You have praised 
the fishing scene because of the great detail 
and sharpness it possessed, yet you have 
given 4th prize to a photo that has no detail 
in any part of it ; while "Resting," which has 
good detail for the subject, gets only 8th. 
A coyote taken at the distance that was 
should show every hair on him, while in 
this photo the outline of the head and ears 
had to be touched up or they would hardly 
have shown. The only part of the picture 
in focus is a strip of sand about 8 feet 
back of the beast. Why should a tame pet 
coyote, all out of focus, standing against 
a background that shows nothing interest- 
ing, be awarded any place at all? The cat 
shown on the May cover and awarded 69th 
place is so far superior to the photo award- 
ed 4th that a comparison would be impos- 
sible. So much for the past competition. 
Now for the future. 

Can you not award premiums so there 
will be some degree of fairness? 

Why bar professionals from competition? 
They can not and never could take a bet- 
ter photo out of doors than an amateur. 

Photos of nests and eggs should not be 
considered. Where is there any more 
merit in one of this kind than in a simple 
view of a tree or flower? 

Judge the merits of a picture s a photo- 
graph and take into account the difficulty 
of obtaining it, but let the make of lens 
or camera with which it was taken be un- 
known to the judges. 

Have professional photographers for 
judges. Have all photos claimed to be from 
living animals or birds passed on by some- 
one who knows something of the subject. 

Do not give prizes to one who sends 
pictures of captive birds as wild ones. As 
soon as a bird becomes a captive it is the 
same as a tame one a d ought not to be 
considered. 

If you will adopt some such lines and 
have everything distinctly understood at 
the start, there will be no cause for dis- 
satisfaction. As it is now you are simply 
encouraging the taking of fraudulent 
photographs, by awarding prizes to fake 
pictures and turning down those that are 
legitimately made. Such a competition 
would be strictly fair in all particulars. 

Charles A. Reed. 



THE WORKROOM. 

Negatives distorted by tilting the camera 
and not having the necessary swing-back 
can be corrected by the following device : 
Instead of making the print by contact, 
make it by projection. Put the negative 
into an enlarging camera or any outfit used 
for making bromides. Adjust your image 



on a piece of white paper or card to the 
size you wish and then swing, or incline 
forward or backward the top of the carrier. 
If the top of the image is too narrow, tip it 
backward until the lines are straight ; if the 
top is too wide, tip it forward. Always 
have the part of the image which is too 
wide nearer to the lens than the narrower 
parts. After the perpendicular lines have 
been corrected, focus on the center of the 
image, which is about half-way between the 
2 extremes. Then stop the lens down as 
far as the other conditions will permit. 
By using F 32 to F 64 you will get suffi- 
cient depth of focus for the most severe 
cases. The so-called gaslight papers are 
too slow for this work, and a bromide 
paper of some kind must be used. It will 
work well with the same developer, but 
may require more bromide. 

To keep prints from curling it is not 
necessary to soak the whole print in a solu- 
tion of glycerine in water. This makes 
the paper flabby and less able to resist the 
strain of the film. It is better to apply the 
glycerine solution to the surface of the 
picture. Draw a layer of absorbent cotton 
over the edge of a piece of glass. An old 
4x5 negative will do. Then, over the 
outside of this stretch a piece of muslin 
and slip a rubber band. The strength of 
the glycerine solution depends on the na- 
ture of the print, or rather the thickness 
of the gelatine coating; but it is safe to 
begin with one part of glycerine to 3 or 4 
parts of water. This is about a medium 
strength. A few trials will show the 
strength best suited to the paper. If, after 
thorough drying, the prints appear moist 
to the touch, less glycerine can be used. 
When, on the other hand, they still show a 
tendency to curl, use a stronger solution. 
Of course, only gelatine papers are suitable 
for this treatment. The prints must be dry 
when treated, and the glycerine solution 
can conveniently be kept in a small tray. 

Those who use amber chimneys, with 
Welsbach burners, in the dark room are 
undoubtedly familiar with the tendency 
these chimneys have to break when they 
are expected to do service. Their diameter 
is too small, they are too short, and the least 
flaw in the mantel will cause them to 
break. For all around usefulness an orange 
or ruby-colored wine bottle, cut off at the 
top and bottom, is much to be preferred. 
It excels in color, diameter, he : ght, dura- 
bility, and price. The cutting is simple. 
Wind a cotton string 3 or 4 times around 
the part to be cut, and tie it. Saturate 
the string with either alcohol or kerosene 
and ignite, turning the bottle slowly till 
the flame has become extinguished from 
exhaustion. Dip the bottle perpendicularly 
into a pail of cold water. The instant the 
water reaches the string the bottle will fly 



AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY. 



161 



apart. After having cut off the top and 
bottom, smooth the edges with a file and 
the chimney is finished. For dry plates, 
this is still too strong a light, and must be 
surmounted by a larger box, the openings 
of which are covered with ruby glass or 
fabric. A similar way of cutting bottles is 
by means of a pointed flame produced by 
a blow-pipe. A small spot is heated and a 
drop of water will start a crack. The 
flame is then applied a little in advance of 
it, and the crack will slowly follow the 
flame. By this method many elaborate de- 
signs can be produced. — Geo. S. Becker, in 
Western Camera Notes. 



THE COON WAS NOT HARNESSED. 

Oxford, Md. 
Editor Recreation : 

Mr. Homer G. Gosney, in May Recrea- 
tion, complains because his woodcock pic- 
ture did not receive higher consideration 
by the judges in your late photo contest, 
and seems to blame you. He disclaims 
any desire for a higher prize, yet seems 
dissatisfied because he did not get one. I 
am glad to have friend Gosney give an 
honest opinion of my efforts at amateur 
photography, but when his observations 
are false as to matters of fact, I request 
a small space to refute these reflections, 
as many of my friends are regular readers 
of Recreation. 

In criticising the picture "Besieged," Mr. 
Gosney calls attention to a "string, or 
rope," which, he claims is tied to the coon's 
collar. That is not true. No string or 
rope hampered the movements of this un- 
fortunate raccoon. He was caught with 
coon dogs, the same as any other coon, 
and as shown in the picture, along a shore 
familiar, no doubt, to all his ancestors. If 
the water was not sufficiently "choppy" to 
meet Mr. Gosney's ideas, it was the fault 
of the wind and not of the camera. 

I send you by express the negative from 
which the picture "Besieged" was made, 
that you may pass your own judgment as 
to whether the coon was tied and the string 
held by a man on the bank, and whether 
the water effect is not fully shown in the 
development of the plate. 

The scratch on one end of the negative 
was made after exposure and before de- 
velopment, in an effort to get the plate out 
of the plate holder with the point of a 
small knife blade. The plate simply stuck 
in the holder and was scratched in the 
effort to pry it out. 

J. E. Tylor. 

I have examined the negative carefully, 
under a powerful glass, and emphatically 
endorse all Mr. Tylor says of it. There is 
no evidence in it of any string having been 



used. There is a scratch in the film which 
was no doubt made with a knife as stated. — 
Editor. 

Mr. Gosney asked your readers to judge 
the 3 pictures. He did not give justice to 
the picture entitled "Besieged." If the 
coon had been held by a rope would the 
cord stand out straight or would it be 
slack? This scratch on the photo, for that, 
is what it appears to be, is out straight. 

Did you ever approach the nest of a. 
woodcock and see it slanting the way Mr. 
Gosney's picture shows it? His picture 
looks as if he were right up on the bird. 
Would that bird stay there while Mr. Gos- 
ney got his camera in order? The birds, 
are sensitive about being approached. 

F. A. Greenhawk, Easton, Md. 



SILHOUETTES BY PHOTOGRAPHY. 

There is a considerable advantage to 
be derived from studying silhouettes which 
is hard to find in the detailed picture. 
If one really wishes to impress the mem- 
ory of a friend's face indelibly on the 
mind a study of the silhouette is a neces- 
sary preliminary. There we find certain 
characteristics all separated from the con- 
fusing details and in the outlines of several 
silhouette poses we secure truths that are 
worth study. 

If only desired for the mere fun of the 
thing photographic silhouettes are cer- 
tainly worth anyone's while and will be 
found easy to make and entertaining. 
I have an album of these pictures on a 
table in the reception room and can always 
depend on it to while away a little time 
in entertaining a caller who may be ac- 
quainted with some of the originals of 
my silhouettes. Guessing who's who is no 
end of fun sometimes, though as a rule 
silhouettes are about as easy to recog- 
nize as the best likenesses. The only 
way they may be made doubtful enough 
to guess about is by using odd poses — 
not always a profile or profile groups. 

The best silhouette that can be made 
is made by photography. It is far in ad- 
vance of anything that can be cut out of 
black paper, I care not how deft the hand, 
for it is truer and has far more in it. At- 
tempt to cut out a figure from a print 
and then blacken it. The result will not 
have all those little touches that can not be 
done with scissors, and though good 
it will not compare with a photographic 
silhouette. 

I do not know that I follow the most 
approved means of obtaining my silhou- 
ettes, but it does nicely nevertheless and 
I will describe it. 

I simply pose my subject in the window, 
a sunny one, draw the white curtain, ex- 
pose a back plate i-io second and develop 
with a developer to which extra alkali 



l62 



RECREATION. 



has been liberally added. That brings up 
the high lights in a wink and leaves my 
subject clear glass. That is all there is to 
it except to print in Velox portrait, keep 
the whites clean and get a deep black 
tone. 

Estelle G. Melrose, in The Photo- Ameri- 
can. 

A BUDGET OF QUERIES. 

Please give formula for toning bath for 
P. O. P. paper, which does not require 
preliminary washing before toning in gold 
bath, one by which brown to blue-black 
tones can be secured. 

How can chemical or light fog be re- 
moved from plates? 

Give formula for intensifier, which will 
intensify shadows, etc., before the high 
lights. 

Please give formula for a good local in- 
tensifier. 

Can a rapid rectilinear lens be used as 
a fixed focus lens, either with double com- 
bination, or single lens, at different dis- 
tances. 

What camera and lens do you regard as 
the best? 

Are gelatine prints, toned in single baths, 
permanent? 

Are developing papers, toned in single 
baths, permanent? 

J. R. Hoffman, Johnstown, Pa. 

ANSWER. 

A formula for gold toning after fix- 
ing, appeared several months ago in Rec- 
reation in an article on that subject by 
E. W. Newcomb. There is none that re- 
quires no preliminary washing and gives 
good results. 

If but trifling, rub with chamois pad, 
wet with alcohol. If strong, use Farmer's 
reducer. 

None is known. 

Dab blue water color paint on the back 
of the negative, where you want local in- 
tensifier. Pat it gently with forefinger to 
get it even. 

Yes, if you set it for a certain distance, 
and then make sure to use it for that dis- 
tance only. 

The only means of deciding which cam- 
era is best, is to study the catalogues care- 
fully and see which has the most features 
you require. All are the best. 

Gelatine prints properly toned and well 
washed are permanent, whether single or 
double bath is used. 

Developing papers are also permanent 
if properly fixed and washed. — Editor. 

SNAP SHOTS. 
I often have Velox print out unevenly 
with negatives that make good solio prints. 
What would be a cause? 



How is a positive obtained from a posi- 
tive, as a picture printed in a magazine 
when the printers have only a picture to 
work from? 

Are isochromatic and non-halation plates 
more difficult to develop than the ordinary 
extra rapid plate? 

Is there any better developer for East- 
man plates that that put up by the Eastman 
Company ? 

Will printing Velox for 4 or 5 minutes 
help the prints when they develop too slow- 
ly with 3 minutes exposure? 

G. V. Mc, Towanda, Pa. 

ANSWER. 

Perhaps you over expose them and the 
prints jump up too quickly. Try shorter, 
exposure and longer development. 

By photographing the picture on a 
copper plate and then etching; in other 
words, photo engraving. It is a process 
far beyond the amateur and of no use to 
anyone but those who use it commercially. 

Iso plates are extremely sensitive to red 
light. They must practically be put in 
the holders in the dark and covered after- 
ward, while being developed. Backed 
plates are no more difficult to handle than 
unbacked, providing you use E. W. N. 
backing, advertised in this magazine. 

No. 

Of course. Cut one 4x5 slip into 4 
pieces, expose each a different time on 
same negative, develop all at once, and you 
will learn much. — Editor. 



Please tell me what pyro powders, ready 
mixed, you prefer; also, what plates you 
recommend, speed considered. 

As per March Recreation, kindly give 
me formula for toning Velox to a number 
of colors. 

S. A. Coupal, Lebret, Assa. 

ANSWER. 

Eastman's pyro powders, in glass tubes 
and Carbutt's, New York, are among the 
best plates. 

For toning Velox to colors read reply 
to inquiry of Mr. Wm. T. Perry, in this 
issue of Recreation, page 157 — Editor. 



I have some film negatives that I pinned 
up to dry on a hardwood table leaf, and 
they took the impression of the grain in 
the wood to such an extent as to show 
the grain in the print, thereby spoiling 
them for good clear photos. What can I 
do to remove this impression from the 
negatives ? 

P. S. Marsten, Medustic, N. B. 

ANSWER. 

Rub vigorously with alcohol. — Editor 



RECREATION. 163 



IF IT ISJV'T AJV EASTMAJV. IT ISM' T A KODAK 



A New Folding 




^6= 



00 



KODAK 



for the pocket — almost for the vest pocket, at six dollars. Makes 
pictures i$£ x 2}4 inches, loads in daylight, has a fine meniscus lens, 
brilliant finder, automatic shutter — in fact, has the " Kodak quality " 
all the way through. 

No. Folding Pocket Kodak, for pictures 1% x 2)^ inches, . $6.00 
Transparent Film Cartridge, 12 exposures, 1^x2^, . . .25 

Do. , 6 exposures, . . . . . . .15 



EASTMAJf KJDT)AK COMTAfiy 

Catalogue free at the dealer's or by mail. 

£4,000.00 in Prizes for Kodak, and "Brotunie Ticturej. 



164 



RECREATION. 




" A Perfect Picture* ' 

IF I t' S MADE WITH A 

Century 
Cacirversc 



' I *HE 15 years experience in the scientific con- 
struction of Cameras, which are back 
of CENTURYS mean everything to the 
purchaser. More real merit — more new features 
and a higher standard of quality than any 
others without exception. 10 different models, 
$9.00 to $90.00. SPECIAL CAMERAS FOR 
SPORTSMEN. Our new catalogue contains 
information of value to every photographer. 
Mailed free upon request. 



Made with a Century Grand. By Fred L. Wallace, Fhila. 



Century Camera Co. 

Rochester, New York 

Mention Recreation. 



: 






There is little attention paid here to 
the game law. Pot hunters scour the coun- 
try and shoot everything they can hit in 
the shape of game and song birds. Then, 
when snow comes, they take their ferrets 
and bags and get every rabbit that leaves 
a track, in order to sell them for 5 cents 
each. Thus they make good wages for a 
week or so, and when a sportsman goes out 
with dog and gun he is lucky if he can 
start 2 or 3 rabbits. There ought to be a 
law to prohibit the use of ferrets. I ob- 
tained over 100 signatures to a petition 
for such a law and sent it to our represen- 
tative. He promised to put it through, 
but never did anything in the matter. I 
am going to try it again with our new 
representative next fall, and I want the 
help of the L. A. S. I hope to have 500 
names on the next petition and shall not 
rest until I get them. I also hope the L. 
A. S. will present a bill to prohibit the 
sale of rabbits for at least 5 years ; also 
to prohibit the sale of fish taken from 
small inland lakes and streams. When 
spring opens there will, as usual, be a lot 
of hogs violating the law, and if I catch 
one you will hear from me. 

Drooks, Hillsdale, Mich. 



Should like to hear more through Recre- 
ation about the Sidle rifle telescope. 

L. Bailey, Lead City, S. D. 



Your gun and ammunition department is 
especially interesting. Please put in more 
articles about the world-famed 44 calibre. 
To my mind the 44 as a short range big 
game gun is without a rival, being short, 
light, accurate and powerful. As 90 per 
cent of big game killed is at short range, I 
do not see the need of the 30. The use 
of the 30 on game ought to be forbidden 
by law. Many deer are wounded by it, 
only to perish beyond reach of the hunter. 
Possibly there is a legitimate use for the 
weapon in the Far West, but the only way 
to save the deer in Minnesota, Wisconsin 
and Michigan is to bar the long range, 
game-wounding, 30 caliber rifle. 

W. Mashek, Kewaunee, Wis. 



White tail deer are still abundant at the 
head of Flatwillow creek. So. also, are 
antelope. Between the creek and Lake 
Mason I saw one bunch of 37 and another 
of over 60. Indians hunting wolf pups last 
spring slaughtered many antelope. Farther 
down, on t 1 3 Musselshell, antelope are rare, 
but there are plenty of deer and a few 
mountain sheep. Sage hens and prairie 
chickens are more than plentiful. The set- 
tlers here, with few exceptions, observe the 
law. Newcomers on the Musselshell are 1 
of a different class. They are butchering 
game without mercy. 

Petaluma, Flatwillow, Mont 



RECREATION. 



xvii 



^ ^ >•'- 



'</ 



■v#mr** m ' " 






""' ,. 











v 



\ 




All the conditions of photography lend themselves to the making of perfect 
pictures with Premo Cameras. The most difficult subjects are within the 
range of Premo achievement. They are all-round, ever ready, adaptable 
instruments for indoor or outdoor work, and they give equally satisfactory 
results in recording athletic events, taking group portraits, or studies of 
scenery and still life 

Premo Cameras 

ascend in price from $11.00 to $250.00 according to size and equipment. 
A thoroughly satisfactory camera for universal use is the Pony Premo No. 4, 
illustrated above. Adapted to use either plates or films. Price $20.00. 

Ask your dealer to show you the Premo series, or write for the new Premo Book. Free. 
Dept. F. ROCHESTER OPTICAL CO., Rochester, N. Y. 



XV1U 



RECREATION, 





ANSCHUTZ 

CAMERA 

NEEDS LESS LIGHT THAN ANY OTHER 



"IIHLL make pictures when others fail, and 
" will take anything others can* Most 
compact, Kghtest and most complete* A wonder- 
ful instrument for obtaining full-timed results 
when, J speed is essential Fitted with the famous 

Goerz Lens and Focal Plane Shutter 



Catalogue free from, your 
dealer or 



G. P. Goerz Optical 
Works ggg 

Room27,52 E. Union Sq., New York 

MAIN OFFICE: 

Berlin, Friedenau, Germany 



■>fz> 




It is all in the Lens 



Any old box will answer the purpose if it 
does not leak light; but you must have a 
fine lens to make a fine picture. 

You can get 

A Royal Anastigmat 
Lens, 4x5, Series No. 1 

Made by the Rochester Lens Co., Rochester, 
New York, 

And listed at $45, 

For 40 yearly subscrip= 

tions to RECREATION 

You can get any other lens made by this 
Company on the basis of one subscription 
lo each dollar of the list price of the lens. 

S imple copies of Recreation for use in 
soliciting furnished on application. 



I recently made a test in this city of the 
new patent lubricated wire patched bullets 
made by the National Projectile Works, 
of Grand Rapids, Mich. The device is a 
great improvement over the dry metal cased 
bullets now in general use, and I am 
pleased to recommend the new ammuni- 
tion to my friends and the trade. It will 
do all the manufacturers claim for it. 
There is a constantly increasing demand for 
a small bore, soft nosed bullet that will not 
wear or lead the gun, and I believe this 
bullet will fill every requirement. I found 
no difficulty in perforating a Y\ inch iron 
plate with the 30 caliber soft nosed, wire 
patched bullets, and in many cases could 
shoot a y 2 inch hole through 2 thicknesses 
of % inch iron, with the 303-180 Savage. 
John Popp, Saginaw, Mich., 



Recreation is all right. Roast the game 
hogs. They need it. I use a Winchester 
repeating shotgun and am no game hog 
either. It is the best trap gun I ever used. 
I broke 23 out of 25 clay targets the first 
time I ever shot at the trap. The largest 
number of quails I ever killed in one day 
was 9, not because I could not kill more 
but because I would not. 

M. C. McGowan, Lawrence, Mich. 



IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO 
NATURE, READ RECREATION. 



RECREATION. 



PANORAMIC 

P.AMFRA 




^!"-V i %; 






,.,j . v .M, . -| 


jjfryWf-^ 


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Easy 
-to use! 
Easy t 

to buy! 




PERFECTION IN PHOTOGRAPHY 

Has been secured by the use of the Al- Vista Camera. 
It produces the entire panoramic view — from the 
limit of vision on the left to the extreme point on the 
right. The Al- Vista Camera is compact : easy to 
use, sure in action. It is sold on its merits: we dem- 
onstrate this by selling you one ON EASY PAYMENTS. 
Ask us for a catalog : select the camera you wish, fill up the 
blank we shall send you, and references being satisfactory we 
will at once send you a camera — pay weekly or monthly in 
sums to suit your purse. The camera is no longer a luxury: 
the demands of modern progress make a good camera a 
necessity ; we make it easy for you to get the best. 

THE MULTISCOPE & FILM CO. 

136 Jefferson Street, Burlington. Wis. 



XX 



RECREATION. 



No. 3 FOLDING 
WENO HAWK-EYE, 




A DAYLIGHT LOADING FILM 
CAMERA OF THE, HIGHEST 
TYPE, IN POCKET FORM. 

Rapid Rectilinear lens, pneumatic release auto- 
matic shutter, with iris diaphragm stops, brilliant 
reversible finder, focusing scale, and tripod 
sockets for both vertical and horizontal pictures. 
May be fitted with a glass plate attachment at 
slight extra cost. 



&he Perfect Pocket Camera 

No. 3 Folding Weno HawK=Eye, with double R. R. lens, not loaded, $15.00 
Do., with single fixed focus achromatic lens, .... 13.50 



Hawk-Eye Catalog at 
your dealers or by mail. 



BLAIR CAMERA COMPANY, 

Rochester, N. Y. 



SPECIAI FREE OFFER 12= 

To any person sending me $i.oo for one year's sub- 
scription to Recreation I will give tree a choice of 
the following : 50 fine Bristol Cards printed to copy in 
Gold Ink ; or 50 Envelopes printed with return card 
and a cut representing an angler. With the words "If 
not caught in 10 Days return to;" or 50 Noteheads 
neatly printed. Write plainly to avoid mistake in 
printing. Samples of printing for stamp. Or I will 
give free a Bottle of Silver Plating Fluid for plating 
all kinds of metal surfaces ; or a Bottle of White Rose 
Cream for the complexion. Either new or old sub- 
scribers may take hold of this offer. Send money by 
registered letter. Address 
HtNRY NELSON, ECKVOLL, M I \ N . 

FREE-HOW DOES THIS STRIKE YOU ? 

To everyone sending me $1 by Draft or P.O. Money Or- 
der, for a year's subscription to Recreation, I will give the 
choice of one o f FOUR Roosevelt hunting books, Sagamore 
Series, post-paid, each containing frontispiece, 16° cloth, 
substantial and large print. The books are: '" Hunting the 
Grizzly," "Hunting Trips of a Ranchman," 'Wilderness 
Hunter" and " Hunting Trips on the Prairie." This is a 
generous offer and will not be open long. By this offer you 
can enlarge your library of sporting books with practically 
no expense to you. The books are interesting, instiuctive, 
considered by many President Roosevelt's best books. 
Addrass GEO. J. BICKNELL, Humboldt, Iowa. 



I will pay cash or give liberal exchange 
for interesting unmounted photographs, 
any size, either amateur or professional. 
Wilfred S. Tilton, Prairie Depot, Ohio. 



High power, lone range rifles are all 
right in the wilderness, but should not be 
used in settled country. For deer and black 
bear the 38-40 and the 40-40 are powerful 
enough. They can be depended on up to 
300 yards. The 38-55 Winchester is a 
good deer gun. Another excellent big: game 
gun is the Winchester light weight, 45-70- 
330 express. For small game the 22 long 
rifle and 25 rim fire are effective. 

For a combination target and small game 
rifle there is nothing better than the Rem- 
ineton 25-21. With that, an Ideal No. 3 
special loader. Perfection mould, and Uni- 
versal powder measure, one can experi- 
ment to his heart's content. 

For target shooting at 200 yards I recom- 
mend 21 grains, bulk, King's semi-smoke- 
less ; 86 grain bullet. For birds : 15 grains, 
bulk, semi-smokeless ; 77 grain bullet. For 
woodchucks, foxes, coons, etc. : 21 grains, 
bulk, semi-smokeless ; 75 grain express bul- 
let. 

H. C. Green, Waterman, 111. 



50c. pe r 1000 

With a WAGER SCALE you can make 1000 perfect negatives, and you can't do it otherwise. 
Post free, 50 cents. Aluminum, $1.00. Endorsed by the Editor of Recreation. Your 
money back if you don't like it. Send a postal for descriptive circular. 

WAGER EXPOSURE SCALE CO., Box 539, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



kECREATION. 



Photographic Talks. No. 2. 



Outdoor Work 



The increasing need for one dry plate of general util- 
ity, such as photographic science has perfected in R. O. 
C. The Rochester Dry Plate is becoming more and 
more appreciated every day. In this new plate is repre- 
sented a unity of orthochromatic and non-halation quali- 
ties. Possessing, as it does, sufficient speed for every 
purpose combined with the power to render the sharpest 
definition, the adaptability of R. O. C. The Rochester 
Dry Plate to every sort of work, is at once understood. 

In no branch of photography does the value of 
the general plate become so apparent as in the study of 
nature. The varying colors, the swaying foliage, the 
brilliant lights and heavy shadows all demand a plate 
of unlimited latitude and efficiency. 

For outdoor work the value of R. O. C. The 
Rochester Dry Plate will be at once appreciated by 
the professional, who understands the value of color ; 
the quality of light and the degrees of speed; by the 
amateur, who desires a result of uniform excellence, 
whether the subject is the sunlit bower of roses, or the 
rock-shadowed glen; finally by every photographer 
who wishes to profit by the most important advance 
of the art. Ask your dealer about 



r THE 
ROCHESTER 



ROC 

^ DRY PLATE j£ 



ROCHESTER OPTICAL & CXMERX CO., Rochester, flf.y. 

Largest Tlate Camera makers in the Ivorld. 



xxu 



RECREATION. 



Royal in Name Royal in Quality 



■ARE" 



ROYAL ANASTIGMAT LENSES 



For 

Landscapes 

Ocean Views 

Mountain 

Scenery 

Architecture 

Interiors 

and 

Portraits 

USE 

A 

ROYAL 




Reduced from 5x7 Print made with a Series II 



Catalogue Upon Request if You Mention Recreation 

ROCHESTER LENS CCX t Rochester, N. Y„ U. & A. 



There are Many AN ASTIGM ATS Dvt 0nl y 0ne 




A Convertible Lens 

Some Anastigmats 
are better than others 
but noneis betterthan 
the VER ASTIGM AT 

We don't ask you to 
believe it because we 
say so, but we would 
thank you to test the 




A Wide Angle Lens 

VERASTIGMAT 

side by side with all 
others before you buy 
Send for our book- 
let; it is instructive 
and interesting, and 
to be had for the ask- 
ing. Mention Recreation 



piannailan Optical Co. of N. Y., W - - CressRiil, l J. 






RECREATTUN. 



xxm 



j&PAY YOUR VACATION EXPEWSES& 

$ 3 ,000 for Photographs 

The past* quarter century has seen the greatest* advancement, in photography; it> has also 
included the development* of our photographic lenses and shutters until now their number 
runs into the millions, used in every land and clime. In order to bring together a representa- 
tive collection of work from this vast array of photographers we have instituted a compe- 
tition including every class of photography and from the simplest lens on the cheapest camera 
to the most expensive anastigmat. 

Bausch <Sb Lomb Optical Co.'s 
LENSES or SHUTTERS 

must* have been used to make the pictures. That* is the only condition. The exhibits will 
be judged in classes such as Landscape, Portrait*, Genre, Instantaneous, Hand Camera large 
and small, etc., and everyone can have an opportunity to compete. It costs nothing to enter : 
and the most* competent* and impartial judges will make the awards. If you are buying an 
outfit* see that* the lens and shutter are Bausch <§*» Lomb's make. 

Special Booklet* tells about* the Classes and Conditions 

i 

Bausch ®> Lomb Optical Co; 

Incorporated 1866 

NEW YORK ROCHESTER, N. Y. CHICAGO 



A NEW BULLET FASTENER. 

I suppose all of us have had more or 
less trouble in reloading smokeless rifle 
shells. Being the owner of a Savage rifle, 
I naturally supplied myself with the neces- 
sary reloading tools, resizers, etc., that I 
might not be cornered in the wilderness by 
lack of ammunition. However, there was 
always a large percentage of shells that 
would not crimp properly, so as to hold 
the bullet tight. I told the Ideal Co. about 
it, and they advised me to use their newly 
devised prick-punch. It seemed this should 
fill the bill, but it was rather clumsy and 
heavy. I wanted light weight indentation 
forceps, which I could use for cartridges 
of all calibers, without being compelled to 
use cap extractors, shell holders, etc. 

Recently I received a pair of forceps, 
through the courtesy of an old sportsman, 
which I deem of sufficient value to describe 
for the shooting fraternity. These forceps 
are neat looking, simple and efficient, and 
they fasten bullets perfectly without mar- 
ring the shell. They are patented and sold 
by A. Kind, Hunstig (Rheinl.), Germany. 
The little instrument can be carried in the 
vest pocket. One of its jaws has a rounded 
elongation, which is used for smoothing 
any indentation before reloading. The tool 
also does away with resizing: the mouth of 
the shell, to the saving of time and temper. 
It can be used for all calibers. 

Dr. C. E., Crescent, la. 



THREE SHOTS AT THE DEVIL. 

April io, 1899, Charles Hank and I were 
camping on the banks of Silver lake, S' 
D., determined to bag a few geese and 
ducks during the Northern flight. We had 
not the best luck, but got a few geese and 
our fair share of ducks, besides a few other 
specimens of water fowl. One day Hank 
went out in the boat looking for some- 
thing to shoot at while Charles and I played 
cards in the tent. We heard Hank's rifle 
several times. Soon he came running in, 
wet from head to foot. He explained that 
while standing in the boat, aiming at a dis- 
tant duck, the boat drifted against a large 
block of ice and overturned. When he 
took off his wet clothes he spread his un- 
dershirt out on the tent roof just above 
the 3-foot wall of the tent. This was done 
after dark. About 12 o'clock that night 
the moon came out and shone brightly. 
Charles awoke and 3 feet above his head 
was the shape of a human figure, leaning 
over and looking at us. His wild exclama- 
tion awoke us. Each man reached for a 
loaded shotgun and fired madly at the 
apparition. As it did not disappear we 
investigated and found that Hank's under- 
shirt was badly damaged. 

C. C. Bierly, Conyngham, Pa. 



And lest you forget, in a fit of aberration, 
I say it again: Please mention Recreation, 



XXIV 



RECREATION. 



Goerz Xrieder Binocvilacrs 




An article that ap" 
peals to almost every 
reader of 'Recreation. 
Take one -with you, 
no matter where you 
go— on la.nd or sea., 
in forest or mountains. 

Compact. Durable. 

Light in weight, finely 
finished, of unique de- 
sign with great magni- 
fication ^ower, they 
are unequalled. 



Field of Vietv 11 per cent, greater than any other 

Catalogue free from yoxir deader or 

C. P. GOER.Z OPTICAL WORKS 

Room 27, 52 E. UNION SQ., NEW YORK 



Main Office: 

Berlin, Friedenau, Germany. 



Are You an. Amateur 
PKotogratpKer ? 




If so, would you like a Camera that will photograph 

A whole range of mountains 
A whole sweep of river 
A whole army 

'A whole fleet of ships 
A whole city 

Or any other vast stretch of scenery or moving- 
objects? THE SWING LENS DOES IT. 

75he AL VISTA 

Is the thing. It lists at $30. 
One of the greatest inventions of the age. 
Given as a premium for 20 Stibscriptions. 

For particulais address 

RECREATION, aElBfi oS 



To any person sending me a subscription 
to Recreation, accompanied by $1, I will 
send one copy of the "Song of Songs," a 
drama in 5 acts, based on the Song of Solo- 
mon. This is an interesting, instructive 
and elevating play, written by my late hus- 
band, the Rev. Morse Rowell, Jr. The 
book is bound in paper and is alone worth 
$1. In addition I have arranged with the 
editor of Recreation to send the magazine 
to all subscribers who may send me their 
subscription on this plan. 

Mrs. Belle J. E. Rowell, 

Miller Place, L. I. 



The results from my small ad in Recre- 
ation far exceeded my expectations. I 
have disposed of all the articles therein 
mentioned, having received inquiries from 
almost every State in the Union. 

Recreation has a far greater circulation 
and covers a wider territory than I sup- 
posed possible for a sportsmen's periodical. 
I hope it may attain greater results in the 
future. If anybody has anything to sell 
I advise him to advertise it in Recrea- 



tion. 



H. C. Dieckhoff, Decatur, 111. 



The more I read Recreation, the moer 
I wonder what rifle a man should select fo 
big game. I still have great faith in the 
old reliable 45-70. Long life and prosper- 
ity to Recreation. 

R. E. Peater, Mansfield, 0, 



RECREATION. 



XXV 



MILLEN'S 

French Satin Jr. 



T 



HE STANDARD blue print 
paper of the world — not the 
ordinary kind, but a perfect paper 
for photographic work, perfectly 
made and perfectly packed in 
sealed tubes. The delight of pro- 
fessional and amateur 



Photographers 



There is no better, it is the best. 
A postal card will bring full infor- 
mation of French Satin Jr. and our 
other photographic specialties. 

THE J. C. MILLEN, M. D. 

Photographic Chemical Co. 

DENVER, COLORADO 



DOT GLERK'S RACKET. 

Youst ledt me toldt you apout ein feller 
vot shood sometings alretty. Vat his name 
is I don't toldt you ; but he glerks pye dot 
Racket store in Mechanicsburg. Mebby 
dot is vere dey soldt dose rackets vor der 
ping pongs, eh? 

He vas tellin' der poys dot ven he vas 
shoodin' oudt in der gountry he dake no 
dog mit him und only 128 shells. Und 
ven he bye dot vorest arrifed he saw 3 
shicken hawks. He shood mit his gun 2 
of dose pirds und der oder vly avay. Dot 
was a smardt pird vat gedt avay from dot 
man. Ven dot glerk vollow dot pird he 
shoo up von guail und shoods him. Und 
he geep on und von at a dime he shoo up 
125 guails und shood 124. Dot last pird he 
nicht could vind. Dot vas goot shoodin', 
ain't id? 

Und dot feller go on und vind von bulls- 
nake und pound him mit a glub to bieces 
und vind in him von rabbit, von ham 
pone und 8 bartridge eggs. How could dot 
glerk dose eggs gount if he pound dem 
to pieces alretty? Is dot man a kame hog 
or a liar verdomd? 

Dose poys vat inhale dot glerk's hodt air 
read Regreation und vould like to see dot 
man beshamed gedt. 

Gotleib Varsaw, Woomleysburg, Pa. 

IN ANSWERING ADS PLEASE MEN- 
TION RECREATION, 



/ /_ ^ 




Tfie Paper for Printing by Gaslight 



If your dealer cannot supply you send 20 « for one 
dozen 4X5 size with developer. 

THE ANTHONV&SCOVILL CO. 

fz2-l24FIfth Avenue mh-ateih Sts AtlasB!ock,RandolphSt®wabasbAw 
NEW YORK CHICAGO 



E^i 



NEW TEMPLE ATTACHMENT 

Don't lose your Eyeglasses. 
Don't drop them, even for a moment, 
Use the New Temple Attachment. 

The change is made, not by an experienced op- 
tician, but by anyone wearing eyeglasses, with 
the aid of Gall & Lembke's .New Temple Attach- 
ment. 




Neact 

Convenient 



Simple 
Ha.ndy 

Every wearer of eyeglasses wishes occasionally 
that his pince-nez were spectacles. They stay 
on, however violent one's exercise; however 
warm the weather. 

With this New Device you carry practically 
both eyeglasses and spectacles in one ordinary 
case. 

Automobile and horseback riding, hunting, 
fishing, ping pong, cycling, yachting, golf, tennis, 
and all other athletic exercises can be indulged 
in with perfect safety to your glasses. 
Price in nickel ... - 50 cents 
Price, gold plated - - - - 75 cents 

Send for circular. 

GALL & LEHBKE 



21 Union Square 

Mention Recreation. 



NEW YORK 



XXVI 



RECREATION. 



Velox 

will give you 
the most sat= 
isfactory re= 
suits from 
your vaca= 
tion nega- 
tives. 

Softness and 
richness with pure 
blacks and mellow 
high lights are 
Velox character" 
istics. 

It prints by any 
light. No dark room 
required. 

Nefera Chemical Co. 

Division of the General Aristo Co. 

NEPERA PARK, N. Y. 
Velox is sold by all dealers* 



HOW THEY LIKE THE PREMIUMS. 

The Shakespeare reel you sent me as a 
premium received its initiation at Long 
Beach, Cal., March 1901. It was with me 
at Santa Catalina island; at Wisconsin 
lakes where bass abound; at numerous 
trout streams in Wisconsin and Northern 
Michigan. I can truthfully say it is the 
most satisfactory reel I ever used. 

T. W. Borum, Barron, Wis. 



I received the tent you sent me for 5 
subscriptions to Recreation, and wish to 
thank you for it. How can you give such 
a valuable premium for so small a number 
of subscriptions? Do you happen to have 
a garden patch where tents grow ready for 
the happy hunting ground? 

Claude Stringer, Columbiaville, Mich. 



Khotal stove received and gives entire 
satisfaction. It is the ideal stove for canoe- 
ing, camping and house-boating. After 
using it once you will never again smoke 
your coffeepot, get ashes in your food or 
cuss the smudge from a wood fire. 

L. Hurdley, Millville, N. J. 



Both my premiums have arrived. The 
revolver is all right. But the prize which 
I am most pleased with is the 30-30 rifle. 
Accept my most sincere thanks for reward- 
ing me so liberally for the little work I did 
for you. 

W. H. Tower, Monroe, Mass. 



Many thanks for the Davenport gun 
which arrived safe. I have no doubt it 
will shoot as well as it looks. The valu- 
able premiums you give are in keeping 
with the magazine you publish. 

G. W. W. Bartlett, Haverhill, Mass. 



The Syracuse hammerless sent me as a 
premium came O. K. Have given it a good 
trial, and find it perfectly satisfactory. 
Please accept my sincere thanks for your 
prompt way of doing business. 

John Uhl, Johnstown, Pa. 



I received the 3 Laughlin fountain pens 
and they are fine. Please accept my 
thanks. I have given them a thorough 
test and they work to perfection. 

A. G. Kellenberger, Tacoma, Wash. 



I received the Ingersoll watch you sent 
me as a premium and found it much better 
than I expected. I thank you for your 
kindness 

R. L. Distler, Elmwood PI., O. 



The Winchester rifle you sent me as 
premium for subscribers to Recreation is 
a beauty. Many thanks to you for it 

Geo. B. Mitchell, Gays Mills, Wis. 



RECREATION. 



XXVll 




IT'S ALL IN THE LENS 

Series V Long Focus Korona 

Can be used with equal facility for 
everyday, hand-camera 

Snap Shots 

Photographing Distant Views 

Copying 

or other work needing bellows ca- 
pacity, and also with wide-angle 
lenses for interiors and kindred 
subjects. 

ONE CAMERA DOES IT ALL 



Every adjustment is a marvel 
of simplicity and mechanical 
ingenuity, and many of them 
are found exclusively on the 
Korona. 

Note our patent auxiliary 
bed for use with wide-angle 
lenses, and compare it with 



the clumsy methods used to obtain this 
result on other cameras. 

Our patent automatic swing back op- 
erates from the center according to correct 
principles. 

KORONA LONG FOCUS 

Has a Convertible Lens, Automatic Shut- 
ter, and numerous other special advantages. 

Catalogue gives full information 

Gundlach Optical Co. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y. 





Mention Recreation 



XXV111 



RECREATION. 



THE WISDOM OF SIEUR LEMERY. 
From a book printed in 1711. 

To catch partridges steep wheat in Aqua 
Vitae, place it where the partridges repair, 
and they will fall down drunk. 

To make rabbits come out of their Berries 
without a ferrit: 

Take powder of orpiment, sulphur and 
an old shoe, or parchment, or cloth, which 
burn at the mouth of the berry, upon which 
the wind blows, and spread your bags un- 
der the wind. 

Another way : 

Put one or 2 cray fishes into the mouth 
of the berry, and they will certainly make 
the conies come out. 

To gather together a great number of 
hares : 

Take juice of henbane mixed with the 
blood of a young hare, and sew it in a 
hare's skin, which bury in the earth. 

An admirable way to prevent arms from 
rusting, and to take off the rust : 

Take a pound and a half of beef suet, a 
pound and a half of oil of sweet almonds, 
extracted without fire, one pound of 
fresh olive oil, 4 ounces of camphor, 12 
ounces of lead, burnt with sulphur, make 
a composition of them, and boil it to the 
substance of an ointment, with which rub 
the arms to prevent rusting. 

A Pleasant way to catch crows : 

You must mince some ox liver or lights 
with some Nux Vomica, which make up 
into little balls as big as small nuts and 
spread them in any field ; as soon as the 
crows eat them they fall down and you 
may easily catch them with your hands. 

To catch fish : 

Put oil of camomile into a vial, and 
when you would fish you must have some 
worms, and kill them in the said vial of 
o.l, and bait your hooks with those worms. 

A wonderful secret to bring the fish to 
the places you desire : 

Boil barley in water till it bursts, and 
boil it with licorice, a little mummy and 
honev, beat all together in a mortar till it 
is stiff as a paste, which put into boxes 
close stopped; when you would fish in any 
place take about the quantity of a walnut 
of it, and boil it in any earthen pot, with 
2 handfuls of fresh barley, with a little 
licorice, leaving it till it is almost dry; then 
tiirow it into the place whither you would 
have the fish come, and they will gather 
there. 

The above valuable information is found 
in a volume entitled; "New Curiosities in 
Art and Nature ; or a Collection of the 
Most Valuable Secrets in all Arts and 
Sciences." The faded brown fly leaf of 
this book states that the contents are 
"Copied and Experimented by the Sieur 
Lemery, Apothecary to the French King." 
It was printed in the year 171 1 and in his 
preface the English translator says: "It 
will be far from being a Burthen to the 
Reader to let him at once into the following 



secrets, many of which, I can assure him, 
if he maken a Right Choice of, have been 
lock'd up in the Closets of the Best Fami- 
lies of Europe, as Rarities too valuable to be 
exposed to the Publick." 

Le Roy Thomas, Washington, D. C. 



A TWO-SIDED STORY. 

Four of us were sitting around a fire- 
place watching the embers and swapping 
yarns when Browne joined the group. 

"Hello, boys.!" 

"Hello, Browne!" 

"Say, fellows, I have just returned from 
the greatest trip on record." 

"Tell us about it." 

"Well, Maitland and I went, as we told 
you, up in the Maine woods, and although 
we were disappointed in not getting any big 
game, we were more than repaid for our 
trouble. 

"There war ^n old farmer whom we se- 
cured as guide «iid he certainly knew the 
country. I never saw grouse so thick. I 
wish we could have stayed a month, but 3 
days was the limit. You ought to hear 
Maitland talk. Where is he? Oh, he 
had to go West on business just after 
we got back. But we certainly had great 
sport. He and I shot all the game. Jake, 
the guide, didn't own a gun, I guess. 
What did we get? Between us our bag 
amounted to 18 grouse, 22 quail and 17 
gray squirrels. We could have shot 4 
times as many, but we didn't want to act 
like hogs." 

"Did I ever tell you chaps about them 
2 city dudes thet come up here and wanted 
me to guide 'em raound?" said Jake to 
the loungers in the country store. "They 
were the all firedest rottenest shots I most 
ever see. They hed all the fancy, new- 
fangled idees in shootin' traps thet you 
ever thought of an' a durned sight more. 

"One of 'em, Maitland, did happen to 
hit a squirrel, but thet Browne, say, he 
had the purtiest gun you ever see, but. 
by grabs, he couldn't hev hit a flock of 
barns. I was a sellin' 'em pat'iges an' 
quails at $2.50 a dozen and gray squir'ls 
at 25 cents apiece, an', by gosh, they bought 
every last one, too." 

' S. L. J., New York City. 



We have many rabbits here, a few quails, 
some grouse, green wing teal, minks, 
woodchucks, squirrels, etc. I should like 
to hear about hunting quails. I like the 
way you roast the game hogs. 

Arnold N. Holmes, Greenland, N. H. 



Quails are abundant here and we have 
some ruffed grouse and prairie chickens. 
Grey and fox squirrels are numerous, with 
an occasional black. We have also wolves 
and red foxes. 

Z. A. Rickman, Knoxville, la. 



RECREATION. 



XXIX 



The Ideal Picnic. 

To thoroughly enjoy the day's outing, the luncheon should 
consist of substantial food, ready prepared, easy to carry, delicious 
to taste and easily digested, so as not to spoil the day's fun. 

The ideal food for picnickers is Grape-Nuts, which is 
thoroughly cooked at the factory and is always ready to serve with 
the addition of cream. 

A package of Grape- Nuts, a bottle of cream, some fruit, and 
you have a luncheon for home or abroad that is inexpensive, pleas- 
ing to the palate, and best of all, nourishing without causing in- 
ternal heat or the draggy feeling caused by heavy food. 

Grape-Nuts is the perfect food for hot weather, for in its pre- C> 
digested form it makes digestion easy, its crisp daintiness is charm- 
ing to all and the escape from the hot stove appeals to the house- 
wife. 

For camping, Grape- Nuts proves a most convenient food and 
a goodly supply should always be taken; it is used by some epicures 
in frying fish, for it adds a delightful flavor and is naturally supe- 
rior to the ordinary crumbed crackers or corn meal for this purpose. 

Many easy, hot weather recipes are found in each package for 
luncheon and supper desserts. 






/ 



XXX 



RECREATION. 



HAYDEN'S IflPROVED 

POCKET WATER FILTER 

A necessity for 

Sportsmen, Hunters, 
Wheelmen and Tourists! 




Filter and Mouth Piece made of fine, hard rubber. 

Two feet of rubber tube. 

Can be carried in the pocket or tool bag. 

Very light and neatly made. 

Will last many years. 

Filters through charcoal. 

After repeated experiments the little filter is as 
nearly perfect as it can be made. The barrel, or filter, 
is a trifle smaller than heretofore, and the water filters 
through charcoal. This is a decided improvement 
and absolutely filters. ^ 

Price, 75 cents, postpaid. 
CHAS. A. HAYI>EEf, 

OXFORD, OHIO. 



Bronze MedaJ, Pao-is Exposition, 1900 

Col Ian Waterproof 
Shoe Dressing 

Hunting Boots made permanently 
watertight, soft and flexible, never water- 
soaked, H€vrd a.nd shrunken. 

Dry feet for Sportsmen, Golf Players, 
Mountain Climbers, Explorers and others 
obliged to traverse wet and snowy fields 
or sta^nd e^bout in waiter. 

Great for a.11 -winter footwear and 
school shoes. Prevents cracking — shoes 
outwear others 3 or 4 times. 
A boon to ladies wearing thin-soled shoes. 
Fine for Saddles, Bridles, all Har- 
ness. An unequalled Gun Oil, prevents 
rust, cleans, wipes close. 

Sold in tins, Black 25c and 45c ; Yellow 
(for fair leather), 30c and '55c, f. o. b. N. Y. 
Gross lots and bulk prices special. Sold by 
dealers generally. Write us direct if your 
dealer doesn't keep it. 

J. R. B\ickelew,Sole A$l 

HI Chambers St.. N. Y. 

Mention Recreation. 



Healths Strength 

^beoDtaineaTrofessioivaLl New" 



PuiYchiivg 



Can. 
atta.ch.ed to 
a door, wall V 

or window casing. 

Noiseless a^ 
R&pid 



Weight 7£ lbs 

Punching BagGloves * 1 .25 

Price 

delivered <lt CZ. Q5 

complete -4P V-7. * 

Childrervs Size 

delivered <Jt :/f 

complete sP H 



. L). Crippen 

SaBroadway. New York. ^L^ 



How is your Muscle ? 



I 



Would you like to build it up ? 



Hoi are your Lungs ? 

Would you like to expand them? 

How is your Circulation ? 

Would you like to improve that? 

If so, send me 10 yearly subscriptions to Recre- 
ation, accompanied by a money order for $10, 
and I will send you a new 

Professional Punching Bag 

made by H. D. CRIPPEN, No. 52 Broadway, 
New York, and listed at $6.95. 



There is a frame with the bag that you can 
attach to a door casing, a window casing or a 
wall, or a board fence, or anywhere else you 
may see fit to put it, and you will thus have a 
small gymnasium of your own. The Crippen 
bag is one .of the liveliest ever devised, and if 
vou - : " isa day on it, for a month, 

Pftferful improvement in your 
mui i ' ^th. 

Sample cobea o A -recreation, for use in can- 
vassing, will be mailed frce.^, 



RECREATION. 



rCjoU 



Qvrt^ 



V 



^ 



A 



Watch 
Case 
Is Made 



The Jas. Boss Stiffenec 
jold Watch Case is mac 
I two layers of Solid Gold 
with a layer of Stiffening Metal be- 
tween welded and rolled together into one 
solid sheet of metal. The Jas. Boss Case is a Solid 
Gold Case for all practical purposes. The Stiffen- 
ing metal simply adds strength and durability. 
The Boss Case is guaranteed for 25 years by the 
largest watch case makers in the world, who have 
been making it for a full half century. Every Boss 
Case has the Keystone trade-mark stamped in- 
side. Ask any dealer to show you one. Write us 
for a booklet telling the whole story. 

The Keystone Watch Case Company, Philadelphia. 



By this mark w you know them 



x 



Should like to hear from someone who 
has used the 170 grain bullet, No. 308,206 
in Ideal Hand Book, in a .303 Savage. I 
find U. M. C. .303 Savage miniatures fit 
the chamber so loosely as to allow gas, 
particles of powder and even bits of brass 
from the shells to blow back into the eyes. 
I cannot understand why the 180 grain 
Savage bullet has a lower trajectory 
at 100 yards than the 30-40 Winchester, 
while at 200 yards its trajectory is higher 
than that of the 30 W. C. F. A penetra- 
tion of 50 boards is claimed for the .303 
Savage while the Winchester catalogue 
allows it only 7,3. Should like to hear from 
users of the Remington-Lee 30-40. 

R. C. Barton, Papillion, Neb. 



x^or general shooting would you recom- 
mend a cylinder or a full choke bore? 
What is a good load in a 16 gauge for rab- 
bits, and what for ducks? Are brass shells 
suitable for shot guns ? How can I resight 
a 4 caliber rifle? 

Eugene B. Strong, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Can a shot gun or a rifle barrel be re* 
bored without changing the gauge or cali- 
ber? Harold Sheldon, Fair Haven, Vt. 

ANSWER. 

Generally speaking, a shot gun or a rifle 
can not be rebored without changing the 
gauge or caliber. A gunmaker or gun- 
smith can run a boring or rifling instru- 
ment through your gun a few times to 
remove the leLa or rough spots, but it 
would not be well to continue the process 
enough to cut away any perceptible 
amount of metal. If this were done it 
would change the gauge or caliber. — Editor. 



Will some reader of Recreation who 
has used a 16-gauge shot gun for water 
fowl shooting tell me if the weapon is 
suitable for such work. Also what length 
of barrel is best. Have always used a 12- 
gauge gun, but think a 16 is large enough 
for a sportsman who is satisfied with a 
moderate bag. 

U. L. A., Provo, Utah. 



The 
Hawkeye 





keeps contents 
cool and sweet throughout the 
warmest Summer day. Light, 
compact and durable. Your 
money back if not pleased after 
ten days' trial. 

No. I, size 18x10x8 inches 
deep, , . price, $3.25 

No. 2, size 20xi3xio inches 
deep, . . price, $3.50 

* "V vour dealer for it, or 
n. subject to 

inc. to-day for 
.* . — l giving full description. 



IDEAL FOR ALL OUTINGS 

Lined with zinc, hair, felt and asbestos. Air- 
tight and dust-proof. A small quantity of ice 
deliriously 




BURLINGTON RASKFT WORKS, 



BURLINGTON. IOWA. 



XXX11 



RECREATION. 




Stallman's 
Dresser 



Have you seen one? It is 

up - to - date. Think of it, 

everything - within reach. No 

heavy trays, but light, smooth 

drawers. Holds as much and costs 

no more than a good box trunk. 

nr* | Hand riveted, almost indestructible. 

1*11 '* IK Once tried, always recommended. 

*****■■ g ent q q f) ^ privilege examination. 

2C. stamp for catalogue. Mention Recreation. 

F. A. STALLMAN, 

87 W. Spring St., Columbus, O. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

We will give the first per- 
son answering this advertise- 
ment from each town in the 
United States an unusual op- 
portunity to obtain 

The American 
$10 Typewriter 

OR 

The American 
$40 Typewriter 

For full particular?, 
address promptly 

THE AMERICAN TYPEWRITER CO., 260 Broadway, New York City. 

IN ANSWERING ADS PLEASE 
MENTION RECREATION. 




THE 

ADIRONDACK 

MOUNTAINS 



The lakes and streams in the Adi- 
rondack Mountains are full of fish; 
the woods are inviting, the air is filled 
with health, and the nights are cool 
and restful. If you visit this region 
once you will go there again. An 
answer to almost any question in re- 
gard to the Adirondacks will be found 
in No. 2oof the " Four-Track Series," 
" The Adirondacks and How to Reach 
Them ; " sent free on receipt of a 
2-cent stamp, by George H. Daniels, 
General Passenger Agent, New York 
Central & Hudson River Railroad, 
Grand Central Station, New York. 



I am just in receipt of the Marble hunt- 
ing knife as premium for getting subscrib- 
ers for Recreation. Can truly say it is the 
finest hunting knife I ever saw. 

I shall continue to get subscribers for 
Recreation as opportunity permits. It is 
a little late to do much now, but shall do 
my best at all times. 
D. T. Santo, Mayville, Ore. 

Free : I will print 50 visiting cards for 
any one who will send me a subscription to 
Recreation, accompanied by $1. Send 
stamp for sample card. D. J. Finn, 

West 184th St. & Broadway, New York 



O O 




•5 C v <u j2 
rt rt X. >- 1/5 

■=T r J2 a « 



This 
Parent 

recommends itself and reminds you that 
on receipt of your name and address we 
will mail you our 

Illustrated 
Ca.taJogue 

containing samples of 

Corduroy, Canv as, Mackintosh, 

Flannels, etc., 

also cuts, descriptions and blanks for 
measurement. Address 

H. J. Upthegrove & Son, 
No. 2 Wood St., VALPARAISO, IND. 



RECREATION. 



XXXlll 



POSTED PASTURES. 

I read with much interest the letter of 
Mr. De Loach in November Recreation. 
Although agreeing heartily with most of 
his views, I think he fails to realize how 
necessary it is for the preservation of game 
in Texas that the hands of the pasture 
owners should be strengthened. If they 
could not post their pastures they would 
be overrun with swarms of pot hunters, 
both from town and country, and what 
game is left now would soon be extermi- 
nated. The preservation of the 2 or 3 
small bands of antelope within 100 miles 
of here, which are all that remain of the 
thousands that used to cover this coun- 
try, is entirely due to the action of the 
men in whose pastures they run. 

The same is true, to a great extent, of 
deer, turkeys, quails, and all kinds of fish. 
Also, many hunting and fishing parties 
are careless about shutting gates, and 
properly extinguishing camp fires, before 
leaving; and I have heard of cases where 
valuable stock has been injured by reckless 
shooting. I fail to see how any law can 
be considered "one sided and class legis- 
lation," which only gives a man the right 
to keep intruders off his own property. 

No doubt Mr. De Loach feels sore at 
seeing strangers to the country slaughter 
game, while he is not allowed a shot at a 
deer, and I can sympathize with him ; but 
if these pastures were thrown open to all 
comers how long would there be any deer 
left? 

As a rule, I believe the pasture owners 
l e good sportsmen, are moderate in what 
they and their friends kill and are willing 
to give reasonable permission to local 
sportsmen, if thev believe it will not be 
abused. Of course there are some who 
take no interest in game preservation ; but 
nearly all who shoot or fish are anxious, 
if only from selfish motives, that sufficient 
breeding stock should be left. 

The laws we have now have been of 
great assistance in preserving the game, 
and are, I think, fairly well observed. A 
law entirely prohibiting the sale of game 
would be better, as it is not easy to prove 
that game was not shot in the county 
where it is offered for sale. Moreover, 
the wholesale shooting of wild fowl on 
the coast should be immediately stopped. 
L. A. S., No. 3875, Tecumseh, Texas. 

Wanted — To communicate with a few 
gentlemen who would like to join a country 
club, owning 1,000 acres of mountain forest, 
within 100 miles of New York; altitude 1,400 
feet; beautiful lake, covering 100 acres, well 
stocked with black bass ; fine chance for 
game preserve ; each member gets building 
lot fronting on lake; first class references 
given and required. Address S. G., care 
Recreation. 



1 

Not what is W 

said of it, W 

but what it does, W 

has made the 

fame of the 

Elgin 
Watch I 






and made 10,000,000 
Elgins necessary to 
the world's work. 
Sold by every jeweler 
in the land; guaran- 
teed by the greatest 
watch works. Illus- 
trated art booklet free. 

ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO. 
Elgin, Illinois. 



m 



BNNENB 



BORATED 
TALCUM 



■i^JS** 



PRICKLY HEAT, 
CHAFING, and 
SUNBURN, Sr T1 £ L s£E uc ' noNJ 

"A little higher in price, perhaps, than worthless substi- 
w stitates. but a reason for it." Removes all odor of perspi- 
ration. Delighiful afier Shaving. Sold everywhere, or mailed 
''on receipt of 25c. Get Mennen's (the original). Sample Free. 
GERHARD MENNEN CO., Newark, W. J. 



XXXIV 



RECREATION. 



SOME RARE OPPORTUNITIES 

These goods are all new, and will be shipped 
direct from factory. Prices named are those at 
which manufacturers and dealers usually sell. 
Here is a good chance to get 

A Book, a Gun, a Camera ) core t\r 

A Sleeping Bag, a Fishing Rod [ ™"i. Uh 
A Reel, a Tent, ) ou:> ' 

Subscriptions need not all be sent at once. They 
may be sent in installments as taken and credit will 
be given on account. When the required number 
is obtained the premium earned will be shipped. 

These Offers are subject to change 
without notice. 

TO ANY PERSON SENDING ME 

TWO yearly subscriptions to Recreation 
at $i each, I will send a copy of Hunt- 
ing in the Great West, cloth ; or a Zar 
Camera, listed at $i; or an Ingersoll Watch 
or Cyclometer, listed at $i; or a Recreation 
Waterproof Match Box, made by W. L. 
Marble and listed at $i; or a Shakespeare 
Revolution Bait listed at 75 cents; or a 
Laughlin Fountain Pen ; or a Cartridge Belt 
listed at $2 ; or a dozen Trout Flies, as- 
sorted, listed at $1 ; or a Stonebridge 
Folding Aluminum Lantern, listing at $1.50. 

THREE subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Battle of the Big Hole, cloth; or a 
safety pocket ax, made by W. L. Mar- 
ble and listed at $2.50; or a dozen Bass Flies, 
assorted, listed at $2 ; or 4 dozen Carbutt 
plates, 4x5 or 5x7. 

FOUR subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
Camping and Camp Outfits, cloth ; or 
a Khotal Oil Stove, made by the Hydro- 
Carbon Burner Co., listed at $4 ; or an Ideal 
Hunting Knife, made by W. L. Marble 
and listed at $2.50; or a .32 caliber Auto- 
matic Forehand Revolver, made by the 
Hopkins & Allen Arms Co. 

FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of Cruis- 
ings in the Cascades, cloth; or a set of Neh- 
ring's Convertible Ampliscopes, listed at 
$5.00; or an Ideal Hunting Knife made by 
W. L. Marble, and listed at $3 ; or a polished 
Buffalo Horn Gun Rack, made by E. W. Stiles, 

SIX subscriptions at $1 each, a Hawkeye Re- 
frigerating Basket made by the Burlington 
Basket Co., or one dozen Eureka golf balls 
listed at $4. 

SEVEN subscriptions at $1 each, a copy of 
The Big Game of North America, or of The 
American Book of the Dog, cloth, or one set 
Lakewood golf clubs, 5 in number, listing 
at $5. 

EIGHT subscriptions at $1 each, a 4 x 5 
Weno Hawk-Eye Camera, made by the 
Blair Camera Co., and listed at $8. 

NINE subscriptions at $1 each, an Acme 
single shot gun, made by the Davenport 
Arms Co., and listed at $8. 

TEN subscriptions at $1 each, a Cut- 
Glass Salad Bowl, made by Higgins & 
Seiter, and listed at $4. 50 ; or a Conley 
Combination Hunting Coat, listed at $8 ; or 
a Yawman & Erbe Automatic Reel, listed at 



$6 to $9; or a Bristol Steel Fishing Rod, 
listed at $6, or less; or a Single Barrel 
Shot Gun made by Harrington & Rich- 
ardson Arms Co.; or a Vv »..»,. ^?i*oof Wall 
Tent 7 x 7, made by D. T. Aber- 
crombie & Co., and listed at $8; or a canvas 
hunting coat, made by H. J. Upthegrove & 
Son, listed at $8. 

TWELVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Pea- 
body Carbine valued at $12; or a No. 5 
Sidle Telescope Rifle Sight, listed at $18; 
or a Davenport Ejector Gun, listed at $10. 

FIFTEEN subscriptions at$i each, a Shakes- 
peare Reel, Silver Plated, listed at $15 ; or a 
set of rabbit plates made by Higgins & Seiter, 
and listed at $8, or a pair of horsehide 
Hunting shoes, made by T. H. Guthrie, 
Newark, N. J. , and listed at $8, or a Field 
Glass made by Gall & Lembke. 

TWENTY subscriptions at $1 each, a 14-karat 
Gold Hunting-case Watch, with Waltham 
Movement, listed at $20; or a Repeating 
Rifle, listed at $16 or less ; or an Elita 
single shot gun, made by the Davenport 
Arms Co., and listed at $18, or a pair of 
horsehide Hunting Boots, made by T. H. 
Guthrie, Newark, N, J., and listed at $10. 

TWENTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, 
a Shattuck double hammerless gun, listed 
at $25; or a 11-foot King Folding Canvas 
Boat, listed at $38; or a Repeating Rifle, 
listed at $20 or less; or a 4x5 Planatic lens, 
made by the Rochester Lens Co., and listed 
at $25. 

THIRTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Field 
Glass, made by C. Y. Goerz;ora Repeating 
Rifle, listed at $25 or less; or a Waterproof 
Tent, 14^ x 17, made by D. T. Abercrombie 
& Co. , and listed at $25 ; or a corduroy hunt- 
ing suit, made by H. J. Upthegrove & Son, 
including coat, vest, trousers, and hat, 
listed at $23.75. 

THIRTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a 14- 
foot King Folding Canvas boat, listed at $48 ; 
or a Syracuse Grade O, double hammerless 
Gun, made by the Syracuse Arms Co. , and 
listed at $30. 

FORTY subscriptions at $1 each, a Savage 
.303 Repeating Rifle ; or a Mullins Duck 
Boat, listed at $20 ; or a No. 10 Gun Cab- 
inet, made by the West End Furniture Co., 
and listed at $32, or an Ithaca, quality 
No. 1, plain, double barrel, hammerless 
breech loading shot gun, listed at $40. 

FORTY-FIVE subscriptions at $1 each, a Royal 
Anastigmat Lens, 4x5, series I, made by 
Rochester Lens Co., and listed at $45. 

FIFTY subscriptions at $1 each, a No. 20 
Gun Cabinet, made by the West End 
Furniture Co., and listed at $38. 

ONE HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, a 
high grade Wilkesbarre Shot Gun, with Da- 
mascus barrels, listed at $125. 

TWO HUNDRED subscriptions at $1 each, a 
strictly first class upright piano, listed at $750. 
Address, 

Recreation ^tf street 



RECREATION. 



XXXV 




"Where are my 

President Suspenders?" 

( — and he had them on all the time) 

You don't feel the "President." That's the secret of its pop- 
ularity — the unconscious comfort of it. Gives such freedom 
and ease — conforms so readily to every bend of the body. 

PRESIDENT 

SUSPLNDLRS 

guaranteed if ''President" is on buckles. Trimmings cannot rust. 

Made heavy or light — also for youths. Everywhere 50c or by mail 
postpaid. Say light or dark — wide or narrow. 

C. A. EDGARTON MFG. CO., Box 219 B, Shirley. Mass. 



XXXVI 



RECREATION. 



fc 



SURE SHOT 

DESTROYS 





The puppy is liable to destruction from -worms. 'Tis the critical period 
in a dog's life. Canine worms meet "sure" destruction when 



SURE SHOT 



is administered. After that, it builds up the growing dogs constitution, 
develops bone and muscle. It makes thin, puny and weak -ouopies plump, 
animated and strong. 50c. by mail, prepaid. 

Sergeant's Condition Pills 

are the best liked and easiest to give of all alteratives and tonics. Incidentally 
any disease that a dog is likely to have will be speedily relieved and ulti- 
mately cured. Of dealers, 50c. and $1. By mail, prepaid. 

Sergeant's Carbolic Soft Soap 

is the "best ever" and for sale everywhere. 25c. of 
dealers. By mail 35c. 

An order, or 3c. in stamps will entitle you to our 
latest Dog Book and Pedigree blank, mailed free. 
For sale by "All Druggists & Sporting Goods Dealers." 

POLK MILLER DRUG CO., Richmond, Va. Dept. L. 




" Nothing so Ihre as Resting on Air." 



No 

Other 

Bed, 



anywhere, at 
any price, 
can compare 
with the 




DEFLATED AND ROLLED UP. 

A mattress 75x21 in. makes a 
bundle 7x14 in. and weighs 9 lbs. 




Most comfortable a man ever slept 
on. Lightest in existence. Strong, 
durable, guaranteed. At a fair price 
of all sporting goods dealers. 
ASK FOR 1902 PRICE LIST 

Pnevmatic Mattress and Cushion Co. 

4-th Floor 

35 Broadway, New York City 



DoYouKeepaGun? 

If so, would you not like a rack for it ? 

Do you keep more 
than one gun? 

If so, would you not like racks for all 
of them ? 

For 5 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION 

I will send you 

a pair of buffalo horns 

beautifully polished and mounted on nickel 
bases, which may be screwed on the wall. 
A pair of these horns make a unique and 
convenient gun rack, and a valuable trophy 
of the grandest game animal America ever 
had. 

These horns are easily worth 

five dollars 

a pair and sell readily at that price. I have 
been fortunate in securing a considerable 
number of them at a price that enables me 
to make this remarkable offer. 

Send in your Club at once* 



RECREATION, 



XXXVll 




V/^¥T c©lI\ do it 



just as well 

Pour over lumps of ice, strain a.nd serve 

SEVEN KINDS BEWARE OF IMITATIONS 



G. F. HEUBLEIN <& BRO, 

HARTFORD NEW YORK 



LONDON 



COMPACT ! 



POWERFUL ! 



COOKS ANYWHERE. 

The Khotal Gamp Stove. 




Burns Kerosene 



Burns ordinary kerosene without 
wick. No smell, no wet wood 
Hot meals and solid comfort. Heat regulated by self- 
cleaning needle valve, from a gentle simmering warmth to 
a temperature of 2,000° Fahrenheit. Send for Catalogue. 
Mention Recreation. 



Price, $3.75. 



The HYDRO-CARBON BURNER CO. 

197 Fulton St,, If «w York* 




Have a billiard room in your summer cottage. You need never then 
experience any difficulty entertaining your friends. Formerly billiards 
at home was a luxury beyond the means of most people. With our 
Indianapolis Combination Table 
Library ^ Dining ^ Billiards ^€ Pool 
everybody can have a billiard room in his summer cottage. It is a 
massive, beautifully made table, with dining or library top, which, re- 
moved, discloses a practical, well constructed billiard and pool table. 
The playing surface is as good in every way as that of the best standard 
size tables. Accurate angles, true balls, regulation cues, quick sensi- 
tive cushions and beds of superior Vermont slate. It thoroughly serves 
the purpose of four tables in the best possible manner. Sizes 94, %, 
Vs standard. Write us for illustrated catalogue of our many styles and 
designs, with full information, cash prices and our special payment 
plan. COMBINATION BILLIARD TABLB CO. 
jao *• Ctajpool Building ladtunapotlf ♦ lodtao* 



xxxvm 



RECREATION. 




GAME HEADS 
FUR RUGS 



A large line 

of 
Western 
Game Heads 

and 
Birds 
For Sale 

at 
Unheard-of 
Prices. 




Any 

kind or 
style Rug 
made to 
order at 
same rates. 

Well-made 
Western 
Bird Skins 
For Sale. 



I have purchased a large number of all kinds of 
western skins, including bear, lion, lynx, cat, wolf, 
etc., direct from the trappers, and can give you better 
prices on this line than any other dealer in the U. S. 

Enclose stamps for photos and price list. 



A. E. HAMMOND 



DARBY 



Taxidermist 



ESTABLISHED 1895. 



flONT. 




In the splendidly equipped 
RABBITRY of Drs. H. R. 
PHILLIPS & WREAN, 
Penn Yan, N, Y., are some 
of the finest 

IMPORTED BUCKS, 

Lord Roberts, Prince of Leeds, Jr., Fashoda, Jr,, 
and a fine line of BREEDING DOES at reason- 
able figures and warranted to be correct, young, 

PEDIGREED STOCK, 

$6. for a TRIO during JULY and AUGUST. 

but no later. 

DRS. H. R. PHILLIPS & WREAN, Penn 

Yan, JN. Y. Mention Recreation. 



FLYING SQUIRRELS. 



For a short time 
only I will give a 
pair of these hand- 
some little pets for 2 yearly subscriptions to Recrea- 
tion. For 3 subscriptions I will give a Fox Squirrel, or 
for 6 subscriptions a pair of Fox Squirrels. For 5 sub- 
scriptions I will give a Raccoon. Will collect almost 
anything in the natural history line indigenous to this 
locality in exchange f oryearly subscriptions to Recrea- 

tion. E. F. POPE, 
Colmesneil, Texas. 

THE "DERBY" HOMING L0F3 

Green Spring Avenue, 
ARLINGTON, - MARYLAND. 

Importers and breeders of Speedy, 
Reliable Flying Pigeons in all 
colors. Youngsters from 550-mile stock can be 
shipped same day orders are received at $3.00 
per pair; two pair $5.00. 

Correspondence Solicited. 




Genesee Valley Poultry Yards, 

J^VOTST, TsT. Y. 

S. C. White Leghorns — Large, White, Hardy. 
Good Layers. Mammoth Pekin Ducks, Prize- Win- 
ning Barred Rocks, Buff Wyandottes. Belgian Hares 
equal to pedigreed stock, at low prices. 

Eggs for hatching, $J.OO for J 5, until September Jst. 
Write Wants. Mention Recreation. 



Taxidermist's Materials 

Glass Eyes for Stuffed Birds and Animals 
Oologist's and Entomologist's Supplies 

Send J c. ir stamps for Catalogue 

FRED. KAEMPFER 
88 State Street, Chicago, 111. 

Taxidermy work done in all its branches 

FLORIDA BIRDS 

Collectors will note that many of our species have 
been recently added to A. O. U. list. 

I have fine mounted specimens and skins of the rare 
Ardea occidentalis. Hon. John Lewis Childs' exhibit of 
Game Birds at the last Sportsman's Show should be 
sufficient guarantee of the quality of my work. 

R.. D. HOYT, Taxidermist 

Seven Oaks, Florida 



IMNE MOUNTED GAME HEADS. 
BIRDS, ETC.. for sale at unheard-of prices. 
Send 10 cents for photos. 
JOHN CLAYTON, Taxidermist, Lincoln, Maine, 



THE 

RIDEAU 

LAKES 



The Rideau River, lakes and canal, 
a unique region, comparatively un- 
known, but affording the most novel 
experience of any trip in America. 
An inland waterway between the St. 
Lawrence River at Kingston and the 
Ottawa River at Ottawa ; every mile 
affords a new experience. It is briefly 
described in No. 34 of the " Four 
Track Series," "To Ottawa, Ont., 
Via the Rideau Lakes and River " 



Copy will be mailed free on receipt, of a 2-cent 
stamp by George H. Daniels, General Passenger 
Agent, New York Central & Hudson River Railroad, 
Grand Central Station, New York. 



RECREATION. xxxix 



GOING DUCK SHOOTING? 



IF SO, YOU SHOULD HAVE A 



Conlcy Combination Hunting 
Coat and Vest 



Made of 8 oz. Rubberized Duck, Dead Grass Color 



You can use it for i 
A LONG RAIN COAT 

A SHORT HUNTING COAT 

A DUCK BLIND 

OR A SLEEPING BAG 

Game pockets and cartridge holders ad lib. 
Save yourself from dampness and cold. 



Send me 

5 Yearly Subscriptions to RECREATION 

Name your size and I will send yon one of these coats. 

Sample copies of Recreation, for use in canvassing, furnished on application. 



xl 



RECREATION. 



Date, 



190 



G. 0. 5HIELDS, 

Editor and Manager of RECREATION, 23 West 24th St., New York. 
Herewith find $1.00 for which please send me RECREATION one year 



beginning with. 



number. 



Name,. 



Remit by P. O. or Express Money Order, or New York Draft. 

DETACH THIS. FILL OUT, AND SEND IN".. 



1 THE TETON GUIDES' | 



ALLEN'S FOOTEASE 



ASSOCIATION. 

«{X The attention of sportsmen is called to The 

«£j Teton Guides' Association of Jackson's Hole, 

«£r Wyo., where there is plenty of big game, elk, 

<£j deer, antelope, mountain-sheep and bear, and 

«£j numerous small fur-bearing animals. Trout fish- 

-{3 ing in abundance. 

■fe Hunting parties outfitted and guided by compe- 

•$X tent guides at fair and equitable prices, through 

*(X Yellowstone Park and game regions of Jackson's 

"vJ Hole. For information, address 

| Secretary Teton Guides' Association, 



JACKSON, WYOMING. 






i£W WWW W W W# tpp2Jp$j$jp$j«J2J<jfi 



"Oh,WhatRest 
and Comfort!" 



SHAKE INTO YOUR SHOES 

Allen's Foot=Ease, a powder for the 
feet. It cures painful, swollen, smarting, 
nervous feet, and instantly takes the sting 
out of corns and bunions. It's the great- 
est comfort discovery of the age. 
Makes tight-fitting or new shoes feel easy. 
It is a certain cure for ingrowing nails, 
sweating, callous and hot, tired, aching feet. 
We have over 30,000 testimonials. TRY 
IT TO-DAY. Sold byall Druggists and 
Shoe Stores, 25c. Do not accept an imi- 
tation. Sent by mail for 25c. in stamps. 

TRIAL PACKAGE 

sent by mail, 

MOTHER GRAY'S SWEET 

POWDERS) the best medicine for Fe- 
verish, Sickly Children. Sold by Druggists 
everywhere. Trial Package FREE. Ad- 
dress, ALLEN S. OLMSTED, Le Roy, N.Y. 



RELICS OIF A DISAPPEARING RACE 



BUFFALO SKULLS 



WITH POLISHED OR 
UNPOLISHED HORNS 



Also polished or unpolished horns in pairs or single. Polished horns tipped with incandescent 
electric lights; polished hunting horns; mirrors hung in polished horns, etc. These are decided 
novelties and are in great demand for sportsmen's dens, offices, club-rooms, halls, etc. Send for 
illustrated catalog. Mention RECREATION. 

E. W. STILES, 141 Washington St., Hartford, Conn. 



APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THE L. A. S, 

ARTHUR P. RICE, Secretary L. A. S., 23 W. 24th St., New York, 

Dear Sir: Enclosed $i for membership fee for one year. 

I certify that I am eligible to membership in the L. A. S. under the 
provisions of the constitution, and refer to 2 League members (or to 3 
other reputable citizens) named hereon. 

Name 



P=J 



Street or P. O. Box.. 



City or Town. 



Detach this, till out and send In. 



RECREATION. 



xli 



FOR SALE AND EXCHANGE. 
For Sale : i 4x5 Premo long focus cam- 
era, fitted with 5x7 R. & O. symmetrical lens 
and Victor shutter (lens and shutter new); 
1 sole leather carrying case, 3 heavy print- 
ing frames, 3 R. slide plate holders, 1 B. & J. 
yellow screen, 1 B. & J. W. angle lens; ex- 
cellent condition; correspondence solicited. 
M. I. Mellon, Ponca, Neb. 

For Exchange : One Wizard C. jr. Cam- 
era, 5x7, with case and 2 plate holders, cost 
$30, for 4x5 Premo Camera, or good repeat- 
ing rifle of equal value. One No. 2 bullet 
Kodak, cost $10, for Colt's or Smith & Wesson 
revolver. Both cameras are almost new and 
in excellent condition. 

W. A. Mason, Radcliffe, Iowa. 



For Sale or Exchange : A splendid 
moose horn, 11 points, will sell for $15 or 
exchange for good field glass, Stevens 
pocket 22-caliber pistol, 12-inch barrel, or 
some useful article. If party lived in 
Oregon would trade for good collie dog. 
Richard Harrison, Grant's Pass, Oregon. 



For Sale or Exchange : New 30 caliber 
Marlin take down, with or without Lyman 
sights and reloading tools, or exchange for 
Winchester Repeating Shot Gun, 12 gauge, 
Model '97, or Winchester 25-20, Model '92. 

For particulars, address, 
O. S. De Land, Jasper, Lenawee Co., Mich. 



For Sale : 4x5 Magazine Cyclone im- 
proved camera and outfit, new, cost $14, 
sell for $10 ; 3^x3^ camera and outfit, nearly 
new, $2; magic lantern and slides, with 
attachment for enlarging pictures, $3 Box 
250, Ogden, Iowa. 



For Sale : Ithaca hammer gun, listing at 
$35, in fine condition, twist barrels, $17, 
cash; 4x5, Wizard B camera, listing at $16, 
used but a few times, $7.50. Roy Saxton, 
Litchfield, Mich. 



For Sale : Batavia Leader shot gun 
used only a few times. A good serviceable 
gun that looks and is as good as new. Cost 
$25. Sell for $16. G. F. Axtell, 

117 Howard St., Detroit, Mich. 



For Sale : Engineer's transit, cost $225 ; 
will take gun, microscope or surgical chair 
as part payment, balance cash. W. K. 
Yorks, Norwood Park, Chicago, 111. 

For Sale : 16-foot Gasoline Launch, 
nearly new, leather upholstered, canopy 
top, everything complete. John H. Lynds, 
White Cloud, Kansas. 



For Sale: One 32-20 Winchester Repeat- 
ing Rifle, in perfect condition, open sights. 
Address Wm, I. Morton, Russellville, Ky. 



Wanted, to buy a few live gray Squirrels. 
Address, S. G., care Recreation. 



SQUIRES' SIBERIAN MOOSE 
HUNTING BOOTS & SHOES 

Made only by HENRY C. SQUIRES <S. SON 
20 Crtlandt St., New York 

The leather is waterproof, fine grained, 
tough and pliable. The 
linings are russet calf- 
skin. The soles are 
best waterproof anhy- 
drous oak 1 cat her, 
stitching of silk, Eng- 
lish back stays, bulldog 
toes, extra heavy eye- 
lets, Pratt fasteners 
and hand made 
throughout. Price 
$7.50 net. Short Boots 
$8.50, Knee Boots 
$10, Cavalry Style 
Boots $12. 
Special circular 
giving detailed 
information 
free for the 
asking. 




Mention Recreation. 



The Cebrated 







h\ THOMPSON- 
QUIMBY 

Hunting 
Boots, 
Shoes and 
Mocca- 



have 
on file 
measure- 
ments of 
all old cus- 
tomers who 
have bought 
the celebrated 
Thompson Hunt- 
ing Boots and 
Shoes of the W. 
FredQuimby Co. 
of New York for 
the past 20 years, 
and am prepared 
to make the same 
grade of sports- 
men's footwear 
as in the past. I 
was formerly superintendent 
of the shoe department of that 
firm and have bought out the 
right to make these boots and shoes 
Measurement blanks and prices or 
application. Mention Recreation 

T. H. Guthre 

33 William Street, NEWARK, 




sins 

All Work 
Guaran- 
teed 




xlii RECREATION. 



Here Is Another 

> 

If you will send me 

40 Yearly SuDSGrlptions (o RECPTlOji 

I will send you 

A No. 10 Qoerz Trieder= Bin- 
ocular Field Glass 

Listed at $38.00 



Every well-informed man knows the great power of this 
modern prismatic field glass. It is indispensable to every 
hunter, and is one of the latest and best on the market. 

I have but a few of these instruments on hand and the offer 
will be withdrawn as soon as the supply is exhausted. There- 
fore, if you want one 

Start Immediately 

Sample copies of RECREATION for use in canvassing 
furnished on application. 



RECREATION. 



Tiff 
WORLDS 
STANDARD 



%Ai 



They re made to measure 

Putman Boots 

Go on like a qlove^"^ fit all over. 



For a Quarter of a Century Putman Boots have been the 
Standard among Western Hunters, Prospectors, Ranchmen and En- 
gineers (who demand the best) and we have learned through our per- 
sonal contact with them how to make a perfect boot. 
! Putman Boots are in use in nearly every civilized country in the 
World. They are Genuine Hand Sewed, Water Proof, Made to Meas- 
ure, Delivery charges prepaid, and cost no more than others. Send for 
Catalogue of over 30 different styles of boots. Also Indian 
Tanned Moosehide Moccasins* 



Illustration shows No. 900, 14 inches high, .Bellows Tongue, Made on any style 
toe desired, Uppers are Special Chrome Tanned Call Skin, tanned with the grain of 
the hide left on; (Our Special Tannage) making the leather water proof, black or 
brown color, large eyelets and wide leather laces, laced at side to fit boot tight around 
top, sole, light, medium or heavy. The soles are Genuine Hand Sewed, (making them 
soft and easy) and made of the best Water Proof Oak Sole Leather. 

Made to measure and delivered in the U. S., Canada or 07 Kfi 
Mesicpfpr.... $f iUU 



H, J, PUTMAN & CO. 




36 HENNEPIN AVE. 



MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



Send for Order Blank 

showing 

how to measure your Toot. 



CONLEY'S COMBINATION HUNTING COAT AND VEST. 



The Host Useful 
Coat to Sportsmen 




It is made of the 
best 8-oz. plain and 
rubberized duck of 
dead grass color, and 
is absolutely water- 
proof. 

Order direct from the 
factory. The hunter 
is our only agent. 

Rubteizeil, - $5.00 
Unrnlteizeil - 4.50 

You can use it for a 
long rain coat, a duck 
blind or sleeping bag. 
You can save yourself 
from dampness and 
cold, which costs 
money in the end. It 
will last a lifetime. 

Enclose stamp for 
booklet. 
Mention Recreation. 



Joseph, lVTo« 



urn 



xliv 



RECREATION. 



*' AMERICA'S 
SUMMER 



RESORTS 



ft 



This is one of the most complete 
publications of its kind, and will as- 
sist those who are wondering where 
they will go to spend their vacation 
this summer. 

It contains a valuable map, in addi- 
tion to much interesting information 
regarding resorts on or,ieached by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 



A copy will be sent free, postpaid, to any address 
on receiot of a two-ceDt stamp, by George H. 
Daniels, General Passenger Agent, New York Cen- 
tral & Hudson River Railroad, Grand Central Sta- 
tion, New York. 



50c. Sheet Music 

I "7^ j Any 6 for $I.OO. 

I/V/b j ALL POSTPAID. 

Janice Meredith Waltzes. 

Creole Belles Two-Step or Seng. 
Tie that Binds, Song. Ain't Dat a Shame, Song. 

Tale of a Kangaroo, March. 
My Little GeorgiaRose, Song. 

Daisy and Butterfly, Song. 
Mosquitoes' Parade, Two-Step. 
Girl I Loved in Sunny Tennessee, Song or 

Waltz. 
Just as the Sun Went Down, Song or Waltz. 
Ben Hur Chariot Race, March. 

Hello, Central, Song. 
Catalogue free; contains thousands of pieces, 
popular and classic, at above prices, also at 9 
cents or twelve for $1.00. 

THE C. MYREX MUSIC CO. 
35 West 21st Street, - New York City 



The 

WEST 5H0RE 
RAILROAD 



One of the leading Trunk Lines of America. 

Runs along the west side of the historic Hudson 

River. 
Through the foothills of the Catskill Mountains. 

Through the beautiful Mohawk Valley. 

Crossing the Genesee River at Rochester. 

Reaching Buffalo, Niagara Falls and Suspen- 
sion Bridge. 

Connecting at Buffalo for Chicago and the West. 

Having also connections for Cincinnati and St 
Louis. 



Present fares from New York by the West Shore 
are as follows : 

$8.00 to Buffalo or Niagara Falls; $18.00 
to Chicago; $14.00 to Detroit ; $12.00 to 
Cleveland; $21.25 to St. Louis; $15.00 to 
Cincinnati. 

For particulars call on any West Shore Ticket Agent, 
or address 

C. E. LAMBERT, H. B. JAGOE t 

General Passenger Agent. Gen'l Eastern Passenger Agt. 

7 East 42d St.. New York 359 Broadway, New Yoik 



FREE BOOK, WEAK MEN 

My illustrated nature book on losses, 
varicocele, impotency, lame back, 
free, sealed, by mail. Much valuable 
advice and describes the new DR. 
SANDEN HERCULEX ELEC- 
.TRIC BELT. Worn nights. No 
,..,„, drug's. Currents soothing. Used 
0y H)y women also for rheumatic pains, 
etc. 5,000 cures igoi. Established 
30 years. Advice free. 
Dr.G.B. SANuEN, 1155 Broadway, New York 

EXCESSIVE GROWTH OF HAIR STOPPED. 

Removed instantaneously by new, safe remedy. Guar- 
anteed not to injure the skin. Sent on receipt of $1.00. 

MRS. G. J. WILSON, P. 0. BOX 444, K. Y. 

Mention Recreation. 



IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO NA- 
TURE, READ RECREATION. 





MARRED BEAUTY 



Mme. Benoit's 
Russian Depilatory 

Instantaneously Removes 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

without torturing, blistering, discoloring or leaving 
any blotcb, signs or other ill effect on the skin. It is an 
effective, instantaneous, harmless remedy. 

Send for Booklet Giving Full Information. 

MME. BEN9IT, 2 East 42d Street, New York City. 

Mention Recreation. 



RECREATION. xlv 



Want a Reel ? 

You can get one for nothing* 

Or at least for a few hours' work, 



SEND ME 

20 yearly subscriptions 

TO 

RECREATION 

and I will send you 

A TALBOT REEL 

Listed at $20, 

Made by W. H. Talbot, Nevada, Mo. 

This is one of the finest pieces of fishing tackle ever made. 

It is built like a gold watch. Equal to any Kentucky reel 

you ever saw. In tournaments, always a victor. 

Among the angler's treasures, always the chief. 

I have but a few of these reels in stock, and this offer 
will be withdrawn as soon as the present supply is exhausted. 

Sample copies of Recreation for use in canvassing fur- 
nished on application. 



xlvi 



RECREATION. 



A BELLIGERENT BUCK. 

The Black Dog mountain region in 
Pennsylvania is reputed a great deer coun- 
try. When I found opportunity to 
spend 2 days there last fall -I thought 
myself lucky. It snowed hard the first day 
of my stay, but I spent the time in the 
woods locating the feeding grounds. By 
sunrise next morning I had 2 deer on the 
move. When they crossed the first clear- 
ing I was too far away to shoot. There 
they separated, and I followed the largest, 
a 5-prottg buck. I trailed him hours, over 
mountain after mountain. Then he began 
to lag, thinking probably that I was not so 
dangerous as he had at first supposed. 
Finding he was heading through a long 
ravine, I made a detour, and waited for 
him at the other end. 

He came in view about 70 yards <tway 
and I fired, breaking his shoulder. He fell. 
I waited a few minutes, ready to give him 
another shot if he needed it. As he did 
not move, I approached him, laid down 
my gun, and drew my knife. I again 
moved forward, and, to my amazement, he 
sprang up and charged me. I dodged be- 
hind a tree, but seeing one of his forelegs 
/ was useless, I grabbed him by the horns. 
During the tussle I was dragged hopelessly 
far from my gun, and at last he broke 
loose. I moved to get nearer, and again 
he charged. I caught him once more by 
the horns, and by his wounded foreleg. 

There we were again. I had the buck 
and he had me. I had dropped my knife, 
and dared not loosen either grip, lest my 
game escape. As far as I knew, there 
was no one else on the mountain ; but my 
only chance was to yell, and I yelled my 
best. 

The farm-house at which I was stopping 
was over a mile away. Nevertheless, 2 of 
the boys heard me, and, after a time that 
seemed weeks, came to my assistance. 
They held the buck while I knifed him, and 
we 3 had all we could do to hang him up. 
His head now adorns my parlor, but when 
I think of all my work and the taxider- 
mist's bill, I sometimes think he was hardly 
worth it. 

S. A. McDonald, Harrisburg, Pa. 



Will someone explain why the so-called 
shot gun smokeless powder can not be used 
in a rifle? Also, why smokeless can not 
be used in a muzzle loader? Gunmakers 
once said the same of black powder, yet the 
best shooting I ever did was with a fine, 
high grade of rifle powder in a muzzle 
loading shot gun. 

M. E. B., Belleplain, N. J. 



I received the Forehand revolver. It was 
like finding it. It is a good shooter and 
is all right. 

R. Harrocks, Fonda, N, Y, 



THE GARDEN OF EDEN TO DATE. 

My experience is that a cinnamon bear 
will not fight under any circumstances. 
Even in a trap he will whine like a big 
pup. They grow large, and powerful, and 
are destructive to cattle, but have no 
stomach for a scrap. The silvertip is al- 
ways ready and dangerous until dead. 

Last fall while camping on Elk creek, 
Routt county, Colo., we named the place 
the Garden of Eden, because there were 
acres and acres of red raspberries, June 
berries, choke berries and wild grapes. 
The trout were all one size, 12 inches long. 
Deer were plentiful, grouse abundant, and 
there was enough mineral in sight to please 
an old prospector. There were a few wood" 
ticks, but no snakes. While in camp there, 
a party of 9 mail clerks from Omaha came 
along, and the sight of a fine buck strung 
up beside the tent and a string of a dozen 
fish just from the water, set them almost 
wild. In order to start them off right we 
gave them a ham of venison for supper, 
it being late in the evening. We heard 
nothing more of the boys until the next 
night when they came by the camp again, 
footsore and tired, but with no deer. We 
furnished more venison. Fortunately one 
of their party was an angler, and brought 
in plenty of trout. The third evening along 
came the boys again, empty handed. We 
offered them a hindquarter for supper, 
whereon the leader modestly remarked, 

"To with your meat ; if we can't kill 

enough, we'll starve." They broke camp 
next morning and went down on White 
river, where it was reported there were 
more deer. 

There is only one camera for a hunter, 
an Eastman No. 3. With a 30-40 carbine, 
a Kodak and a prospector's pick, a camp 
among game, fish and wild fruits, a mat- 
tress of pine boughs and a clear conscience, 
what more could one desire? We are go- 
ing again next year, and we shall not for- 
get the pick either. Our last assay ran $92 
to the ton. 

Sam Stevens, Cripple Creek, Colo. 



Until last fall I used a 30-30 Winchester 
for deer hunting. Then, inspired by an 
article in Recreation, I bought a 25-35. 
With it I crippled a doe and a 10-prong 
buck, and as there was no snow on which 
to track them, I lost both. The doe was 
running at full speed and was hit, I should 
judge, in the flank or hind quarter. She 
fell, but rose unsteadily and disappeared 
before I could tire again. The buck was 
struck in the shoulder and fell to his knees. 
They are the only wounded deer I ever 
lost, and I feel sure that had I had a 30 I 
would have secured both. I traded the 
25 for a 30-40, and the next deer I shot did 
not run 100 feet. I want a lighter gun 
for my next hunt, but am undecided 
whether to buy a 30-30 carbine or a 38-55. 
Should be glad to have your readers ad- 
vise me. A. Huff, Minneapolis, Minn. 



RECREATION. 



xlvii 



Canadian Big: Game 



HTHE time for the turning of the leaf will soon have come: the velvet on the antler is 
pealing in long strips, leaving a clean horn the color of buckskin. Soon the law will 
permit the shooting of the moose, caribou and deer — and wouldn't you care for a head or 
two yourself ? 

Well, why not try Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba or some other of the sisterhood of the 
Canadian Provinces ? By such a choice you would probably be successful beyond your 
expectations, as many others have been. Only the other day a well-known physician of 
Winchester, Ky., wrote : "I met you last summer at Hotel Bellevue, Timiskaming, and 
you kindly located a camping party for me on Ostaboining where they had fine sport; get- 
ting several moose deer and fine fishing. I wish to get some information regarding, etc." 

Equally trustworthy information is at your disposal. Ontario has thrown open her 



jealously guarded big 
caribou and deer be- 
November 15th north 
Railway, from 
Port Arthur, a 
mous in extent 
a heavy stock 

The great 
Quebec yet 
as the home of 
deer and the 
bathes and 
Kipawa as of 
head obtained 
treal sportsman 
Gatineau, an 
Ottawa, flows through 
the continent, while 
similar and almost equally 

Further east the St. Maurice, 
to mouth, traverses a land of rock 
the caribou and the bear find very 




game preserves, the shooting of moose, 
ing now permitted from October 15th to 
of the main line of the Canadian Pacific 

Mattawa to 

region enor- 

and carrying 

of game. 

province o f 

holds its own 

vast quantities of 

giant bull moose 

feeds in the great Lake 

yore. Last Autumn a 

m this region by a Mon- 

spanned 62 inches. The 

important tributary of the 

one of the best deer ranges of 

Lievre, Rouge and Nord drain 

well-stocked regions. 

a stream 400 miles from source 

and barren which the moose, 

much to their tastes. 



Manitoba is as noted for its moose as for its duck and chicken, and those who can 
spare the time may ensure a successful hunt by visiting the Prairie Province. Beyond 
lie the Territories and British Columbia, with their hundreds of thousands of square miles 
of plain, forest and mountain, offering unsurpassed hunting for moose, elk, blacktail, 
sheep, goat and grizzly. 

For further information write to any officer or agent of the 

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, 

or to 353 Broadway, New York, N. Y.; 629-631 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa.; 
129 East Baltimore St., Baltimore, Md.; 1229 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D. C.j 

304 Washington St., Boston, Mass.; 235 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y.; 

7 Fort St., West, Detroit, Mich.; 228 So. Clark St., Chicago, 111. 

ROBERT KERR. Passenger Traffic flanager, HONTREAL 



xlviii 



RECREATION. 




Submerged Electric Motor Co. 

GENERAL OFFICE WORKS, MENOHONIE, WISCONSIN 
PORTABLE FRESH AND SALT 
WATER PROPELLERS 

Attached to a double-ender or any boat in a moment. 
Absolutely practical; Noiseless, Odorless and Safe! 
Nothing to get out of order or explode. Runs in shal- 
k low water and is the correct thing for Hunting and 
Fishing. Nothing so desirable for boating. We make 
the best Motor Generators and Gasoline Generators 
for any purpose. 

Outfit of Boat— 16 ft— and Fresh Water Motor 
for Lake, with 2-box Battery, $195.00. 

Send for full information and catalogue. 

Gen'l Sales Office, R. 329 Hennepin Ave. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 



™* Steel Rod Shortener 




Convert your fly rod into a bait east'ng or boat rod. Made of brass and 
nickel plated. Remove the first joint and set the Shottener into the 
handle and the second joint into the Shortener. Sent, Postage paid, 50c. 

GEO. H. HELMER, 144 Superior St., Cleveland, 0. 

Fl Y FKHFRMFN~ 0n recei P t of self-addressed 
IL1 noflLnmLll envelope I will send one of 
McNaughton's sure catch flies. Address 

C. L. McNAUGHTON, Franklin, Ind. 



THE 
FOUR-TRACK 

NEWS 



AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 
OF TRAVEL AND EDUCATION. 

Published Monthly by the 

Passenger Department of the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL 

& HUDSON RIVER R. R. 



The Four-Track News will be sent free to any 
address lor a year on receipt of 50 cents. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Address George H. Daniels, General 
Passenger Agent, Grand Central Station, New York. 



I have received the Century camera 
which you sent for club of subscribers and 
thank you for the promptness, cour- 
tesy and generosity you have shown. The 
camera surpasses my fondest expectations, 
and I feel that you have simply made me a 
present of it. I have shown it to a dozen 
or more of the boys and they all admire 
it greatly. 

Chas. B. Funk, Cleveland, O. 

SOME GOOD GUIDES. 

Following are names and addresses of guides 
who have been recommended to me, by men 
who have employed them ; together with data 
as to the species of game and fish which these 
guides undertake to find for sportsmen. 

If anyone who may employ one of these 
guides should find him incompetent or un- 
satisfactory, I will be grateful if he will report 
the fact to me. 

FLORIDA. 
Cason Bros., Frostproof, bear, deer, turkeys, quail, 

snipe. 
C H.Stokes, Mohawk, deer, alligators, turkey, quad 

and snipe. 

IDAHO. 
John Ching, Kilgore, elk, bear, deer, antelope, moun- 
tain sheep, trout and grouse. 
Chas. Pettys, Kilgore, ditto 

MAINE. 
W. C. Holt, Hanover, moose, caribou, deer, grouse, 

and trout. 
H. R. Horton, Flagstaff, bear, moose, fox, grouse and 

trout. 

MONTANA. 
James Blair, Lakeview, elk, bear, deer, trout and 

grouse. 
A. T. Leeds, Darby, ditto 

Chas. Marble, Chestnut, ditto 

Wm. R. Waugh, Darby, moose, bear, elk, deer, sheep, 

grouse and trout. 

A. Leeds, Hamilton, ditto 

VIRGINIA. 
W. T. Gladding, New Church deer, turkeys, quail. 

WYOMING. 
Frank L. Peterson, Jackson, elk, bear, deer, moun- 
tain sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
S. N. Leek, Tackson, ditto 

James L. McLaughlin, Valley, elk, bear, deer, moun- 
tain sheep, antelope, grouse and trout. 
Felix Alston, Irma, ditto 

CANADA. 
W. A. Brewster, Banff, Rocky Mountain Park, 

Can., bear, sheep, goats, grouse and trout. 
Wm. S. Andrews, Lillooet, B. C, deer, bear, moun- 
tain sheep, goats, grouse and trout. 

B. Norrad, Boieztown, B. C-, moose, caribou, 
grouse and trout. 



RECREATION. 



xlix 





• 



WsagaflsaEsssg 



Established 1840 

Geo. B.Carpenter& Co. 



Fishing 
Feting 



MAKERS OF HIGH GRADE 



TEHTS, SAILS, CAMP FI1ITH 



Folding Cots 

Tables and Chairs |p£ 

< 



Oars, Paddles 
Marine Hardware 




•«fc=^-^r 



COPT * 1699 

ceo.B. Carpenter 6 



sfe. 



The La-rgest and Most Complete Stock in the U.S 

Send 4C. in stamps for Tent and Camp Catalogue, or 
6c. in stamps for Marine Hardware Catalogue. 

200, 202, 204, 206, 2085. Water St., Chicago, 111 








Do you want a Good, Reliable 
Substantial, Well Made 

Single Barrel Slot Gn 

If so, send me 
JO YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS 

, and I will send you such a 
Gun as a premium 

It is made by the DA VENPORT ARMS 
CO., and this means it is made of good 
material and that only good workmanhip 
is put on it. 

This is one of the many remarkable op- 
portunities RECREATION is offering to 
men and boys to fit themselves out com- 
pletely for shooting and fishing. 

Sample Copies for Use in Canvassing 
Furnished on Application. 

Address 

RECREATION 

23 W. 24th St., New York City 



Fisk's Aerating 
Minnow Pail 



J§®= The only- 
Minnow Pail 
in which Min- 
nows can be 
kept alive in- 
definitely. 

Has an air 
chamber at 
the bottom 
holding26ocu- 
bic inches of 
condensed air 
forced in by 
the Air Pump 
attached, and 
by a simple 
rubber attach- 
ment the air is 
allowed to es- 
cape into the 
water gradu- 
ally, supply- 
ing the fish 
with the oxygen consumed by them. One pumping 
is sufficient for ten hours. 

Height, i foot; diameter, 10 inches; weight, 7 J£ 
lbs.; water, 2 l A gallons; keeps £c to 150 minnows, ac- 
cording to their size. 

IT KEEPS THEM ALIVE. 

Price, $5 net— Sold direct 

Send for Circular. Mention Recreation. 

J. M. KENYON ®. CO. 

Toledo, Ohio, U. S. A. 




RECREATION. 



A King Folding Canvas Boat 

IS MADE TO GIVE 

YEARS OF HARD SERVICE, Jull/AimeKiiJi modeled BY HAND NOTBY 
MACHINERY Its indestructible steel frame is made to stand salt water by heavy galvanizing. NO BAG- 
GING between the ribs is possible owing to the automatic tension of the Spring Steel Frame of 12 longitudinal 
and 1 3 diagonal ribs. This ribbing is covered by U. S. patents. Makes the 

SMALLES T and NEATEST PACKAGE of any FOLDING BOAT 

With Air Chambers in 
They Float 

100 pounds 

Bottom Boards 

-*~- ■■- — - ■■" " '• 

Rest on the 
Frame 




ll=foot Special 



Not on the 
Canvas 

They are Stiifer than a Wooden Boat 
because the lines are fuller, and are much 
easier to row or paddle. 

Send 6c. for Catalogue No. I—60 illus- 
trations and 250 testimonials. 



King Folding Canvas Boat Co., Kalamazoo, riich., u. s. a. 




ACME FOLDING BOAT CO., BflAMISBUKtt, O. 



U. S. Government who prefer our boats. 

Fair. If you investigate we will get your order. 



Send for catalogue of our full line of Folding 
Canvas Boats and Canoes, which have been 
adopted by Governments of United States, 
Canada and England. Just filled an order for 
Received medal and award at Chicago World's 

Mention Recreation, .-■• •••■ _*, 



Acme Folding Boa^t Company, Mi©Lmisb\irg, O. 



VISIBLESPARK 



CAXB 



REVERSE CLUTCH 



SLOWEDTOIMitPER-HR? 



ROCHESTER^ 
GAS ENGINE Cor 



ROCHESTER N.Y 




Luxurious 
Launches 

Fay & Bowen 
Launches are the 
very finest in con- 
struction and fin- 
ish; equipped with 
the famous Fay& 
Bowen Motors, which start when started, 

and run until you stop them. No crank or handle. 

A perfect and unique Ignitor. Motors from x% to 

2s H. P. Send for catalogue. 

Fay & Bowen, 28 Mill St., Auburn, N. Y. 



P 1 P| P" P" To everyone who will send in a 
LULL subscription to RECREATION: 
through me I will give, free, a photo 
1 * *" ™ of the late President McKinley; or 
of the Esplanade, or any of the buildings at the Pan- 
American Exposition. These photos are all on 
Velox or Aristo paper. The one of President 
McKinley was made September 6th, the day he was 
shot. All prints perfect. F.E.WILKINSON, 
172 Woodlawn Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

FRBE! 

To each person sending me $1 P. O. Monev 
Order for subscription to Recreation, I will 
send one 25-yard Martin's Braided Silk Line, 
one-fourth dozen Trout Flies, one-fourth 
dozen Snelled Hooks, single gut, and one- 
half dozen ringed hooks. My compass offer 
in preceding issues is still open if preferred. 
EDWARD S. ADAMS. Box 536, Manchester , N. H. 



RECREATION. 



li 





A PLEASURE CRAFT, 

In the use of which, you are tranquil in Mind, Body and 
Estate. It is Safe to use, Sure to go, Economical to 
maintain. It's the kind that's 

"ALL RIGHT, ALL THE TIME." 

Built upon lines of Grace and Beauty, with Strength, Power and 

Speed. Send 10 cents for Launch and Marine Engine Catalog "L " 

WESTERN GAS ENGINE CO., Mishawaka, Ind. 




MULLI NS' 

METAL 

"BOA TS Asn> 
CAJVOES 

Be sure and order one for your 
vacation this summer and you 
will have it to use every vaca- 
tion. They last a life time. 

Handsome catalogue, profusely illustrated, sent free on application. 




228 Depot Street, 



MULLTNS, 

SALEM. 



OHIO. 



Linenoid Sectional Canoe. 




Length, 14 feet ; Beam, 30 inches ; Depth bow, 18 inches ; 

Depth stern, 16 inches ; Depth amidships, 14 inches ; 

Weight, 50 pounds ; Length when nested, 5 feet. 

Furnished with one N. J. Double Paddle, one 

pair Combination Handles, six mats for 

bottom, and finished in handsome colors. 

Price, - - - $40.00. 



Owing to our process of moulding the Linen- 
oid Canoes, we are enabled to build a canoe in 
three sections, so that when it is put together, 
which is very easily done, it is as staunch and 
water tight as if built in one. One great advan- 
tage in a Sectional Canoe is the saving in trans- 
portation charges. 



I Rusbton Canoes | 



1 



"The Quintessence of Canoe Quality.' 1 '' 

"INDIAN" CCli» MODEL 







Model Yacht Hulls. 




Length, 31 inches ; Bea#», .8 inches ; Depth amidships, 
4% insjfoes. 

Price, - - . $2,00, 



CR.ANE BROS.. Westfield. Mass. 
Manufacturers of Linenoid Seamless Goods 



Grade A, $38 to $40. Grade B, $30 to $33, 



Length, 15 ft.; beam, 32 in.; depth at center, 12 in. Oak, 

cedar and cherry frame, canvas cover. 

Weight, 56 to 66 lbs. 

Some canoes are quite strong, but slow ; 
others are quite fast, but fragile ; but in the 

RUSHTON CANOE 

you will find strength and speed combined. 
I make my canoes out of air-seasoned Mich- 
igan white cedar, and I also make a specialty 
of canvas covered cedar canoes. Better see 
my models before you decide to buy. 

My Illustrated 80-page catalogue is sent free 
on request. 

J. H. RUSHTON, 817 Water St., Canton, N.Y.,U,S.A. 



Hi 



RECREATION. 



—-•' ■■ 



ON 

TRIAL 

FREE 



Shakespeare 

Reels anil Baits* 

Wm. Shakespeare, Jr., of Kalamazoo, Mich., "maker 
ot fine reels and baits that catch fish," wants every 
dealer in the U. S. and Canada to have a personal 
knowledge of the fine points of the Shakespeare 
reels and the marvelous attractiveness of the 
Shakespeare Baits. He will gladly send samples of 
his reeis and baits for examination, express pre- 
paid, to any reliable sporting goods dealer, or dealer 
who handles a line of fishing tackle, upon receipt 
of his name and address. After examination, if he 
does not wish to keep the assortment in stock the 
dealer may return the tackle to Mr. Shakespeare and 
he will pay the return charges. 

Wm. Shakespeare, Jr., devotes all his time and 
ability to making fine reels and bait that catch 
fish. The baits are so successful in attracting and 
catching tho biggest fish and the reels are so beau- 
tiful in design, so exquisitely finished and withal 
so strong and serviceable the angler who is so for- 
tunate as to own one cherishes it as'his dearest and 
most valued possession. 

"Write to-day to Mr. Shakespeare; ask him to send 
you samples of reels and baits together with his 
charming and delightful little books on "How to 
Catch Bass," "The Fine Points About Tackle" and 
"The Art of Bait Casting" all of which are free. 

WM. SHAKESPEARE, JR., 

J238 Shakespeare Bldg., Kalamazoo, Mich. 



■~~lll!~. 



"The Automatic Reel did it.". 

Caught by H. H. Fraser, St. Johns, N. F. 

No slack line — SKj^fi 

little finger instantly releases spring which 
winds the ^line automatically. This con- 
tinual pull ^©^ prevents fish from dislodg- 
ing hook from^®^. his mouth. When 
once hooked, he': 
your fish. Reel can' 
be made free-running 
for casting. I 

Prizes 

For particulars ask 
any sporting goods " Little 
dealer, or send di- ™« e J 
rect, for "Booklet X. " j| , »\ 

Yawman 4 Erbe Mfg. Co., 

ROCHESTER. N. Y. 



Sms&ll Profits — Quick Sales. 



TROUT 
FLIES 

for trial — send us 




lScfes^aS^af- Quality A Flies 
30c t^EEgssfc** Quality B Flies 
60c %££%££!%&!!"• Quality C Flies 

Z (\r» for an assorted dozen, Dacc CIiap 



Regular price 84 cents. 



asG 



333 



55?! 



**'. 'in 1 — 



SPLIT BAMBOO RODS 

TO cts. 

3 piece and extra tip, cork grip, in wood form 



Fly Rods 

10 feet, 6 ounces 



ist,±± Rods 

9 feet, 8 ounces 



t^ our new Braided silk Enameled Waterproof 
METAL CENTER LINE 

Size No. 5, 4% cents per yard. Size No. 4, 5% cents per 
yard. Put up in 10-yard lengths connected. 



$200 Tvttlc Launches Arc the Winners 

15 MILES IN TWO HOURS. LAUNCH ON EXHIBITION IN STORE 

Catalogues of any of above goods, free on application 

The H. H. KIFFE CO.. 523 Broadway, New York City 

Mention Ricuatiom. 



RECREATION. 



liii 





15he 

BRISTOL 



SEND FOR OUR BRAND-NEW 1902 CATALOGUE. 
We show various styles of our splendid BRISTOL steel 
FISHING RODS, and special accessories of our manu- 
facture. By the way, have you a BRISTOL rod in 
your kit ? No ? Then you are not in it, for the BRIS- 
TOL is the accepted rod nowadays, among fishermen, 
and is so good a rod that it would be perfectly safe to 
start for the woods WITH ONE BRISTOL. You 
wouldn't dare to do that with any other rod, would you ? 
Send for our Catalogue, and look the ground over. If 
the thing looks plausible, order a BRISTOL, and when 
it arrives, take a good look at it ; try its hang ; notice its 
stiffness; get on to its general character. If you don't 
think you've got your full money's worth, send it back. 
In ordering free catalogue, please ask for No. 21. 

THE HOR.TON MFG. CO. 

BRISTOL, CONN. 



Mention Recreation. 



ffiniT— ~ — ■ 1 r ■ iti. ii_ in — 

^~i>-^tir- ' ' <£l ' JET" 1 '_' »"' ' "■* r ' ' ' J I mm_ " 



liv 



RECREATION. 




THE pleasures of your vacation, whether spent in the woods, the mountains or at the 
shore, will not be complete unless your outfit contains a gun for hunting or a revolver 
for target practice. If you would have the best, ask your dealer for the " JJ. & R» ,J and 

refuse substitutes. Catalog for postal. 

HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO., Dept. R, WORCESTER, MASS. 




THE 



902 Model 



LEATHER -COVEREP Pneu- 
matic BLeqoil Pad is now per- 
fect. No pump, no valve, no 
recoil, no flinch, no headache, 
no bruised shoulders, no 
money if not satisfactory and 
returned at once. PRICE $2. 

J. R. WINTERS 
Clinton, Mo. 



IF YOU WOULD LIVE NEXT TO NA- 
TURE, READ RECREATION. 



Free: For i year's subscription of Rec- 
reation, through me, will give I Bromide 
enlargement, any size up to 11x14 inches 
inclusive, from any negative not larger than 
4x5 ; or from photographs. Negatives and 
Photos to be returned to the owner. Here 
is a rare chance to get a large Photo from 
your pet Negative, also Recreation for $1, 
A. F. Evarts, Meriden, Conn. 

Huron Indian Work: To any one sub- 
scribing to Recreation through me I will 
give a Bracelet and Ring worked in horse- 
hair, with any small inscription you like, 
your name, etc. , woven in it with caribou, 
hair; quite a curiosity, Send a}ong yo,i;r $j, 
Walter Legare, 518^ John. Streeti Quebec, 
Canada. 



. ^JX.UM, .jL,il.J 1 1 ., .. II U P J 



Here's a Bullet that ^ ill not injure your gun, 

LUBRICATED WIRE PATCHED BULLETS, 

Just the thing you have been looking for for years. 

■^events Fouling, leading and deposit of metal in the grooves of the. 
rifling. 

Cleans and Lubricates the barrel with every sho.t, making swabbing 
entirely unnecessary. 

Are Perfectly Adapted to any style of gun, slow or rapid tw|s^, Black 
or Smokeless Powder, and are more uniformly accurate in shooting than 
any other form of missije known. 

Perfectly fill all the Grooves of the rifling, and are thus backed by 
the full charge of gas generated by the powder explosion. 

There being less Friction, the velocity is greatly increased and the 
trajectory is flatter than with any other bullet ever made. 

Sample bullets mailed to any address ori 

Qlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllh^^^fev receipt of postage. ' Catalogues Free'. 
' P" ^^ AGENTS WANTED. 

1 1 1 I M^ J8 ® = Send $1. for sample box of Bullets 
lllllllllllllllllll """ lllll l Pg ^ or Cartridges by Prepaid Express. 




National Projectile Works, GRA ™ « m 



RECREATION. 



IV 



Newhouse Traps 




THE STANDARD 



OVER FIFTY YEARS 



Used by all professional hunters and trappers, 
who find that 

The Best Trap is the Cheapest 

Complete illustrated catalogue on 
application. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, LTD., Kenwood, N. Y. 



Practical Common Sense 
in 6 Sizes. 




CAMP 
STOVE 



Either with or 
without oven. The 
lightest, strongest, 
most compact, prac- 
tical stove made. 
Cast combination 
sheet steel top, 
smooth outside, 
heavy lining in fire 
box and around oven, holds its shape, telescopic pipe 
carried inside the stove. Burns larger wood and keeps 
fire longer than any other. Used by over 9,000 campers 
andonly one stove returned. 

For catalogue giving lull particulars, mention Rkc- 
reatiox and address, 

D. W. CREE, Manufacturer, Griggsville, III. 



rppr To anyone subscribing to Recreation 
' I'LL, through me I will give a cloth copy of 
one of Cooper's, Dickens', Dumas', Thackeray's or 
Conan Doyle's books. Address, 

J. M. RUGEN, 210S West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 




Tennis Rackets 
and Golf Clubs 



ARE 



Carefully Selected Perfectly Balanced 
Finely Finished Up-to-Date in Model 



A Trial will Convince 
Tou of These Qualities 

Complete Lines of TENNIS a?id GOLF Supplies 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 



THE BRIDGEPORT GUN 
IMPLEMENT COMPANY 

313 — 317 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



THE PERFECTED "MALCOLM" TELESCOPIC SIGHT 



1857-1002 

NEW COMPANY 





OUR "ROUGH RIDER" HUNTING SCOPE, $9.00. 

The Best and Cheapest on the market. New Catalogue just out. 

Write T5he Malcolm Rifle Telescope Mfg. Co., Syracuse, N. Y., U. S. A. 



"HI-HIT 



) J Protects you from annoying 
Flies, Punfcies, &c, while 
Fishing and Hunting. 
Sold by Sporting Goods Dealers or mail 25c. 

E. W. Masten, Mention Recreation. Albany, N. Y. 



FISHING .—Black Bass and Salmon 

Illustrated Guide with Maps of the 
RIDEAU, BEVERLEY & CHARLESTON LAKES, free 

Apply to E. A. GEIGER, Sup't 
Brockville,Westport & S. Ste. M. Ry., Brockville, Ont. 



IDEAL g PAPER SHOT SHELL TRIMMER 

SOMETHING NEW. 

With it you can cut off the soft and 
frayed ends of shells that have been 
fired and they will be as good as 
new. Why throw good shells 
away ? Send us 6 cents in stamps for 
latest IDEAL HAND BOOK, 
giving full information of all New 
Goods and much matter of interest 
to shooters. Address, 

IDEAL MANUF'G CO., New Haven, Conn.,11. S. A. 

Phil, B, Befceart Co., of San Francisco, Cal., Agents for Pacific Coast 
When you write please Mention Recreation. 




The 



M 



RECREATION. 




"HOPKINS & ALLEN" 

New Line Small Calibre Rifles 




No. 822. — Lever Action, case hardened, walnut stock, rubber butt plate, weight 

4 pounds, 20-inch barrel, for 22 R. F. long or short cartridges. $4.50 




No. 722. — Solid Breech Block Action, case hardened, walnut stock, rubber butt plate, 

weight 2> l A pounds, 18 inch barrel, for 22 short R. F. cartridges, $3.50 

We will ship, all charges prepaid, on receipt of remittance with order, to any 
express office in the U. S. A. We agree to refund your money if you are not 
satisfied, provided you will agree to mail us a target made with the rifle we 
send you. Order while this offer is open. 

The Hopkins & Allen Arms Co. 

NORWICH, CONN., U. S. A. 



RECREATION. 



lvii 



The Syracuse 
Hammerless Shot Cun 




No. 3 Grade, List Price, 



$45.00 



With Patented Automatic Ejector, $55.00 



We manufacture nine distinct grades of Hammerless 
Shot Guns, listing in price from $30.00 each to $475.00 
each. We furnish our patented automatic ejector on all 
of the different grades, and we also supply, when desired, 
our new device which will instantly change dfl 

ejector to a non-ejector gun; something never 

before supplied on a double-barrel, hammerless gun. 
Write direct for catalogue and full information. 

SYRACUSE ARMS COMPANY, 

SYRACUSE, N. Y., 
U. S. A. 



Catalogue free upon application. 



Mention Recreation. 



Hvm 



RECREATION. 



STILL ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

Send me 40 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION and I will send you a 



Afn \ Hlffllllp RjlTP 
..lu 1 JJull Jib JJQ11 u 




IL 





Hade by the Ithaca Gun Co. 
ind Listed at $30 

I have contracted for 20 of these 
guns at a price which enables me to 
offer them as above, and they will 
doubtless all be taken within the next 
3 months. 

If You Want One Get Busy at Once 

Sample copies of RECREATION for 
use in canvassing furnished on application 



RECREATION, 23 West 24th St., New York 



RECREATION. 



lix 



CHARLES DALY 



3 BARREL HAHriER GUN 



12 Qauge 28 Inch.— 38=55 or 30-30 Rifle Cartridge 

Price, $90.00 

HAfinERLESS 3 BARREL GUNS, $ l50 ^ $2 00 

SEND FOR OUR SPECIALTY CATALOGUE 

SCHOVERLING,DALY& GALES, 302& 304 Broadway, New York 



AT THE GRAND AMERICAN HANDICAP OF 1902 

Du Pont Smokeless 

WON 

MORE MONEY 

Than all the OTHER POWDERS combined. 
The most popular powder on the grounds. 



E. I. DUPONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

WILMINGTON, DEL. 



lx 



RECREATION. 




8902 GRAND PRIX 

and 800 Pounds Sterling 
Won at Monte Carlo by a 



*J 



SCOTT GUN 

Also same prize won in 1887 and '93. 
Also Triennial Championship in '92 and '95. 



t 



flgpSend Stamps for Catalogue of these 
noted Guns. A large assortment now in 
stock all grades. Also, all other makes: — 
Lang — Westley Richards — Clabrough — Par- 
ker — Lef ever — Smith — Ithaca — Remington 
— Baltimore Arms — Worcester, &c, &c. 

Other guns taken in trade. 



SPORTSMEN'S OUTFITS, 
CAMP SUPPLIES, 
RIFLES, &C. 

Send 6 cents for finely illustrated Catalogue of Highest Quality Fishing Rods and Tackle. 

WM. READ & SONS, 



t 



ESTABLISHED 1826. 

107 Washington St., - - - - 



BOSTON. 



'« 



POOLER'S BOSS SHOT, CARTRIDGE BELT 
AND GAME CARRIER 

The best of all. Delivered by mail to any 
address on receipt of $2. Send 10 cents 
in silver or stamps for Sample Cart- 
ridge Holder. 




R.. H. POOLER, Ma^nufactvirer 
SERENA, ILL. 



Sent Free: Ten varieties of Mexican post- 
age and revenue stamps for one annual 
subscription to Recreation sent in through 
me. Stamp collectors should not miss this 
chance to increase their collection of Mexi- 
can stamps. Albert M. Penn, Laredo, Tex. 



Another Great Chance 

I HAVE ON HAND 

A WILKESBARRE GUN 

($125 Grade, Entirely New) 

FINE DAMASCUS BARRELS 

that I will give to anyone who will send me 75 
yearly subscriptions to Recreation. 

I have only one of these guns, and so the first 
man who sends me the $75 will get it. Others 
who may try for the gun and be too late can get 
for their clubs a Syracuse, Ithaca, Parker or 
Remington gun, of as high grade as I can afford 
to furnish. 

Eggs Free: To all who send me 3 yearly 
subscriptions to Recreation, at $1 eacb, 1 
will send one sitting of barred Plymouth 
rock eggs. America's best strains. Chas. 
Knisely, Prairie Depot. Ohio. 




m 



Accuracy, Durability, Safety, Quick Action, Beauty 
of Finish, Price Low. All combined and guaranteed 



in the 



QUACKENBUSH SAFETY RIFLE, 22 caliber. 



Send for our illustrated price catalogue "A," showing our full line of 22-100 caliber 
Rifles, Air Guns, etc. Do not buy a 22-100 caliber Rifle without first examining a 
(Juackenbush Safety. We send them on trial. If your dealer does not keep them we will 
prepay Express charges on receipt of catalogue price. 

manufactured by H. M. QUACKENBUSH, HERKIMER, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



lxi 



The "OLD 
RELIABLE 

Han Stood the test 
of Over 35 Years 




PARKER CUN 

Made on Honor. Has No Equal ! 

la noted for its simplicity of construction 
beauty of proportion, excellence of work- 
manship, faultless balance and HARD 
SHOOTING QUALITIES. 



Experience and ability have 
placed the Parker Gun in an envi- 
able and well deserved position as the 
Rest Gun in the world. Made by the oldest 
shotgun manufacturers in America. Over 109,000 
of these guns in use. Send/or Catalogue 



Mention Recreation. 




PARKER BROS., MERIDEN, CONN 

New York Salesroom, No. 32 Warren St. 

GEEAT WESTERN- G-UIN WORKS 

JSk , i ~^- 




RIFLES, REVOLVERS pat.apf 
SHOT GUNS 
AnriUNITION 

SPORTSriEN'S GOODS ^H«pr Large Assortment of 

Flint Lock Guns, Muskets, Carbines, Pistols==Army and Sporting 

Also, Rifles, Carbines, Revolvers, Swords, Sabres, &c, of Mexican, Civil and Spanish "War Models, 

and a Great Variety of New, Second-hand and Shop-worn Guns of Mcdern Styles and at very low prices. Send stamp for catalogue. 

5S5 , GREAT WESTERN GUN WORKS, 529 Smithfield Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 
THE ORIGINAL MODERN RIFLE TELESCOPE. 



We announce that our perfected SNAPSHOT telescope, which is 
the innocent cause of the present "Revolution » in rifle teleWopes 

High Grade Target Telescopes and Mountings hold the record for 
finest targets and the smallest [group on record at 200 yards 
A great variety of telescopes at from $10 00 upward 

DEALERS CAN CARRY THESE TELESCOPES IN STOCK Have 
always made them so. While othei firms that boast of their antiquity were still advocating the 
impractical long narrow kind, we were making SNAPSHOT telescopes with shorter tube, low 
p °rpT er u la . rg ? s t fle1 ?, and practically universal focus, and selling them. too. 

rne evolution of this telescope is the cause of the "Revolution " we now hear of. 

Send for our List and Sheet on mounting up the telescope, adjustments of the same, etc. 

JOHN W. SIDLE, 628 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pa, 
Mention Recreation. 



<~> ZT. 

2 o 

i-i- [/) 




bdi 



RECREATION. 



Ell 




N° 4 

$IOO LIST 

ITHACA 




Showing the DOUBLE THICK BREECH with 
NEW CROS8 BOLT 

GUARANTEED to be worth $25.00 

more thai any other make 

of Gun at Same Cost 

ITHAGA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 



fill j; 

..i 1 '/.as' 1 1 !li 



%r ■'■■ 

m 





U. M. C. 

SMOKELESS .22 CARTRIDGES 




Will be used throughout the country during vacation 
days. They are the greatest luxury which has ever 
come to marksmen — no smoke — little noise — no fouling 
— exceeding accuracy. 

The .22 Short Smokeless has gained a reputation 
for itself and the C. B. Cap Smokeless, now for the 
first time put out, is well lubricated and has no glass 
to cut the bore of the gun. 



JVetv Catalogues 



The Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 



313 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 



Bridgeport 
Conn, 



86 First Street 

San Francisco, Cal« 



Remington-Lee Sporting Rifle 




WITHOUT AN EQUAL FOR 

Long Range Target and Big Game Shooting 

Frank H. Hyde shot with a Remington-Lee Sporting Rifle 

and won the All-Comers Match 

Sea Girt, New Jersey, September 10th, J 90 1 

List Price, $25.00 

Apply to your dealer for Catalog and discount. 

REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY 

ILION, N. Y. 

313-3*7 Broadway, Naw York City 425 Market St., San Francisco, California 

Mention Recreation 



CHARLES FRANCIS PRESS NEW YORK. 



HEM 



REPEATING SHOTGUNS 

If you want a serviceable shotgun, 
one that a scratch or a bump wcn't 
ruin and that can be bought at a price 
that won't ruin you, the Winchester 
Repeating Shotgun will meet your re- 
quirements. A 12 or 16 gauge Win- 
chester Take-Down, with a strong 
shooting, full-choke barrel, suitable for 
trap work, duck shooting, etc., and an 
extra interchangeable modified-choke 
or cylinder-bore barrel, complete, for 
field shooting, lists at only $42.00. 
Your dealer will sell it to you for less. 
This is a bargain in a gun, but not a 
bargain-counter gun. Sold everywhere. 

FREE:— 164 Paee Illustrated Catalogue 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO. 

NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

• ••••• 



§ 



Slaves to the Coffee Bean 

If coffee tampers 
with your heart or 
nerves, suppose 
you break away for 

10 days and see 
how much better 

you feel. 

You can make 

the job easy and 

pleasant if you take 

on POSTUM COFFEE. 

Be sure and have it 
well boiled to bring out 
flavor and Food value. 



SPRATTS PATENT 

DOG SOAP 




Is of the greatest value to dog owners, as it is entirely 
FREE FROn POISON, and at the same time most 
effective in the destruction of lice and fleas. More- 
over, it keeps the skin free from scurf, prevents 
Mange and other skin diseases. No other soap 
should ever be used in preparing dogs for exhibition ; 
it leaves the coat smooth and glossy. 

Spratts Patent Dog Soap contains no carbolic acid 
or coal tar, but is nicely perfumed and produces a fine 
lather. Recommended by kennel owners throughout 
the world. Once tried, always used. 

Price 20 cents per Tablet, by Mail. 

Write for our Catalogue " Dog Culture '' with prac- 
tical chapters on the feeding, kenneling and manage 
ment of dogs, post free. 

We also manufacture a specially prepared food tor 
dogs, puppies, rabbits, cats, poultry, game, pigeons, 
fish, birds, etc. 

Spratts Patent (America) Limited, 

450 IIARKET ST., NEWARK, N. J. 

BRANCHES : 
1324 Valencia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
7 J 4 South 4th Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

NOTE.— If you are interested in Chickens, write for 
"POULTRY CULTURE," sent free if you mention 
Recreation. 



vose 



e xi you menuor 



PIAN05 



have been established over SO YEARS. By ours) 
tern of payments every family in moderate circ 
stances can own a VOSE piano. We take old in 

ments in exchange and deliver the ntw piano in your home free of expeM 

Write for catalogue D and explanations 

VOSE & SONS PIANO CO., 60 Boylston St., Boston, Ma* 



VOLUME XVII. 
JUflBER 3 



SEPTEMBER, 1902 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




Hintain Sheen in Idaho* ACa P itai stof y <>f Hunting in the 

F M1 IucllI ^> Rockies, by GEO. F. WRIGHT, 



m 



VOLUME XVII. 
NUnBER 3 



SEPTEMBER, 1902 



$1.00 A YEAR 
10c. A COPY 




fountain Sheen in Idaho* ACapitalstoryofHuntlngint,,e 

11 ^"^WfJ III lUdlJU, Rockies, by GEO. F. WRIGHT* 



If I Could Meet You 

Face to Face 

and explain tuhy the Swoboda System is different and better than any 
other and infinitely superior to drugs and medicines I know you would be 
convinced, and being convinced that I can turn lassitude into energy ; 
feebleness into strength ; ill health into robust health ; mental sluggishness 
into activity, and insomnia into sound healthful sleep, by my system, you 
would place yourself under my direction. To sim- 
mer the matter down to its lowest terms I haven't 
a doubt but thousands of intelligent men and 
women who really need my help to restore normal 
conditions have read my advertisements time and 
again and would have long ago adopted my system 
hadihey belie-Oed lhat tvhai I claim is true. 

If you have any doubt on the subject, I want you 
to write me saying so and I'll send you a long list of 
names and addresses of men and women who have 
been restored to perfect manhood and womanhood 
by the use of my system ; people who are above the 
breath of suspicion — clergymen, professional men 
and women, and honorable business men. More 
than this, I will send you the postage to write to as 
many of these people as you care to, and postage to 
enclose for a reply. 

Don't take my word — I'm prejudiced. 

I know and I want you to know that my system, 
if followed faithfully, first relieves the human organ- 
ism of poison and impurities by producing healthy 
digestion and assimilation, and relieving constipa- 
tion, and after that revitalizes the exhausted nerves, 
sends rich, red blood coursing and tingling to every 
capillary and extremity, puts good sound muscle 
where muscle is needed, removes fat, gives erectness 
of carriage and springiness and grace to the walk — 
stimulates and builds up the tired brain, paints the 
cheek with the flush of robust health ; builds up 
undeveloped parts, and in fact fits man, woman or 
child to Nature's perfect mold. I can do all this for 
you, as I have for hundreds of others, because my 
system is based on Nature's laws — the results are as 
natural and inevitable as the cycle of the planets. 

Mr. C. O. Prouse, a leading attorney of Hopkins- 
ville, Ky., writes under date of Oct. 5, 1901 : 

" Allow me to thank you for your kindness for the 
past two months and for your instructions, which 
have been to me one of the richest blessings that I 
have ever received. At the time of beginning your 
exercises I was simply a nervous wreck — was con- 
stipated and suffered intensely with indigestion ; 
was easily overtaxed when attempting work of any 
kind, and seemed almost impossible to recuperate 
without leaving off for months all mental and physi- 
cal labor, but, thanks to you, I was enabled, without 
medicine of any description (something I had not 
done for over two years), to keep up my work and 
at the same time increase my weight and general 
health until now — only two months — I feel like a 
new man ; am now healthy, strong and tireless. 
Now I do not know how to be tired, as the exercise 
you give seems to rest me instead of tiring — it acts 
like a stimulant to a tired body. 

' ' It does me a great deal of good to say that I 
have forgotten the taste of ' pepsin ' and such other 





medicines for a weak stomach or digestive organs, 
and that / eat anything I want. I can heartily 
recommend your system of exercise to any one that 
desires a good physical condition — a condition that 
when the mind is tired and needs the night's rest, 
restful sleep will be his reward. 

"I will take pleasure in answering any correspond- 
ence that will in any wise help you along the road 
to success and some unfortunate to the road of 
health." 

I have no book, no chart, no apparatus whatever. 
My system is for each individual ; my instructions 
for you would be just as personal as if you were my 
only pupil. It is taught by mail only and with per- 
fect success, requires but a few minutes' time in 
your own room just before retiring and it is the 
only one which does not overtax the heart. I shall 
be pleased to send you free valuable information 
and detailed outline of my system, its principles and 
effects, together with testimonial letters from pupils. 

ALOIS P. SWOBODA. 

522 Unity, Chicago. 



RECREATION 

Copyright, December, 1901, by G. O. Shields 
A Monthly Magazine Devoted to Everything the Name Implies 



$1.00 A Year. 

10 Cents a Copy. 



G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), 
Editor and Manager. 



23 West 24TH Street, 

New York 



CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER 

PAGE 

One Went under the Table and the Other over It Frontispiece 

Mountain Sheep in Idaho. Illustrated Geo. F. Wright 167 

"Where the Wild Duck Quacks. Poem Geo.McAdam 169 

A Moose Quartette and a Solo. Illustrated J.R.King 171 

Plateau Wildcat. Illustrated Allan Brooks 174 

A Moose Hunt in Northern Maine .A. Hedges 175 

The Monarch's Battle Cry. Poem R.T.L. 176 

An Adirondack Laker H. R. Barnard 177 

A Tiny Tragedy. Illustrated L. C. Remsen 179 

The Sick Man's Request. Poem A. L. Vermilya 180 

Some Hunting Days Howard Carl 181 

Adirondack Guides Thomas G. King 183 

Salmon Fishing on Charleston Lake E. A. Geiger 185 

A Bear and a Bath W. H.Wright 187 

To a Migratory Fowl. Poem A.D'.Nichols 188 

Hunting Quails and Finding Coons E. M. Dorsey 189 

Hunting Wolves in Eastern Nebraska Arthur L. Anderson 191 

The Old Drummin' Log:. Poem Brad L. Hubert 192 

Muskrat Trapping J. A. Newton 193 

The Wild Goose Chase. Poem Rev. F. C. Cowper 195 

Mr. Lacey's Speech on the Game Preserve Bill 197 

Autumn Joys. Poem Arthur Hazleton 198 



From the Game Fields 199 

Fish and Fishing 20; 

Guns and Ammunition — 211 

Natural History 217 

The League of American Sportsmen 223 



Forestry 228 

Pure and Impure Foods 230 

Book Notices 232 

Publisher's Notices 233 

Editor's Corner 236 

Amateur Photography 241 



Entered as Second-Class Matter at New York Post-Office, Oct. 17, 1894. 




Never 
Requires Grinding 
Will shave for years 
without honing 



Ful! Hollow Ground 
Two in Morocco Case 
Four in Morocco Case 



each, $2.50 
c . . 6.00 
. . 12.00 

Hamburg ground, making them adaptable for wiry or 
soft beards. Sold by leading dealers, or from the 
manufacturer, postpaid. Our booklet "Hints to 
Shavers" with Catalogue of Razor Sets, Free. 

Address firm of 

A. L. SILBERSTEIN 

458 Broadway, New York 



Skin Diseases 

If you suffer from Eczema, Salt Rheum, 
Ringworm, Itch, Ivy Poison, Acne, or 
other skin troubles, 

Hydrozone 

will cure you. 

Cures sunburn in 24 hours. In cases of 
Prickly Heat and Hives it will stop itching 
at once, also will relieve mosquito bites. 

Hydrozone is a scientific Germicide. Used 
and endorsed by leading physicians. It is 
absolutely harmless, yet most powerful 
healing agent. 

As these diseases are caused by parasites, 
killing them without causing injury to the 
sufferer, naturally cures the trouble. 
Sold by leading druggists. 

iTDirir to any one sending me 10c. to cover actual 
* ■M-*E* postage, will send a bottle containing suf- 
ficient to prove to your entire satisfaction the claims 
here made. Pamphlet sent free. Address 



Qill Lfofefcsfc 



{Dspt. F-59) Prinoe Street, 



Mew York, 



11 



RECREATION. 



Your Vacation Should 
Benefit Mind and Body 

IT WILL do both if you take our advice, and go as far away 
from the haunts of men as your limit of time will permit. 
Either explore some of the millions of square miles of territory 
in the United States or Canada where white man has never trod; 
take a canoe trip through some of our forest highways or pitch your 
tent on the bank of a babbling brook. 




Equipped for a thousand-mile trip into the Canadian wilderness. 

We can make all your arrangements and furnish 
everything- you need 

MANUFACTURERS OF 



Tents 

Sleeping - Bags 
Clothing 
Aluminum 
Cooking Outfits 
Pack Harness 
Tump Lines 



Clothing Bags 
Provision Bags 
Canvas Folding 

Buckets 
Wash Basins 
Stoves 
Bakers 



Moccasins 
Aluminum Lanterns 
Pneumatic Beds 
Pneumatic Cushions 
Camp Furniture 
Etc., Etc. 



We GUARANTEE everything we make. 
Write for Catalogue " R " 

ABERCROMBIE & FITCH 

2 SOUTH STREET, NEW YORK 



RECREATION. 



in 



Things 

Sportsmen 
Want 






iHIS border illustra 
some of our special 
for sportsmen. W 
several other new special- 
ties just hot from the 

finishing room, which are in the 

Catalog "A" just ready for distribution, 

and fully described. Mailed 

free to* any address on 

receipt of request. 



Marble 
Safety Axe 
Company, 








5i5jS> 




iv RECREATION. 



WRENN 



Combustion Governor Company 

229 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Capital Stock, $150,000 

1500 Shares of $100 Each. Full Paid and Non-Assessable. 

BONDS 

Amount of Issue, $50,000. 
DATED HAY 1, 1902. DUE HAY 1, 1922. 

These Bonds bear interest at 6%, payable November 1 and May 1. Secured by a 
Deed of Trust to the Morton Trust Company, New York City, covering all the property 
and franchises of the Wrenn Combustion Governor Company, interest payable at the 
National Park Bank of New York. A sinking fund has been provided for in the Deed of 
Trust for the redemption of the bonds. Proceeds of bonds to be devoted to developing 
the business of the Company. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 

President, B. W. WRENN, Passenger Traffic Manager, Plant System, Savannah, Ga. 

Vice-Pres. and Gen. Mngr., H. B. P. WRENN, Electrical Engineer, 229 Broadway, 
New York. 
Second Vice-Pres. WILLIAM P. CLOTWORTHY, President Clotworthy Chemical 
Co., Baltimore, Md. 
Sec'y and Treas., JAMES J. FARNSWORTH, General Eastern Agent, Plant 
System, New York. 
JOHN H. TSCHUDI, President American Electrical Supply Co., Baltimore, Md. 
SAMUEL A. HOUSE, Bradstreet Commercial Agency, Baltimore, Md. 

ARCHIBALD B. DALBY, Manager Sterling Electrical Manufacturing Co., New 
York. 
RALSTON FLEMMING, Lawyer, 220 Broadway, New York City. 

WM. S. REIMS, Purchasing Agent, Central Foundry Co., New York. 

ATTORNEYS. 

FLEMMING AND FLEMMING, 220 Broadway, New York. 

The directors of the Wrenn Combustion Governor Company, after a thorough and 
careful test of a mechanical device known as the " Combustion Governor,'' became con- 
vinced of its great commercial value, and secured patents in the United States, Canada, 
England, France, Germany, Italy, Mexico, Belgium, Hungary, Sweden, Austria, Vic- 
toria, Queensland, and New South Wales. 

The vast number of boilers in use offers an unlimited field for the Company's goods. 
The low cost of manufacture and the price at which the device is sold is sufficient to give 
the company a handsome profit, and a conservative estimate indicates that the company 
will be in a position to declare a satisfactory dividend on the capital stock during the 
first year. 

The company offers to sell a limited number of its 6% Gold Bonds, of $100 each, at 
Ninety Dollars, together with a bonus of one share of stock of the par value of $100. 

Subscriptions should be sent to the Wrenn Combustion Governor Company, 229 
Broadway, New York City. 

Circulars containing full information can be obtained at our New York office. 

This machine saves 10 to 30 per cent, of coal now consumed by boilers. 



RECREATION. 




Twentieth Century 

Electro=Vapor 

Launches 

ARE ideal gentlemen's launches, free from complications and care, and should appeal 
to the angler, the hunter, and every lover of nature, as they are designed with a 
view of supplying more genuine, healthful pleasure to the square inch than any- 
thing we know of. They are elegant to look at — a pleasure to ride in — easy to manage — 
safe and reliable. There is no heat, no smoke, no fire, no engineer or pilot, no govern- 
ment license required, no offensive odor, no noisy exhaust ; under way in ten seconds. 
The most simple, economical, powerful and effective outfit ever offered. There are three 
thousand of these launches in use, and we ship them to all parts of the globe. They 
were used exclusively at the Pan-American and Omaha Expositions, where they carried 
thousands of delighted people. Why ? Because they were the best. A launch as shown 
above is 16 ft. long, and can be operated in 8 inches of water, enabling the angler and 
the hunter to invade the feeding grounds with ease. 

We build a 15 ft. Fishing Launch for $150 
*' •« " 16 «« Family «• " 200 

•■ " ■« 35 •« Cabin " ** 1500 

Also a complete line of Steam and Sail Yachts — Row Boats — Hunting Boats — Canoes. 
Our 80-page catalog tells the truth about the best boats built, and it is yours for the 
asking. Send to-day and avoid the Spring rush. Address 



Racine Boat Mfg. Co. 

Riverside, Racine, Wis. 



VI 



RECREATION. 



STILL ANOTHER GREAT OFFER 

Send me 40 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION and I will send you a 



11116 IT 






Hade by the Ithaca Gun Co. 
ind Listed at $30 



I have contracted for 20 of these 
guns at a price which enables me to 
offer them as above, and they will 
doubtless all be taken within the next 
3 months. 

If You Want One Get Busy at Once 

; 

! Sample copies of RECREATION for 

use in canvassing furnished on application 



RECREATION, 23 West 24th St., New York 



RECREATION. 



VII 



Cb| jngcf $Oll Toot Ball Supplies 

Victor Inter-Collegiate Foot Ball 



FOUR STORES 

67 Cortlandt 
111 Nassau 
25 West42dSt.,N. Y. 

and 

1197 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn 




No. ;8i 



Former difficulties 
of irregularity in 
shape overcome. 
The use of spec- 
iallyimported Eng- 
lish grain leather, 
Jrom which all pos- 
sible stretch has 
been eliminated in 
tanning. The 
leather is later cut 
to perfect model, 

each section being carefully tested to thickness, weight and tension; sewed by nand and 
given severe test as to gauge and measurement, makes this one of the best balls in the 

world — None are better. Price $4.00 

No. 380. Victor Best American grain leather, No. 5, official in weight and size . . . .$3.00 
No. 5 R. B. Fine American grain leather, official in model and weight, our regular 

Academy and High-School ball $2.48 

No. 5 R. G. Fine India grain leather, linen sewed and lined, official in shape and size $1.75 
No. 5 REX. India grain leather, linen sewed and lined, perfect in shape and size.price $ 1 .25 
No. CC. A reliable Rugby ball, full in size with pure gum bladder, price 80c 

ASSOCIATION FOOT BALL 

No. 395. Victor Official Association foot ball. English grain leather, cover made in seven 
sections, so assembled as to secure perfect roundness, without end caps, seams through- 
out are welted, weight 13 to 14^ oz., size 27 inches with inflator and needle. Price. .$4.75 
No. 391. Victor best American grain leather, regular No. 5 ball, eight sections, 

perfectly round $3.75 

No. 5 D. American grain leather, eight pieces, capless ends, true in size and shape, 
standard bladder. Price $ 1 .50 

VICTOR SHOULDER, KNEE AND ELBOW ARJIOR PADS 

The most important recent gridiron additions — In these pads we have something 
which a team or player anxious to win at foot ball cannot afford to overlook. They offer 
complete immunity from injury to three most vulnerable portions of a player's body, 
viz: the shoulder, knee and elbow. Players equipped with these pids are not only im- 
pervious to injury, but also play with additional dash and confidence which are always 
characteristics of successful foot ball. The armor consists of a section of the very heav- 
iest oak-tanned leather, saturated and pressed into the required shape on metal dies. It 
is then carefully dried, bound and padded with heavy felt. It fits perfectly and does 
not hamper the action or movements in the least. Worn under the outer garments. 
Single pad, frr either shoulder, Knee Pads, each $1. 50 

with attachment $2 50 Elbow pad, each $1.00 

Double pads, for both shoulders, Shoulder and collar bone set (double) $5 00 

with attachment $4 . 00 Any pad sent prepaid for ioc each additional 

FOOT BALL CLOTHING 

Our Varsity Foot Ball Pants are made of best imported drab moleskin. All points 
subjected to unusual strain, strongly reinforced and seams throughout carefully double 
sewed. Thes? are also made with cane thighs, nine strips of cane on either hip 
or thigh. Price $2.75 

League Moleskin Pants made of American moleskin, 
heavy quilted thighs, extra heavy hip and knee. Price $1 .25 

High School Pants made of substantial canvas, heavy 
hip, knee and thigh padding. Price 75c 

BLACK VARSITY FOOT BALL SHOES 

Only the best black calf used in these shoes; they are hand 
made, box toes, re-inforced in all parts subject to greatest 
strain; eleven Princeton cleets used on these shoes, 8 on 
sole and 3 en heel. Price $3.00 

Nose Masks, Foot Ball Hose, Foot Ball Jerseys, Head Guards and Shin 
Guards in all styles and prices. SEND FOR CATALOGUE 




f»t*jtj Artum fob. 



RobJ. R. Tngersoll $ Bros. 



Department 

77 



67 Cortlandt Street, New York 




'VARSITY PADDED- 



V1U 



RECREATION. 




With a 



Kenwood Sleeping Bag 

you do not need a tent; you are pre- 
pared for any weather, hot or cold, 
wet or dry. It is a light, compact, 
warm covering that assures comfort 
every night. The construction is 
simple, sanitary and practical. Hun- 
dreds of experienced sportsmen are 
now using Kenwood Bags. 

Write us for prices, samples and 
full information. 

THE KENWOOD MILLS 

DEPARTMENT B, ALBANY, N. Y. 



SaWf/tetf, stivirjfr 



e Sh 



Here's a Conundrum: 

But it's awful easy to guess* 

How does it happen that the Page Woven 
Wire Fence Co. have sold $50,000 worth more 
fencing in the first five months of 1902 than they 
sold in the years of 1890-1-2-3 and 4 altogether ? 

Second. Would it be possible for any com- 
pany to so marvelously increase their sales, year 
after year, unless their product was all they 
claim for it? 

Seven hundred thousand farmers are now using 
Page Fence, and the farmers are the most con- 
siderate and practical people we know. 

Page Woven Wire Fence Co. 



Box 39. 



ADRIAN, MICHIGAN. 



e^^^^^^^43^4 3 ##4 3 ##4 s #####4 d 4'4 3 ##4 a ^# , ^4 5 ^*l'#*l* 



RECREATION. 



IX 





NOVEMBER FIRST 

DAILY FIRST CLASS LIMITED TRAINS 
BETWEEN 



tt 



CHICAGO AND LOS ANGELES 



a 



San Francisco, and the principal California tourist points will be placed 

in service by the 

ROCK ISLAND SYSTEM 

AND 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

These trains will be exclusively first-class. No other line will make 
quicker time to California. Lowest grades. No high altitudes. 

Direct route via 

THE EL PASO SHORT LINE 

Finest and newest trans-continental trains. Entire equipment will be of 
the highest type ; Compartment and Drawing Room Sleepers, Dining, 
Observation, and Buffet-Library Cars, with Barber and Bath ; Electric 
Lighted. Reservations can be made now ; apply to 

JOHN SEBASTIAN, Passenger Traffic Manager, Rock Island System, Chicago. 



* 



m 



f 



I .^c M V\ 



^ 



RECREATION. 



A Feature of the 
Great Lakes 

Among many desirable features afforded travelers over the Lake Shore & 
Michigan Southern Railway is the 300 miles of ride along the picturesque south 
shore of Lake Erie, through the rich and historic Western Reserve country. 

The crossing of the famous Bay Bridge (nearly a mile in length) over Sandusky 
Bay is in itself a source of greatest delight to the passenger, presenting a marine view of 
unparalleled beauty. 

Experienced travelers use the Lake Shore exclusively between Chicago, Toledo, Cleveland, 
Buffalo, New York, and Boston, not alone for its pleasantness of route, but because of the 
comfort and punctuality of the service. 

Send your address for copy of " Book of Trains " to 

A. J. Smith, g. p. & t. a., Cleveland, O. 





■®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®(i 



Southerrv R^ailw^y 

ANNOUNCES ITS ENTRANCE AS AN INITIAL LINE INTO 

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.= 



Effective July 1. 1902 

By an arrangement for trackage rights over the line formerly known as the Plant System, as between 
Savannah, Ga., and Jacksonville, Fla., and Jesup, Ga., and Jacksonville, Fla., the Southern Railway will 
be extended from Savannah and Jesup, respectively, to Jacksonville, Fla., and will on and after that date 
operate its own train service into and out of Jacksonville thereby. 

On and after above mentioned date the high class Through Trains of the Southern 
Railway from the East, the North, the West, and the South-west will be operated into 
Jacksonville via Jesup and the New Short Line, which reduces the distance from 
Savannah and from Jesup to Jacksonville 20 miles* 

THE SOUTHERN RAILWAY'S GATEWAY TO FLORIDA 



Washington and Jacksonville 
Norfolk a^nd Jacksonville 
Chattanooga and Jacksonville 
Birmingham and Jacksonville 



Richmond and Jacksonville 
Memphis &nd Jacksonville 
Atla,nta, &nd Jacksonville 
Harriman Junction and Jacksonville 



For Rates, Sleeping Car Reservation, etc., call on or address 

New York Offices : 271 and 1185 BROADWAY 

W. A. TURK, S. H. HARDWICK. ALEX. S. THWEATT, 

Pass. Traffic Manager, Gen. Pass. Agent, East. Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. 1185 Broadway, N. Y. 



RECREATION. 



XI 



■ FOR YOUR. 



Summer Outing 

Allow us to suggest Colorado and Utah, famous the 
world over for their cool and invigorating climate, 
magnificent mountain scenery and picturesque sum- 
mer resorts, which are located along the line of the 

Denver 8c Rio Grande 

and Rio Grande Western 

" The Scenic Line of the World." 

Special low rates are now on sale from all points 
East to Denver, Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Glen- 
wood Springs and Salt Lake City, and in addition to 
this very low excursion rates, side trips and "Circle" 
tour tickets are on sale via this line to the principal 
points of interest, which affords an excellent oppor- 
tunity for an inexpensive outing in the Rocky Moun- 
tains and t~> view some of the magnificent sceneiy. 
The trip to Salt Lake City is one of unsurpassed 
pleasure, and tickets to that point are good either 
via the main line through the Royal Gorge, Lead- 
ville, over Tennessee Pass, through the Canyon of 
the Grand River and Glenwood Springs ; or via the 
line over Marshall Pass and through the Black Can- 
yon of the Gunnison, thus enabling the tourist to 
use one of the above routes going and the other 
returning. Another noted trip is the tour "Around 
the Circle" of 1,000 miles for $28.00, which com- 
prises more noted scenerv than any similar trip in 
the world, passing the following noted points : La 
Veta Pass, Poncha Pass, Toltec Gorge, Indian Reser- 
vations, Durango, Mancos, Dolores Canyon, Rico, 
Lizard Head Pass, Las An'mas Canyon, Silverton, 
Ouray, Cimarron Canyon, Black Canyon, Marshall 
Pass and the Royal Gorge. 

If you contemplate a trip through Colorado or 
Utah, inquire of your nearest ticket agent for rates 
and illustrated descriptive matter, or address S. K. 
HOOPER, G. P. & T. A., Denver, Col. 



SUPERB CLIMATE. 



In Colorado all the conditions of health are 
met. Theie is a sufficient altitude to cause 
lung and chest development ; there is the dry, 
exhilarating mountain air, with an almost ab- 
solute " '' ~nre of malaria ; there is the tonic 
effect 01 a >- 'acing climate, without its rigors ; 
an atmospl-^re filled with ozone; cool nights 
in summer, a bright, sunny sky almost every 
day in the year, conducive of cheerfulness and 
bringing a new pleasure every morning, con- 
stantly stimulating both mind and body. 

To enable persons to reach these favored 
localities without unnecessary expenditure of 
time or money, the Union Pacific has put 
in effect very low rates and splendid train 
service, three trains leaving Omaha daily for 
Denver, and two trains daily from Kansas 
City. Accommodations are provided for 
all classes of passengers on these trains, the 
equipment including free reclining chair cars, 
dining cars, buffet, smoking cars, drawing 
room sleepers and day coaches, &C. 

Ask or write for pamphlet, "The Rockies, 
Great Salt Lake and the Yellowstone," de- 
scribing in detail the attractions of the west. 

Full information cheerfully furnished on 
application to 



E. L,. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A. 

OMAHA, NEB. 




TUITION FREE 

For a limited time only we are offering tuition free in 
the following courses for home study: Illustrating. 
Caricature, Advertisement- Writing and Manage- 
ment, Journalism, Proofreading, Book-Xeeping, 
Stenography, Typewriting and Practical Elec- 
tricity. You pay us no tuition until we have secured 
a position for you. We are able to do this through our 
extensive Situation Department. We advertise atl over 
the country for positions for our students. In Illustrat- 
ing and Advertisement-Writing we find a market for 
our students' work. When writing for full particulars 
mention the subject which interests you. 

CORRESPONDENCE INSTITUTE OF AMERICA, 

BOX 701, SCRANTON, Pa. 

New York Office, 150 Nassau Street. 




DoYouKeepaGun? 

\l so, would you not like a rack for it ? 

Do you keep more 
than one gun? 

If so, would you not like racks for all 
of them ? 

For 5 yearly subscriptions to 
RECREATION 

I will send you 

a pair of buffalo horns 

beautifully polished and mounted on nickel 
bases, which may be screwed on the wall. 
A pair of these horns make a unique and 
convenient gun rack, and a valuable trophy 
of the grandest game animal America ever 
had. 

These horns are easily worth 

five dollars 

a pair and sell readily at that price. I have 
been fortunate in securing a considerable 
number of them at a price that enables me 
to make this remarkable offer. 

Send in your Club at once. 



Xll 



RECREATION. 



A BOOK 

FOR 

Sportsmen and Vacationists, 



ISSUED BY THE 



Bangor e£ Aroostook R. R. 



AND ENTITLED 



ii 





}J 



Is a Guide to the Fishing, Hunting 
and Camping Regions of 

NORTHERN MAINE. 



175 pages. Illustrated by over 100 half- 
tone cuts of scenery, fish and game. 
Handsomely designed. 
SENT FOR 10c. IN STA3IPS. 



Address : 

GEO. n. HOUGHTON, Traffic flgr. 
BANGOR, ME. 

Mention Recreation. 



" The groves were God's first temples.' 



SEPTEMBER 
IN THE 
ADIRONDACKS 



No finer place in September can be 
found than the Adirondacks. The 
air is cool and bracing, the fishing 
fine, the scenery beautiful, and they 
can be reached in a night from Boston, 
New York or Niagara Falls. All parts 
of the Adirondacks are reached by the 

NEW YORK CENTRAL LINES 



A copy of No. 20 of the " Four-Track Series,'* 
"The Adirondacks and How to Reach Them," 
will be sent tree on receipt of a 2-cent stamp by- 
George H. Daniels, General Passenger Agent, 
New York Gentral R. R., Grand Central Station, 
New York. 



Fins and Feathers 

are plentiful along the line of the 




St, Louis and San Francisco R.R. Go, 

Kansas City, Memphis and Birmingham R. R. 
SHOUT LINE TO 

MISSOURI, KANSAS, ARKANSAS, 
INDIAN AND OKLAHOMA TERRITORIES 

Texas and Mexico 

VIA ST. LOUIS, KANSAS CITY, MO., 
OR MEMPHIS 

Write for illustrated literature of interest to real 
sportsmen. 

Vestibuled Pullman Buffet Sleeper, through with- 
out change between New York and Memphis, Tenn., 
via Washington, D. C, Atlanta, Ga., and Birming- 
ham, Ala., in connection with Pennsylvania R. R. 
and Southern Ry. 



F. D. RUSSELL 

General Eastern Agent 
385 B'way, New York 



A. HILTON 

General Passenger Agent 

St. Louis, Mo. 



Three Gateways 



via 




HANNIBAL, KANSAS CITY 

ST. LOUIS to the North and East 

from 

TEXAS, INDIAN TERRITORY 
KANSAS and MISSOURI 



Write G. L. Thayer, 182 St. Nicholas Ave., 
New York, for pamphlet and further 
information 



RECREATION. 



Xlll 




Very 
Low 



^kS^ Rates 



-TO— 



Colorado 



and 



Utah 

— VIA— 

UNION PACIFIC 

Sept. i to 10 inc. 

$15 00 to Denver » Colorado Springs 
* and Pueblo and return. 

$25 00 to Glen wood and return. 
$30.00 to ^ alt Lake and return. 
$30.00 to °g den and return. 



The Fast Trains 
to Denver 

are via the 

UNION PACIFIC 



For full information apply to your near- 
est agent or address 

E. L. LOHAX, Q. P. & T. A. 

OriAHA. NEB. 



„..© THE MOST CHARM 


BUG 

K 


AlS&Df .CAP! 


rc^is _j0<* — " ii 




HIGHLANDS 
of ON TAMO 



OKA LAKES 
LAKE OF BAYS REGION 
TAWAN RI 
KAWAR 
LAKES SIMCOE _ 

EASY OF A 
IMMUNITY FROM HAY FEVER 

NEA<V MODERN HOTELS 

FR FT ILLUSTRATED 
1 IVLL PUBLICATIONS 

CAN8E MAD FROM CftANO TRUNK RAILWAY SYST£M 
AJ2&R£$S N£AJ?Z$T 0££/C£ 



Boston, Mass., 
Buffalo, N. Y., 
Chicago, III., 
Detroit, Mich., 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Hamilton, Ont., . . 
Kingston, Ont., . . 
Los Angeles, Cal., . 
Montreal, Que., 
New York, N. Y., . 
San Francisco, Cal., 
St. Paul, Minn., . . 
Toronto, Ont., . . 



T. Wynne 30fi Washington Street. 

Chas. L. Coon, 285 Main St. (Ellicott Square Bldg.). 
J. H. Burgis, . 249 Clark St. , cor. Jackson Boulevard. 

Geo. W. Watson 124 Woodward Avenue. 

, C. A. Justin, Morton House Block. 

C. E. Morgan 11 James Street, North. 

J. P. Hanley, . Comer Ontario and Johnston streets. 
W. H. Bullen, ... California Bank Building. 

J. Quinlan Bonaventure Station. 

F. P. Dwyer, .... Dun Building, 290 Broadway. 

W. O. Johnson, 219 Front Street 

David Brown, Jr. , Ill Endicott Arcade. 

J. D. McDonald, Union Station. 



".""- : :."." 






7 : .?7 



G£ME:&AL jPAS$£NG£X A/*£t T/CK£T 

*NTREAL,CANA 



n£MT/OS* THIS rtJKGA~Ztf>il 



XIV 



RECREATION. 



"FOR 34 YEARS A STANDARD PIANO." 

The Wing Piano 



YOU NEED THIS BOOK 



IF YOU INTEND TO BUY A PIANO. A book 
— not a catalogue — that gives you all the informa- 
tion possessed by experts. It makes the selection of a piano easy. If read carefully, it will make you 
a judge of tone, action, workmanship, and finish; will tell you how to know good from bad. It de- 
scribes the materials used ; gives pictures of all the different parts, and tells how they should be made 
and put together. It is the only book of its kind ever published. It contains 116 large pages, and is 
named "' The Book of Complete Information About Pianos." We send it free to anyone wishing 
t o buy a piano. Write for it. 

P ATTP T7D/^M\7T ^tnn P TT\ <f)fin We make the WING PIANO and sell it our- 
JAVH rXV^lVl JUUU 1 \J 4>ZUU selves. It goes direct from our factory to 
your home. We do not employ any agents or salesmen. When you buy the WING PIANO you pay 
the actual cost of construction and our small wholesale profit. This profit is small because we sell 
thousands of pianos yearly. Most retail stores sell no more than twelve to twenty pianos yearly, and 
must charge from $100 to $200 profit on each. They can't help it. 




A Wing style — 45 other styles to select from. 

QThMT* riM HTPTAT WE PAY FREIGHT. NO MONEY IN ADVANCE. We will 
O.C1N 1 WIN 1 lVir\.i^ send any WING PIANO to any part of the United States on 
trial. We pay freight in advance and do not ask for any advance payment or deposit. If the piano is 
not satisfactory after twenty days' trial in your home, we take it back entirely at our expense. You pay 
us nothing unless you keep the piano. There is absolutely no risk or expense to you. 

Old instruments taken in exchange. EASY MONTHLY PAYJ1ENTS. 

INSTRUMENTAL ATTACHMENT ftSJ*j t *SSaj£ %SS§ 

the tones of the mandolin, guitar, harp, zither and banjo. 

T"M 'XA "VT7 A "D Q 3 3 nflfi "DTATVIT^Q We refer to over 33,000 satisfied purchasers 
UN 04: I£L/\IV > 3 00,UUU IMrVlNvJO in every part of the United States. WING 
PIANOS are guaranteed for twelve years against any defect in tone, action, workmanship, or material. 



Are just as carefully made as Wing Pianos. They have a sweet, 
powerful, lasting tone, easy action, very handsome appearance, need 
Wing Organs are sold direct from the factory, sent on trial ; are sold on easy monthly 
payments. For catalogue and prices write to 



WING ORGANS 

no tuning. 



V 



WING & SON, 226an 4f^ K 2 . thSW 

J868 — 34th Year— J902. 



RECREATION. 



xv 



TWO DOLLARS 

FOR A NAME 



We want your dealers' 
name ( Stationer, Jeweler or 
Druggist) and as an induce- 
ment for you to send it to 
us, we will send postpaid, 
your choice of these popular 
styles 

LAUGHLIN FOUNTAIN PEN 

Superior to the $3.00 grades 
of other makes, for the name, 
and only 




fOUNTAIN/ 







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424 Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 



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XVI 



RECREATION. 



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ONE WENT UNDER THE TABLE AND THE OTHER OVER IT. 

166 



Volume XVII. 



RECREATION 

SEPTEMBER, 1902. 
G. 0. SHIELDS (COQUINA), Editor and Manager 



Number 3. 



MOUNTAIN SHEEP IN IDAHO. 



GEO. F. WRIGHT. 



We started to look up one of Ida- 
ho's lost mines. There are several. 
This one was of the right sort, how- 
ever; not the kind where an old and 
dying prospector draws a map on a 
piece of bark, using blood instead of 
ink, and the hero does the rest. The 
story goes, or it does with some, that 
a man by the name of Giles had 
made a stake in the placer mines in 
the early 6o's, and on his way out he 
ran into a goodsized bunch of Sho- 
shone, or Snake, Indians who were 
handing down to posterity some hair- 
lifting tales by means of a paint 
brush and the side of a mountain. 
Giles was thirsting for knowledge or 
a place to hide, but the reds saw him 
first. He put on the boldest face he 
had with him, stepped up to the boss 
painter, cocked his head on one side, 
glanced at the canvas, so to speak, 
and tried to think up a good talk. 
The bucks stood around with war 
clubs at half mast waiting for a ver- 
dict ; but Giles, though a diplomat, 
after a fashion, got confused. One 
set of scrappers in the picture were 
all cut up camp stove length, and, 
there being no flags, he could not tell 
whether the battle had gone to the 
Nez Perces or the Snakes, and 
whether the picture was a sort of 
monument to a great victory or a 
place for a lot of widowed squaws to 
go and butt their heads against. He 
took no chances, but asked the artist 
where he got his dye stuff. That 
would not fit in some countries, but 



it was a compliment there, as the In- 
dians prided themselves on having 
the best and most lasting article in 
paints in that section. They were so 
pleased they gave up the secret. 

"Burned the rocks," said the boss. 

Giles did not know whether it was 
a joke, or if it was safe to build a 
fire anywhere except on the water ; 
but they quickly relieved his mind in 
a manner different from that usually 
meted out to a white man. They 
took him to a place where one of the 
walls of a ledge had peeled off and 
exposed several feet of what he at 
first thought was gold. He began 
looking around to see if Solomon had 
left any of his tools lying about, but 
a closer inspection satisfied him 
it was only copper. He took a few 
pounds, to show he was a sure 
enough prospector, went to Lewiston, 
threw his mountain rig into his cabin, 
and went back East. There he lived 
in good style until one hazy day he 
went up against Wall street with a 4 
flush. 

When he crawled out from under 
the trance he thought of the great 
and glorious West. He hit the trail 
so hard that in a few weeks he was 
back in Idaho and at the cabin de- 
serted nearly 30 years before. Lew- 
iston was a city and the cabin a 
wreck. The only thing the pack rats 
had left was the old chunk of ore. 
Giles had it essayed, and nearly had a 
fit when he got returns that it was 
about one-eighth gold and the rest 



167 



16S 



RECREATION. 



copper. Back to the Snake river and 
the picture gallery he flew, but time 
had made many changes. Bushes had 
grown to trees and water spouts had 
harrowed up the country. With his 
failing memory he could only locate 
a few scattered paintings, and the In- 
dians were gone, as Chief Joseph, of 
the Nez Perces, had cleaned up the 
Shoshone bucks and sold the squaws 
to the white miners over in the placer 
diggings. Giles is still out there, try- 
ing to locate the paint shop. 

We were also trying to find tha£ 
or anything else that looked as if it 
would make a mine. We finally ran 
out of meat, and had to take a trip 
up to the snow. In less than an hour 
we had 2 bighorn rams. That night 
in the cabin, while one of the 
boys was making dough gods and 
broiling a few choice pieces of moun- 
tain sheep to fit in several large appe- 
tites, the dog, which was a cross 
between a set of bunks and some gro- 
ceries, thought he heard something- 
down in the garden digging up one of 
his caches, and went out to investigate. 
His master followed. They returned 
so rapidly that one went under the 
table and the other over it. It was 
several minutes before we found out 
that the dog had tried to bring a 
cougar into camp alive and had near- . 
ly succeeded. 

A few days later, while walking 
along the river, I saw a mountain 
sheep standing in a little pool of sun- 
warmed water. I got quite close to 
it before either of us was aware of 
the other's presence. The animal 
was so low down I concluded she 
had a lamb near and thought the 
warm water had taken the curl out 
of her hairpins, as her horns were 
nearly straight. What interested me 
most was the way she was winking 
her nose, just as a llama in a St. 
Louis zoo once did before it spit a 
wad of chewed grass on to my new 
white shirt and into my eyes. As the 
sheep and I stood facing each other, 
I thought I ought to have one of 



those street car health signs hanging 
to my neck. She was not loaded, 
however, and soon trotted off up hill, 
where a monkey could not go with- 
out climbers. 

If any one doubts the sheep story 
I shall be pleased to send him the ad- 
dress of an old hunter and Indian 
fighter, who doesn't drink, and who 
says he has seen several such sheep. 
I don't think anyone will doubt his 
word when they learn that he is one 
of the survivors of the 'Dobe Walls 
fight ; one of the gallant little band 
that held those mud walls for days 
and days and several nights against 
a stampede of Mexicans, Indians and 
other chopped feed. He had a 
younger brother with him, and to- 
gether they were defending a weak 
spot in the dobe, when the allied 
forces rammed a hole in it with a log. 
Anyone who has ever been down in 
that section without a water bottle, 
where everything that is not red hot 
has a hook or a thorn on it, wdl 
appreciate the log part of this his- 
tory. When the hole was made, 
the younger brother was hit by a bul- 
let, fired probably by a Mexican with 
his eyes shut. As he fell the elder 
brother just doubled him up and 
stuffed him into the hole, thereby 
stopping the influx of poisoned ar- 
rows, copper balls, and sand fleas. At 
that stage of the game the blast of a 
C sharp bugle was heard, and the al- 
lied forces started for Mexico. 

After 2 or 3 extra sessions of Con- 
gress it was decided in Washington 
that there was trouble in New Mex- 
ico. Word was sent out to the com- 
mandant of the nearest post, except 
the one the hole had been punched 
with, that he could move, which was 
ridiculous to him, as he had the gout ; 
but he sent his able second in com- 
mand, and they arrived tired and 
hungry. The human plug was pulled 
out of the wall and both were mended. 
The younger brother is telling for- 
tunes for the miners, the elder telling 
lies for the drinks. 



WHERE THE WILD DUCK QUACKS. 



GEORCxE MCADAM. 



You may talk about your fishing, 
Where the water boils a-swishing, 
And of going home with nothing but vour 
"fish tales" 
In 

Your 

Sack; 

But for me there's nothing in it, 
To compare with one sweet minute, 
When, gun in hand, I hear the mallard 
Quack I 

Quack ! 

Quack ! 

On a joyous autumn morning, 
Out just before its dawning, 
When the throb of nature in vour veins, 
leaves 

In your 

Heart 

No lack; 

Down to the water gunning, 
You are hurried into running, 
For up the lake he's coming, with his 
Quack ! 

Quack ! 

Quack ! 

But he's there before you're ready, 
And he's gone before you're steady 
Enough to train your fowling-piece so's to 
get 

Him in 

Y r our 

Sack; 



But you needn't look so sorry; 
Just climb into that dory, 
And get ready for the soiree, of the 
Quack ! 

Quack! 

Quack ! 

For there's plenty to be doing, 
While you're standing 'round a-stewing; 
And the gay and festive duck for fooling 
hunters 
Has 

A 

Knack. 

Your decoys must be just right, 
You must yourself be out of sight, 
And your boat be hidden quite, at the 
Quack ! 

Quack ! 

Quack ! 

Oh, to fool the wary flyer, 
Than which there is none shyer, 
And bring him home, so plump and round, 
enclosed 
Within 

Your 

Sack! 

This is surely recreation, 
And will make a whole vacation 
For the man who's left vocation for the 
Quack ! 

Quack ! 

Quack! 



A Hamilton girl who had been very 
clever at college came home the other day 
and said to her mother : "Mother, I've 
graduated, but now I wish to take up 
psychology, philology, bibli — " 

"Just wait a minute," said the mother. 
"I have arranged for you a thorough course 
in roastology, boilology, stitchology, darn- 
ology, patchology. and general domestic- 
ology. Now put on your apron and pluck 
that chicken." — Saxby's Magazine. 

j6g 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY RICHARD HALL, 



AN EXCLUSIVE PICNIC. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY EDWARD C CONGDON. 



THE RUSHTON OF OUR ANCESTORS, 

170 



A MOOSE QUARTETTE AND A SOLO. 



J. R. KING. 



September o, 1901, Dr. D. W. Greene of 
Dayton, Ohio, and I started for a moose 
hunt in New Brunswick, arriving at Fred- 
erickton the nth. We remained there one 
day, buying provisions and necessary foot- 
wear. For the benefit of those who have 
not taken a hunting trip in New Bruns- 
wick I suggest that they defer buying foot- 
wear until they reach Frederickton. We 
received much valuable assistance from Mr. 
R. P. Allen, secretary of the Tourist Asso- 
ciation of Frederickton. Those contem- 
plating a trip there will find him a valuable 
assistant and thoroughly reliable. 

The afternoon of September 12, we start- 
ed for Boistown, arriving at 6 p.m.. 
There we were met by E. W. and 
B. Norrad, who were to be our 
guides. They took us that evening by wag- 
on to Hayesville, 10 miles distant. Early 
the next morning we were ready to start 
for their camps, 30 miles Northwest. From 
Hayesville we went 4 miles by wagon. Then 
everything had to be loaded on a sled and 
hauled the remainder of the way, over a 
fairly good road through an unbroken for- 
est. That took us nearly 2 days as we had 
a heavy load. One can go the whole dis- 
tance from Hayesville to Norrad's camp on 
horseback in one day, if preferred,. We 
arrived there Saturday afternoon, the 14th, 
in good shape, rested Sunday, and early 
Monday morning started for Little lake, 3 
miles distant. 

We found well trodden moose paths 
around the lake, but saw no moose, nor 
could we get any response to the horn. At 
noon, while we were eating lunch, a cow 
moose and her calf, a yearling bull, came 
within 50 feet, and after gazing inquiringly 
at us started leisurely away through the 
woods ; this owing, no doubt, to the fact 
that the wind was blowing from them to us. 

The remainder of that day and the next 
were spent in diligent search for our game, 
but without avail. Wednesday, the 18th, 
while walking through a thick wood, the 
doctor suddenly came on a fine bull moose, 
but it got out of sight before he could fire. 
The same day I saw a cow and a calf feed- 
ing in Twin Sister lake, about 5 miles from 
Little lake. The next day Mr. Ed Norrad 
and I went to Brown lake, 3 miles North- 
east of his camp, and a little after sundown 
we saw a bull moose enter the lake on the 
opposite side from us, about half a mile 
away. I tried to work around to get a 
shot, the wind being unfavorable, but the 
bull took fright before I was near enough, 



and hurrying out of the water he disap- 
peared in the woods. 

The next morning was all that could be 
asked. A sharp frost during the night and 
not a breath of air to disturb the lake made 
it perfect for calling. We were early at the 
lake, took up our station where we had 
been the night before and called, but got no 
response. On my suggestion we went to 
the point where we had seen the bull enter 
the lake the night previous, and called. At 
the second call an answer came from across 
the lake and a few moments later his bull- 
ship entered the water and deliberately 
waded toward us, keeping in shoal water. 
That was my first good view of a bull 
moose in his native state. He was a mag- 
nificent specimen, with large antlers. His 
bell, as nearly as we could judge, was fully 
18 inches long, as it dragged in the water 
when his body was nearly clear. We had 
ample time to observe all that, which we 
did under a glass, as it took him nearly 20 
minutes to round the end of the lake. 
When about 300 yards distant, he turned 
from us toward the shore, and fearing he had 
our scent, as the wind had started a little 
in his direction, my guide advised me to 
fire. I took deliberate aim across a stump, 
behind which I was sitting, and fired. Mr. 
Bull stopped, turned slightly toward us and 
looked surprised to think that anyone 
should dare so rudely to break the solitude 
of his haunts. I tried twice more, taking 
careful aim each time, but he still stood 
unmoved. As I was shooting a 45-90, with 
black powder shells, the smoke was so 
dense I could scarcely see the moose. On 
the third shot* I saw the bullet strike the 
water some distance short of the mark. 
I then aimed high and saw the next shot 
strike the water just under his body be- 
tween the fore and hind legs. The maga- 
zine being empty, I hastily reloaded and 
got in 2 more shots before he reached 
the brush, but without effect. The gun had 
been loaned me through the kindness of 
Mr. William Chestnut of Frederickton, 
and not being familiar with its capacity 
we had . expected too much of it. Owing 
to the larger caliber I had taken that gun 
with me in preference to my own, a 30-30 
Winchester with smokeless shells. The 
latter gun, I became satisfied later, is of too 
small a caliber for moose unless one can 
strike a vital spot. 

Had we remained at the place first se- 
lected by us in the morning the moose 
must have passed within 50 yards in front 



172 



RECREATION. 



of us and would have afforded a most ex- 
cellent shot. 

Owing to the unusually warm fall we 
found we were about 10 days too early for 
the mating season and could get no an- 
swer from the bulls, although we found 
numerous tracks and spoor about the lakes, 
especially Lake Tahoe, 5 miles from our 
main camp, where Mr. Ed Norrad and I 
went September 26th. There were 3 
sharp frosts in the latter part of the month, 
with good effect. The evening of the 30th, 
we got good responses to calls, but could 
not get the moose near enough for a shot, 
although one of our party saw 2 large bulls 
across the lake.. 

The next morning, being too windy for 
good results, we got no answers. The fol- 
lowing evening, however, was almost per- 
fect. A short time before sundown, a 
large bull answered the horn from about a 
mile distant. He came from the West, 
tearing through the woods, making as 
much noise as a runaway team of horses, 
until within 200 yards, when he suddenly 
stopped and would not come nearer, de- 
spite the seductive notes of the horn and all 
the wiles adopted by Norrad. Much ex- 
cited, I waited on the opposite side of a 
small barren for a sight of the moose, but 
the timber completely hid him from view. A 
few moments later we heard a deep grunt 
from the Northwest, followed by the rattle 
of horns heralding the approach of another 
large bull. He came steadily on to the 
edge of the timber 75 yards distant, but it 
was then too dark to see to shoot, even had 
he come out. Almost simultaneously with 
his arrival, came another from the West 
and one from the South, and the quartette 
we had near us for nearly an hour, would 
put to shame the famous jubilee singers. 

We determined, as we could not get a 
shot, to get as much fun oyt of the affair 
as possible, and gradually creeping through 
the hardack brush until we reached a point 
30 yards from the moose, where we were 
screened by a clump of trees, we took up 
our station. Norrad called and grunted 
alternately on the horn, which infuriated 
the animals so that they tore up the ground, 
hooked the bushes and trees and attacked 
one another, bellowing and snorting con- 
stantly. The heavy voiced one seemed to 
be monarch of them all, as we could hear 
him chase the others about. He finally at- 
tacked a dead pine stub, which we after- 
ward found to be over 40 feet long and 
about 8 inches in diarrfeter, with such force 
that it cracked, and finally, with a crash, 
fell to the ground. The bull celebrated the 
event by several bellows of triumph which 
we applauded. This caused them all, ex- 
cept the "big voice" to hasten away. He 
started slowly back to the ridge from which 
he had come, grunting in apparent disgust 



at each step, until the sound gradually died 
away in the distance. 

This was a most thrilling experience, 
and alone worth the price of the whole trip. 
After stumbling along through the dark 
nearly an hour we reached our tent, tired 
and hungry. At noon the next day Mr. 
Jim Moone, a camp attache, arrived, bring- 
ing me the doctor's gun, an 8 millometer 
Mannlicher. He told us the doctor had 
killed a large moose at 10 a.m. and a cari- 
bou at 5 p.m. the day before with a single 
shot each, and hence his full complement. 

That evening we took up our stations on 
opposite sides of the lake, and the sec- 
ond call was answered by a bull coming 
from the ridge on the West side of the 
lake. As the main trail from that ridge 
had several branches when nearing the 
lake, the wisest thing seemed to go to meet 
him, lest he should become confused and 
lose his way. In a short time he made his 
appearance, grunting at each step, and took 
the trail leading nearest the lake. Being so 
screened by firs, it was impossible to get a 
good shot until he had approached within 
40 yards, and then only his flank was vis- 
ible between the trees. Almost simultane- 
ously with the report of the gun, the bull 
pitched forward, falling on his head, but 
immediately sprang to his feet, facing. The 
next shot I fired at the middle of his fore- 
head, striking about one inch below the 
base of the horns. He fell again and lay 
several seconds as if dead. All at once he 
bounded to his feet, but was still so screen- 
ed by trees that again only his flank was 
visible. The third shot struck just 2> T A 
inches from the first. He fell again and to 
all appearances was dead. The rest of the 
party then came up, and on turning around 
after greeting them, to point out the moose 
we found he had got up and slipped away 
so quietly he had not been heard. On 
search, he was found standing in a fir 
thicket, 50 yards away, but on our ap- 
proach he wheeled and started straight to- 
ward the lake. I fired my 30-30, the ball 
striking 4 inches below the back bone and 
passing the entire length of him. That 
seemed only to hasten his speed toward the 
lake, some 75 yards distant. My next shot 
was wild, striking his horns. He had then 
entered the water and he began to swim 
for the opposite shore. By the time we 
reached the edge of the lake he was 125 
yards out, swimming low down, exposing 
only his head. The next shot was fired 
from the Mannlicher and broke his lower 
jaw. That seemed to confuse him so that 
he raised his neck some distance out of the 
water, affording a good target. I fired at 
this mark, the ball striking him about 8 
inches back of the left ear, and coming out 
at the base of the right ear. That settled 
him, and he sank head downward in \0 



1 MOOSE QUARTETTE AND A SOLO. 



173 



feet of water, his head resting on the bot- 
tom, his hind parts just visible. 

We proceeded at once to make a raft by 
cutting some dry pine trees and lashing 
them together with ropes. Mr. Norrad and 
Mr. Moone succeeded in towing the moose 




RAFTING ON LITTLE LAKE. 

near shore, when he grounded. They im- 
mediately abandoned the raft, jumped into 
the ice-cold water up to their arms, and 
hauled him near enough to attach a rope 
to his horns, when the 3 of us finally suc- 
ceeded in hauling him near the bank. The 
raft was then brought alongside and by 
means of skids, ropes and handspikes, we 
landed him high and dry. 

I was highly elated.. Mr. Norrad, who 
has had much experience, said the moose 
was one of the largest, if not the largest, 
he had ever seen. Three experienced per- 
sons estimated the weight of the moose at 
1800 pounds. On examination, we found 
that both of the shots in the flank had 



passed entirely through the body, and that 
cither of them would have instantly killed 
or disabled any ordinary animal. The shot 
in the forehead had penetrated one-half 
inch just at the base of the horns and the 
bullet had crumbled as fine as shot, part of 
it being melted in the skull. It had not, 
however, gone through the skull, which at 
that point was over one inch thick and as 
hard as ivory. 

Judging from what the guides tell me 
and by my experience I feel sure that had 
I depended on my 30-30 the result might 
have been different. While I regard the 30- 
30 as a hard shooter, it does not, in my 
opinion, carry sufficient lead to give a par- 
alyzing shock to so large an animal as a 
moose, especially during the mating season, 
when they seem to possess abnormal vital- 
ity. 

The next day I returned to the main 
camp, leaving the guide and 2 men to bring 
in the trophies. On my arrival there, mu- 
tual felicitations were exchanged between 
the doctor and me. I learned that he and 
his guide, Benniah Norrad, had seen 6 bulls 
and one cow 3 miles Southwest of the 
main camp, the same day that the doctor 
shot his moose. Judging from the number 
seen and heard during our stay and from 
the signs about the various lakes, there 
were nearly 100 moose within a radius of 8 
miles from our main camp. 

Mr. Norrad is well equipped with 2 good 
log camps and will build 2 more the com- 
ing summer. These outside camps are 
readily reached by good trails from the 
main one, from which provisions, etc., 
can be taken by a one horse sleigh to the 
outside camps. Mr. Norrad's territory is 
leased from the actual owners of the land, 
and is easily reached from Boistown. I 
can not speak too highly of the Norrad 
brothers. They are scrupulously honest, 
strictly temperate, industrious workers, and 
thoroughly qualified for tfieir position as 
guides. 

At the camp we left Graf von Armin, an 
attache of the German legation at Wash- 
ington. After a day's rest, we started on 
our return home, well pleased with our 
success. 



Church — I see a California man who 
raises Belgian hares claims to have one as 
large as a voting cow. 

Gotham — I never could believe any of 
those hare-raising stories. — Yonkers States- 
man. 



PLATEAU WILDCAT. 



ALLAN BROOKS. 



This handsome lynx, named in honor of 
the energetic assistant chief of the Biolog- 
ical Survey, is found from Arizona North 
to Southern British Columbia, but is con- 
fined to the semi-arid portions of the 
Rocky mountain region and West to the 
Eastern slopes of the Cascades. I have 
not heard of it farther North than Shus- 
wap lake. It certainly does not occur in 
the Cariboo district to the Northward. 



pencils of hair on the ears are fairly well 
developed, reaching a length of Y\ inch. 
In haDits. the plateau wildcat species re- 
sembles other species, being rarely seen 
even in districts where it is common, doing 
nearly all its hunting at night, though I 
once observed one hunting SpermopJiilcs at 
noon of a summer's day. This wildcat 
seems much easier to trap than its Pacific 
coast relative, fasciatus, and, like that ani- 




PLATEAU WILDCAT. LYNX BAILEYI. 



Throughout the Northern portion of its 
range it frequents the brush and heavily 
timbered bottoms, rarely ascending into 
the mountains, though occasionally it can 
be trapped in the same localities as its 
larger relative, the Canada lynx. In col- 
oration it is not unlike that animal, but 
always possesses the black barring of the 
legs and spotting of the lower parts, 
though in a much less degree than the 
other wildcats of North America. The 



mal, and all others of the same family, it 
will not fight when trapped. Only occa- 
sionally will one be found with enough 
pluck to defend itself when being dis- 
patched. 

Unlike most of the cat tribe, this soe- 
cies is generally excessively fat. The 
weight of an ordinary adult will range 
from 15 to 20 pounds, a large old male 
weighing 25 pounds. The iris is light red- 
dish hazel, with a roun.dis.li pupiL 



Mr. D. Speptic — My dear, I wish you'd 
prepare something occasionally to tempt 
my appetite. 

His Wife — The idea ! Why. you haven't 
any appetite to tempt. — Catholic Standard. 

174 



A MOOSE HUNT IN NORTHERN MAINE. 



A. HEDGES. 



That section of country lying in Aroos- 
took county, bounded on the South by the 
Bangor & Aroostook railroad, on the East 
and West by the Caribou and Ashland 
branch of the same line, and on the North 
by the Ashland and Caribou wagon road, 
contains as many moose and deer as any 
section of the same size in Maine. Its 
leading advantages are : Its proximity to 
the railroad, which makes it possible to be- 
come comfortably settled in camp within 
24 hours after leaving Boston ; and its many 
waterways, making it easy to boat large 
game out to the settlements. Good guides 
can be hired at any of the railroad towns 
at reasonable rates. Those not wishing to 
rough it can obtain good board in those 
towns, many of which are within a few 
hours' tramp of excellent deer hunting, with 
even the chance of running across a stray 
moose. Grouse can be found in most lo- 
calities throughout that section. 

Although it is a moose country, I had 
failed to bring a moose to bag after 2 sea- 
sons of careful hunting. I always returned 
with my full quota of deer, but that failed 
to satisfy me. I wanted moose and noth- 
ing but a moose would or could fill the bill. 
If ever a country owed a fellow a moose, 
that one certainly did me. I had worked, 
tramped and paddled enough to earn at 
least a small one. When the time drew 
near for the third attempt I anxiously 
awaited the date set for our departure to 
again take up the trail. The evening of 
November 8 found Mert, my hunting 
companion, and me abroad the Bangor Ex- 
press from Boston, our destination beine 
Masardis, a small town on the Ashland 
Branch of the B. and A. The following 
noon we were met at the station by our 
guide, Clarence, and a drive of 5 miles 
took us to his comfortable house. 

While getting our outfit ready for the 
morrow's hunt, we planned to give the 
country to the Eastward a careful scour- 
ing, and if that failed to show us moose 
or their fresh sign we were to go on to 
Clarence's camp at the head of Black 
Water brook. 

We saved Clarence the trouble of calling 
us in the morning, and were soon ready for 
our hunt. In crossing the field in front of 
the house we saw 2 deer at the farther 
side, quietly eying us. They received a 
fusilade, with the result of breaking a 



fore leg of the doe. Leaving Mert to fol- 
low her, the guide and I made for a strip 
of burned land at the foot of Squaw Pan 
lake. 

On entering the burn, we ran across 
fresh tracks of a large bull moose. By 
the signs we concluded he was feeding 
slowly, and unless frightened must be near. 
The wind being favorable we sep'arated, 
Clarence following the track, which 
led along the edge of the burn, and I keep- 
ing abreast along the slope of the ridge. 
We had not gone far when my companion 
motioned me to join him. As I came up 
he pointed to the tracks of 3 other moose 
crossing the trail we were following. 
Again separating, we cautiously advanced 
as before, keeping a sharp lookout anead. 
In a few minutes I heard the report of the 
guide's rifle. I turned in time to see 3 
large bulls running ahead. A fourth was 
standing in a clump of ash, 40 yards away, 
and showing by his actions that he was 
badly wounded. Leaving Clarence to take 
care of that one, I tried to get a shot at 
the 3 others. Just as I singled out the 
largest he swung to the left and made for 
the top of the ridge. By taking that course 
he brought a small thicket between us. I 
sprinted through the bushes and on coming 
out saw the moose standing broadside and 
looking in my direction, with only 170 yards 
of clear ground separating us. 

There was the chance of a lifetime. I 
carefully brought the ivory bead to bear 
just back of the shoulder ar " grasping the 
rifle in a still firmer hand, held my breath 
and fired. I saw the dust and hair fly as 
the bullet struck in the right place. Has- 
tily working a cartridge into the chamber 
I again fired at the shoulder. That shot 
brought him to his knees ; he faltered a 
second, then fell over on his side, dead. 

Clarence having finished his bull now 
made his appearance and after a silent 
hand shake we compared notes. We 
dressed our , rizes and returned to the 
house, where we found Mert, who had not 
succeeded in overtaking his wounded doe. 
We intended to haul the moose out the fol- 
lowing morning, but a heavy fall of snow 
prevented our doing so until the third day. 
Because of the deep snow and a crust which 
made still hunting an impossibility we 
brought nothing to bag in the remainder of 
our 2 weeks' stay. 



Some things are not what they seam ; 
tailors, for instance. 



175 



THE MONARCH'S BATTLE CRY. 



R. T. L. 



A streak of soft light in the Eastern sky 
Proclaimed the coming of another day; 

And ere the hilltops gleamed with sunshine 
bright, 
The birds took up again their happy lay. 

Among the hills reposed a placid lake, 
A little cottage on its wooded shore ; 

And when the sun the cabin windows kissed. 
An honest hunter stood without the door. 

While gazing on this pleasant, peaceful 
scene, 
His memory took him to anotner place 
Where, mid the city's turmoil, strife and 
din, 
The people strove in gain's mad, wearing 
race. 

But hark! across the wateis of the lake 
There comes a sound which stirs the 
hunter's blood ! 

It echoes clearly now from shore to shore, 
Then dies away within the distant wood. 

All rangers of the forest know that sound — 
The call to battle of the forest king ; 

And as the hunter stands with mind intent, 
He hears once more that call to combat 
ring! 

The hunter turns with eager, noiseless tread, 
And steps within the little cabin door; 



But soon appears, with trusty rifle grasped, 
And glides along the path which skirts 
the shore. 

He halts at last among the forest trees, 
And from some birchen bark a trumpet 
makes. 
Now quick the answering battle cry rings 

forth, 
And o'er the rippling waves an echo wakes. 

At first no answer greets his list'ning ear. 

Then clear, above the sighing of the trees, 
In swelling cadence comes again the sound 

Across the limpid waters on the breeze. 

With keen suspense, and rifle held in poise, 
He waits the coming moose — that noble 
game 
Which oft, in woodland glades in regions 
wild, 
Has made for huntsmen long enduring 
fame. 

With ponderous tread, and mighty head 
upraised, 
The monarch of the woods comes into 
view. 
The rifle cracks ! The warrior's days are 
o'er ! 
He reels and falls, his valiant heart 
pierced through. 




ATTENTION ! 

176 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY E. T. WOOD. 



AN ADIRONDACK LAKER. 



II. R. RARNARD. 



Buoy fishing for lake trout during sum- 
mer in the Adirondack^ seems the most 
successful method of taking this wary fish. 
Trolling is often tried, but on the whole 
is unsatisfactory. The guides of that sec- 
tion do not approve of buoy fishing. They 
think too many trout are taken that way, 
and I presume some catches have been 
made which warrant that feeling ; but no 
true sportsman would carry it to excess 
even if he had the chance. 

While camping with a small party a 
year ago I had occasion to try various 
methods of fishing, but was unsuccessful 
in trolling with a spinner and in 
drifting with a minnow. As a last resort 
a buoy was anchored and baited faithfully 
twice a day. with cut-up chuts, suckers, 
sunfish and frogs, and not until the third 
day was it fished. Three trout averaging 
3 pounds were taken in as many minutes, 
and then the fish failed to respond. 

Day after day the buoy was fished and 
then baited and each person of our party 
tried his luck without success. Those 3 
lakers had deluded us. with a promise of 
good luck, but as it turned out we had to 
be content with bacon and flapjacks, al- 
though we occasionally caught a small 
brook trout. 

The only thing that made me and another 
of the party persevere at the buoy was the 
fact that about every other day one/or the 
other would have a good bite ; but for some 
reason we were unable to hook a fish. My 
companion gave it up as a bad job, so I 
was left alone. Twice a day I was at the 
buoy. Earlv in the morning and often from 
2 until 6 at night I would sit, determined 
to catch a laker. 

One afternoon, out unusually early be- 
cause of a bite the preceding day, I set 3 
lines from the boat, which, I presume, some 
will say was a highly unsportsmanlike pro- 
ceeding. In addition to this I held my 
rod in my hand and settled down patiently. 

About 4 o'clock I had a bite on a hand 
line at the other end of the boat. Hastily 
scrambling for it, I gave a quick jerk and 
hooked. I began pulling in eagerly when 
all the lines started running out and I 
soon realized my fish had wound himself 
around all of them. Naturally, I got rat- 
tled in the general mix-up and lost my fish. 

My lines were badly tangled, but I got 



my rod line out all right and resumed 
fishing. Soon another pull put my tip 
under water. I had this one, but he made 
known his intention of heading for the 
buoy rope. In order to check him I grasped 
my line and started hauling him in hand 
over hand. He was coming pretty fast and 
in my imagination I saw him lying in the 
bottom of the boat, his spots gleaming in 
the sun. He shot up into the air, unhooked 
himself and fell into the boat — a monster 
sucker with flaps on his mouth an' inch 
wide. When I brought him in 2 of' the 
party saw him and gave me the laugh, but 
we cut off his head and palmed him off on 
the third as a brown trout. 

I caught several nice lakers that week, 
but during the last of mv stay succeeded 
in getting one to be proud of. 

Early one morning I was fishing at the 
buoy with my rod and an Automatic com- 
bination reel, which I got through Recrea- 
tion. In my oninion it lays over them all. 

When my bait was on bottom or several 
inches above I had about 6 feet of line left 
on my reel. Hardly anticipating a bite 
that morning I was thinking of going in 
when a fish struck and carried off the 
slack in a flash. Being taken unawares 
I felt my line grow taut. My tip went 
under and my little finger pressed the 
brake just in time. Three feet was pulled 
from a tight spring, the boat swung around 
and the fish was checked. The last pull 
brought me to my feet and I certainly 
thought I had a 30-pounder. 

Then ensued those glorious moments all 
anglers love, when the spring responds to 
each lunge and as quickly gathers your ad- 
vantage. Back and forth I played him 
until my arms ached with the strain, but 
he was slowly losing ground. I checked 
hard his every lunge, knowing both rod 
and line were unbreakable when properly 
handled. At last I had the satisfaction of 
seeing him. From 10 feet beneath the sur- 
face he came up steadily, thoroughly played 
out. The strain had been too great for 
him. Then he lay on the surface, slowly 
rolling- himself in the line. Carefully put- 
ting my fineers under his gills with an 
effort I laid him in the boat. As it proved 
later he weighed 10 pounds. I soon put 
him out of his misery by breaking his neck, 
let out a whoop and pulled anchor. 



"Do you believe in heredity?" 
"Certainly ; I know a barber who has 
3 little shavers." — Exchange. 



177 




Chaj-Q Hu.Ay>*>, j^oh 



THE LITTLE SINGER'S TRAGIC DEATH. 



178 



A TINY TRAGEDY. 



L. C. Kli.MSON. 



The first faint light of early dawn was 
stealing through the tree tops which 
fringed the Eastern horizon as I arranged 
myself behind an apology for a blind, 
which consisted of a few sticks of drift- 
wood and some willow bushes. Ducks were 
not plentiful in those waters, but during 
April there were occasional flocks passing 
from lake to lake and, as several had been 
seen within the preceding few days, I decid- 
ed to try my luck with them that morning. 
The place where I sat commanded the con- 
necting channel between 2 portions of a 
lake. It was the best obtainable position, 
for the birds in flying up or down the lake 
invariably passed through this narrow 
space, which was bordered by alder bushes 
and willows. "From this point I could 
reach any bird passing between me and the 
opposite shore. 

Nature gradually awakened about me at 
the kiss of the rising sun. A flock of black- 
birds called cheerily as they passed 
Northward, their glossy plumage covered 
with a metallic sheen by the glancing rays 
of light. A muskrat stole from its lair and 
swam boldly around the corner among the 
willow sprouts. Hardly a breath of air 
was stirring, and there w r as just enough 
motion of the water to cause a gentle but 
constant lap, lap, against the stony bank. 

An hour passed and not a duck. I 
leaned over the blind and peeped down the 
full length of the wooded shore. Ah ! 
What is that? Mere black specks, one, 2, 
3, 5 of them, headed my way. I braced 
my feet firmly against a stone and broke 
off" a twig which had been scratching my 
cheek. Still they came, steady as clock- 
work, stretched in a perfect line, the leader 
well in advance. My gun was opened 
nervously and the shells examined. All 
right; 3^ drams of powder and \}/% 
ounces of No. 4 shot. They were black 
ducks and coming directly up the channel. 
The tip of my srun covered the leader and 
was quickly advanced, straight on a line 
with his neck and 3 feet ahead of him. 

Bang ! — Bang ! — 

The first falls. Hurrah ! The second 
shot also took effect and the bird last in the 
line flopped helplessly on its side in the 
water. Another double and they were go- 
ing like the wind, too. One dropped with- 
out a struggle. 

As I pushed the old scow from beneath 
the bushes the 3 remaining ducks were 
just disappearing in the blue distance far 
up the lake. I picked up the birds and 
paddled back to the blind well satisfied 
with myself and my little Syracuse gun. 



179 



Quiet reigned once more. The only re- 
maining signs of the exciting moments just 
past were the birds lying at my side and 
a faint odor of burnt powder which lingered 
around my gun. 

Directly opposite me on the other shore 
a clump of pussy willows nodded to and 
fro, and as I sat watching the stretch of 
blue water, first to the North and then to 
the South, I was, suddenly attracted'toward 
those willows by an exquisite burst of 
melody. On the very topmost branch a 
little song sparrow was perched, his head 
held back, and his whole strength thrown 
into the rendering of the song, so small in 
itself and yet so clear and sweet that I fell 
quite in love with the sober-colored little 
singer and became so deeply engrossed in 
watching him that I was completely taken 
by surprise w r hen 2 more black ducks 
swept into view nearly opposite the blind. 
With a jerk my gun came to my shoulder, 
but as the report awakened the echoes I 
saw that in following the ducks my gun 
had been brought to bear on the pussy wil- 
lows, and my friend had fallen from sight. 
The ducks were gone, but 2 or 3 tiny 
feathers floated up from the willows, tell- 
ing of the tragedy of the little singer's 
death. 

I paddled the old scow out again, crossed 
the channel, and after a short search found 
him lying still, his bill opened, and drops 
of blood trickling out, as though he had 
died in the midst of a song. One shot 
had struck him in the side. The very 
stillness seemed sad as I again took my 
seat behind the blind, wrapped the sparrow 
carefully in my handkerchief and put him 
in my hunting coat. 

A duck was coming, a solitary old fel- 
low, and he looked as big as a goose. I 
was ready that time and waited patiently 
until he came opposite. 

Bang! Bang! 

He was hit hard, but up, up, he flew, 50, 
100. yes, 200, feet, and then his strength 
gave away. Those untiring wings, which 
had carried him back and forth from the 
cool waters of New England to the sunny 
rivers of' the South, could soar no farther; 
his head drooped and straight into the 
lake he fell, dead. He was marked and 
colored beautifully and as I held him up 
with the others I felt well paid for the 
time spent in the blind : though sad at the 
thought of the little fellow in my pocket. 

I trudged across the hills toward home 
with a growing appetite for dinner and a 
keen appreciation of the possibilities of ob- 
taining a good one from my game bag. 



too 



RE( HON. 



A.s I sit at ■; desk writing and look up 
at the mallard drake and the little spar- 
the cabinet, fehe vis 

of that spring ng conies before me. 



and again I see the quiet lake, the nodding 
willows and wooded hills: but above all 
there Roats a clear, -wee: song, no^ hushed 
in the sadness of a little tragedy. 



THE SICK MAN'S RKOUEST 



A. I. YEKMU.YA. 



Take me back toward the sunset, to the 

mountains of the West, 
Where all nature, sweetly smiling, 'eve... es 

of quietude and res: 
Let me see again the foothills, lee me hear 

the coyote call. 
When the Western day s dying and the 

shades of evening fall. 



Then 1 see a line of wagons crawling 
slow '.;■■ e'er the plain. 
... the shouting of the drivers, hear the 

maidens' songs again; 
jnd the camp beside the river, when the 
sun was going down. 
Wakens fond and pleasant mem'ries long 
forgotten in the town. 



For the e ay's clamor hurts me. and the 

thick air of the street 
Sweeping in my open window chokes me 

with its dust and h< 
And I think and dream of summers in the 

days : long ag 
Till my heart is torn with longing for the 

scenes I used tc know. 



- v the journey o'er the prairie, with the 
hot sun overhead. 

toward the land of promise hour by 
hour the pathway U 

Every day fresh wonders ened. e 
mile brought something new, 
our wea ness quick vanished when 
the ■ untains came in view. 



Take me back toward the sunset, to the 
mountains >f the West, 

Where all nature, sweetly smiling, breathes 

of quietude and . - 
Let me see again tie f let me hear 

the c '; tc cal 
W "a en the western is dying and the 

shades oi ei ening h 



'"Beg pardon." said the long haired 
visit is there a literarj club around 

here anywhere?" 

"Yes.'' replied the 
as he reached under his desk. Are you a 
literary man? — Catholic Standard. 






SOME HUNTING DAYS. 



HOWARD CARL. 



The deer hunting season would open 
August 1st and as peaches would not be 
ripe until about the /th there would be a 
week in which I could hunt, so I deter- 
mined to spend the time in that way. 

1 lived about 3 miles from the hunting 
ground, which necessitated my getting up 
at 3 a.m. in order to be there by day- 
light. I had been out several times with- 
out seeing game of any kind, or even a 
track, when one morning as I came up 
over the top of a ridge, I saw a coyote 
trotting along in the trail about 100 yards 
away. 

I whistled as I threw the gun to my 
shoulder, and as the brute stopped I pulled 
the trigger. I miscalculated a little and 
the bullet struck just in front of him. 
I threw in another cartridge and fired for 
a point where the trail entered the head of 
the can} r on. The bullet and the coyote got 
there about the same time, and by the dust 
that was raised I thought I had him ; but 
no, I soon saw him making tracks far down 
the canyon. 

In a big brush patch at the bottom of the 
ridge I shot the heads off 2 bush rabbits 
and went home. I was thoroughly dis- 
gusted with deer hunting and gave it up a 
while. 

It was September 20th before the last of 
the peaches and prunes were gathered. 
There were still 10 days of open season 
left, so one morning I picked up my 32-20 
rifle, and with a lunch in my pocket started 
out. I had determined to make a day of 
it that time, hunt in a new country, and 
hunt until I found tracks at least. 

The sun was well up when I got to the 
top of the ridge. As I was walking slowly 
along I heard a rustling in the leaves, and 
at the end of a patch of sage brush, I saw 
another covote trotting up the trail. I 
held just ahead of him and fired, but did 
not know anything about a sharp turn in 
the trail around a big rock. The bullet 
went singing off the rock, and the coyote 
wheeled like a flash and ran. 

He went through a little clump of tim- 
ber and came out about 75 yards below me, 
broadside on. He had not seen me at all. 
Pop ! Pop ! Pop ! went the little 32 and 
the coyote again disappeared around a 
friendly curve. I had gauged his speed 
well, as every shot went directly over his 
back, but I had not held low enough. 

I had not gone far after my adventure 
with the covote before I saw a few deer 
tracks. I followed the trail, which led me 
down into the canyon and up the opposite 



ridge. I had climbed about half way up, 
when I saw, on the ridge I had just left, 
4 deer. Hoping to get near them I crawled 
into a small gulch, and down that to the 
big canyon, taking care to keep the deer 
between me and the wind. Then I began 
the ascent of the ridge. 

I got where I thought the deer ought 
to be, but could not see them unril one 
saw me. He made a few jumps and 
stopped to look. I aimed just back of the 
shoulder and fired. As he started to run 
I saw his tail flop and I knew I had hit. I 
fired again and he jumped into the. brush 
and disappeared. I heard a great rustling 
in the brush and hurried around th'e end to 
catch the other deer as they came out. 
They did not come, so I went back through 
the cover. 

I had not gone far before I saw a deer 
in a little clear place about 75 yards away. 
I immediately fired and he started to run. 
I saw he would give me a chance for an- 
other shot as : he passed through a small, 
clear place and I covered the opening. As 
he appeared I fired and down he went. 

I went back into the brush to see if I 
had killed the first one I shot at. As I did 
not find him I returned and dressed my 
deer. 

After doing that I concluded I would 
have a drink before starting home, and as 
I was going through the brush again I 
found deer number one in a heap by the 
side of a log. 

That was more than I had bargained for. 
Talk about Friday being an unlucky day 
and 13 an unlucky number ! That was Fri- 
day and I had left home with just 13 cart- 
ridges. 

I dressed the deer and carried it where 
the other one was. They were both year- 
lings and weighed about 75 pounds apiece. 
I put one over each shoulder and started, 
but I soon found that would not work, so 
I hung one deer in a tree and toted the 
other. As I had to carry him down 
one ridge and over another I was almost 
exhausted when I got him where I could 
reach him with the buggy. 

I did not want to leave the other 
deer, nor did I want to go after him 
alone, so I went to town that evening and 
related my story to a friend. He immedi- 
ately picked up his gun, climbed into the 
buggy and went home with me. We were 
out by 3 a.m. and by daylight were on the 
ridge. As I had had plenty of shooting I 
let my friend go ahead. When we reached 
a point about 600 yards from where I had 



1 82 



RECREATION. 



hung my deer we saw a big buck about 200 
yards away. Bert fired, but shot too high, 
and the buck never moved; another quick 
shot, which fell short, and our buck left 
for parts unknown. 

The following week I went out several 
times, seeing fresh tracks, but no deer. I 
determined to quit hunting for the season, 

but one morning a neighbor, Frank C , 

came with a buggy to take me hunting. I 
did not like to disappoint him, so I 
went with him. It was after sunrise 
when we drove into the mouth of the 
canyon where we intended to hunt. Agree- 
ing to meet at a certain place, we un- 
hitched the horse and started, Frank tak- 
ing one side of the canyon and I the other. 
I soon saw tracks and followed them until 
I found they were taking me high on the 
ridge and away from the place where we 
were to meet, so I struck around through 
the timber on the side of the ridge. I final- 
ly got near the place where we were to 
meet, but the point was so steep I could 
not get down. After spending some time 
looking across the canyon, in the hope of 
seeing Frank, I decided to go back to 
where I had left the tracks. 

As I was going slowly along, a spike 
buck jumped up in a patch of sage brush. 
I could just see his head and the top of 
his back. I fired quickly and overshot 



him. He jumped over the top of 'the brush, 
but as he did so I fired again and knew I 
hit him that time. 

He ran into a small ravine full of brush, 
which led into a large brush patch. I stood 
a few minutes, thinking he or another 
deer might start over the top of the ridge, 
but as none appeared I went into the brush 
where I had seen the deer disappear. Not 
finding him I waited some time on the hill- 
side and finally saw my buck going out at 
the lower end. Pop ! pop ! pop ! and he 
stopped. 

When I cut his throat hardly a drop of 
blood flowed, but when I dressed him I 
found him full of blood inside. My sec- 
ond bullet had entered back of the ribs, 
ranged forward, broken 2 ribs on the other 
side and passed out. Of the other 3 shots, 
2 had taken effect ; one on each side of the 
back bone on the top of the rump. I packed 
him down to the buggy and waited for 
Frank, who soon came along. 

He had seen a deer but it was nearly 
700 yards away, and by the time he got 
around there the animal had gone. 

There were a few more days of open 
season left, but as I had killed the limit 
I did not go out again. I have the big 
buck listed for next year, but I want to try 
him with something that has more shock- 
ing power than a 32-20; a Savage will do. 



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COPYRIGHT BY THE N Y ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 1902. 

THE ONLY MUSK-OX IN CAPTIVITY. 



ADIRONDACK GUIDES. 



THOMAS C. KING. 



To one familiar with the guides and 
hunters of the West the famous Adiron- 
dack guides are both a surprise and a disap- 
pointment. Last summer 1 wandered about 
the Adirondack woods and lakes from 
July until November and made the guides 
a study. 

These men became famous through the 
writings of prominent litterateurs who have 
visited the North Woods. A person may 
be eminent in the professional world with- 
out being able to distinguish between good 
guides and poor ones. The transition from 
the routine of city life to the freedom and 
pleasures of the wilderness is delightful, 
to say the least; and those who experience 
that change are too apt to lavish on man 
the thanks due to nature.. Such books as 
"Little Rivers," "Camping in the Adiron- 
dacks" and "Brown Studies," are but a few 
of the delightful and charming volumes 
which have been written about camp life in 
the picturesque Saranac, Tupper, Placid or 
Ampersand regions. Those books have ex- 
alted the guides, and, it seems to me, un- 
justly so, because only a few of the older 
woodsmen are of the types described in 
them. The fishermen and camp laborers 
who hang about Adirondack hotels and vil- 
lages fall far below the ideal ascribed to 
them in books. 

Unquestionably, camp life to day is totally 
different from that of 20 years ago. Then 
the tourist came with his fishing and 
hunting outfit and was met by the same 
guide who had served him for years. Con- 
trast a season now in the Adirondacks with 
the good old time to which I refer. A city 
man coming here to spend a few weeks or 
a month, must bring 5 or 6 trunks. The 
social gaieties in which he must participate 
are, of course, not on so large a scale as 
those of the city. Nevertheless, either 
he or the members of his family must at- 
tend parties and receptions, be well posted 
in golf and tennis and, incidentally, take an 
interest in amateur theatricals. Occasion- 
ally, he may vary the monotony by taking 
a short row on the lake. The guides of 
the leading hotels receive $4 a day just as 
they used to 20 years ago, but they have 
practically nothing to do. If the visitor 
decides to go on the lake, he starts at 9 or 
10 a. m. and returns for dinner. Even if 
he takes a lunch with him, he is back by 3 
or 4 in the afternoon. Not only does he 
pay the guide's wages, but when he leaves 
the hotel he gives the guide a tip according 
to the dimensions of his pocketbook or his 
generosity. As a natural result, the guides 



183 



are spoiled. As no one wants to visit the 
real wilderness and forego the luxury and 
social pleasures of the hotels, so the guides 
of to-day know only the lakes, rivers and 
short carries over well traveled roads from 
one hotel to> another. Outside of these 
beaten paths they know nothing. 

This is well enough for those who would 
rather play golf than catch trout or 'shoot 
deer ; but I contend this does not warrant 
the application of the term guide to men 
who are really camp laborers. These men 
would starve if called on to do guiding in 
the Rocky mountains. 

Upper and Lower Saranac lakes are sur- 
rounded by camps, some of which cost up- 
wards of $100,000. Scarcely one cost less 
than $10,000. The guides procure supplies 
from the lake steamer or at the railroad 
station, take care of the children, go for 
the mail and do menial services. Years 
ago it w r as common for a party of guides 
and sportsmen to make the trip to Pitts- 
burgh down the Saranac river, a distance 
of nearly 100 miles. From Lower Saranac 
to the head waters of the Hudson, or 
through the Fulton Chain, or North to the 
St,. Lawrence were also favorite excursions. 
One or 2 trips to Fulton Chain were made 
last year, but no one went down the 
Saranac. 

Amusing stories of the greed and incom- 
petence of some guides are told by the old 
timers who winter in Saranac village. 

A wealthy woman living at a hotel on 
Upper Saranac desired to buy a coach 
horse to use in Boston. Why she voiced 
her desire in the presence of 2 or 3 guides, 
and what led her to think she could find 
blooded stock in the woods, passes my com- 
prehension. Two of the guides w T ent to 
Saranac village and bought an ordinary 
plug for $40. They put in 2 or 3 days 
brushing and polishing his coat, gave him 
certain stimulants and led him to the hotel. 
The woman paid them $175 for the re- 
juvenated skate. 

There are but few angle worms pro- 
curable on Upper Saranac. The crew of 
the little steamboat employ a boy at the 
South end of the lake to dig bait as re- 
quired. They pay him 10 cents a can. Mr. 
Blank, of Washington, is a wealthy man. 
He has a number of children and occasion- 
ally they amuse themselves by catching 
perch from the hotel dock. He told a guide 
to keep the youngsters supplied with bait. 
Two months later a bill was handed him 
for 20 cans of worms at 50 cents a can. 
"Great Scott," said he, "I made my money 



1 84 



RECREATION. 



by hard work, and when a boy I would 
have been glad to get 5 cents a can for 
worms. It seems to me the price has gone 
up." 

"Yes," replied the guide, who had a repu- 
tation for wit ; "the price has gone up but 
the worms have gone down." 

I have even heard of guides selling deer 
which their employers had shot. An old 
timer living near Bloomingdale told me 
a story bearing on this subject. He was 
employed by a New Yorker to go deer 
hunting. They were out several times, but 
saw no game. Finally, the sportsman suc- 
ceeded in shooting a good sized buck 
through the stomach. Of course, the deer 
ran and left but a small trail of blood. 
The guide told his employer it would not 



be best to follow the deer; if left alone, it 
would probably die and they could get it 
in the morning, whereas if followed it 
might run miles. The man had had 
previous experience with guides, and said: 

"Oh, no you don't. Not on your life! 
If I don't trail that deer to-night you will 
get him and sell him before I come in the 
morning." 

The guide raged ; at first to no purpose. 
Finally he prevailed on the man to trust 
him. They returned to Bloomingdale, and 
spent the nieht. In the morning they vis- 
ited the scene of the shooting and found 
the buck, dead. The sportsman made an 
apology ; but he afterward said he would 
have wagered that the deer would not be 
there. 







AMATEUR PHOTO BY W. J. TOPLEY. 



THE OLD HOMESTEAD. 
Made with Bausch & Lomb Plastigmat Lens. 



SALMON FISHING ON CHARLESTON LAKE. 



E. A. GEIGER. 



One of the most picturesque lakes in 
Canada is Charleston lake, 17 miles from 
the imaginary line dividing New York 
State from the Province of Ontario, at 
Brockville. Air. B. Loverin, the genial 
owner of the houseboat Lah-ne-o-tah, and 
a member of the Reporter Hunt club, 
promised the club a good time with the 
salmon* as soon as the ice went out, and 
accordingly April 28 was appointed for 
the members to meet at the houseboat. 
Five of us left Brockville at 3.30 p.m., by 
the Brockville & Westport Railway, and 
reached the lake at 5.30. There we were 
met by our host, who gave us a hearty wel- 
come and announced everything in readi- 
ness for the salmon. 

In the morning lots were drawn for 
positions in the boats. Mine fell to the 
boat with Byron Loverein, a son of our 
host, and a member of our club, and my 
brother Adolph, while the other boat held 
Messrs. Charles Stagg, Leonard Cossitt and 
George Beecher. We got an early start 
and soon had 4 lines in the water. We 
were not out of sight of the houseboat 
when a shout from the other boat an- 
nounced the first strike. These salmon 
never give up until landed, and after a 
good fight the anglers brought in a beau- 
tiful 8-pounder. Hardly had they landed 
their fish when my brotner got strike and 
reeled in a 6-pound salmon. Getting 
among the islands, of which there are 123 
in the lake, we lost sight of the other 
boat until noon, when we returned to the 
houseboat and found our friends already 
in, with 5 splendid salmon while we had 
but 3. These salmon weighed 3 to 9 
pounds each. 

After noon we again started out, in dif- 
ferent directions, but as the wind had in- 
creased, and was blowing from the South, 
causing quite a sea, it was difficult to keep 
out in the open water. We kept closer to 
the shores and did not have as good luck 
as in the morning, getting only one salmon 
each, of about 5 pounds. On our return 
Charlie Stagg related an experience they 
had with black bass. While fishing among 
the islands they ran into a school of these 
fish and as fast as they could put out their 
lines 8 small mouth black bass : were 
hooked, none weighing less than 4 pounds. 
As this was in the close season the bass 



*The mentioned fish is probably Atlantic salmon, 
Saltno solar. — Editor. 



iSs 



were carefully returned to the water ; still 
it gave us an inkling of what sport we 
might expect with the bass after June 15. 

The next day the wind continued strong. 
Byron Loverin decided to remain in camp 
and repair some of the havoc the storm of 
the week before had wrought on his float- 
ing boathouse, and my brother elected to 
remain with him, so we had but 2 men 
in each boat. Just as we were ready to 
leave the houseboat Messrs. Ross -and Os- 
born, of Brockville, rowed up and exhibit- 
ed a fine 11 -pound salmon they had landed 
off the high rocks a few minutes before. 
We had hardly passed the first point of 
land, Derbyshire Point, when we hooked 
and landed a 5-pounder. We soon lost 
sight of the other boat and decided to go 
Southeast, . under the high bluff shore, to 
be somewhat protected from tne wind, and 
to remain until late in the afternoon. At 
12 o'clock we landed at a cold spring, ate 
our lunch, then "climbed the high cliffs on 
Crawford's Point, at the mouth of Leeder's 
creek, where we hdd a*i excellent view of 
the lake for miles in all directions. On 
our return we had 3 and the others 4 sal- 
mon., __:. 

After supper we strolled over to Cedar 
Park, to arrange for a rig to take us to the 
station in the morning. While we were 
there Mr. R. B. Reading, of Lambertville, 
N. J., came in witn 6 salmon weighing 
respectively 3^, 4, 8^2, 9, n and 12 pounds. 
The crowning event of the dry was when 
Mr. Osborn came in with a salmon tipping 
the scales at exactly 14 pounds. These 
are not extraordinary catches for Charles- 
ton lake, as the weather was not favorable, 
either day. The limit according to our 
fish and game laws is 5 dlmon per rod per 
day, and none of the .boats reached their 
limit. 

It is impossible to describe the beauties 
of Charleston lake. It is about 8 miles in 
length and one-half mile to 6 l / 2 miles in 
width. There are few shoals and no 
marshes. The water runs to 300 feet in 
depth, and is exceedingly clear, being fed by 
many springs. The lake contains 123 is- 
lands, on many of which are fine summer 
cottages owned by Americans and Cana- 
dians. The shores vary from grassy slopes 
to high rocky bluffs rising almost perpen- 
dicularly 50 to 200 feet. There is first class 
hotel accommodation, and there are plenty 
of good guides or oarsmen to look after 
visiting sportsmen. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY ANDREW EMERINE, JR. 



A REAL FISH STORY. 

Highly commended in Recreation's Sixth Annual Photo Competition. 




THEY FOUGHT TO A FINISH. 

Made with Manhattan Camera. 

1 86 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY J. E. TYLOR. 



A BEAR AND A BATH. 



W. II. WRIGHT. 



The story of a buffalo hunt in Recrea- 
tion reminds me, in some ways, of a hunt 
I had at one time which resulted in the 
death of my first grizzly. Not that I had 
anything but the bear to fight, as the major 
did, but I had to take to a stream for 
safe keeping until the excitement blew 
over. 

For several years I had hunted and killed 
deer and black bear, with such success 
that I was anxious to try my hand at some- 
thing larger, and one summer I fixed up a 
trip for the hills with that object in view. 
For some weeks I camped around through 
the hills looking for something that would 
suit my taste, until I had spent most of the 
summer, had traveled the Bitter Roots 
from West to East and had started on the 
home stretch. I then thought if I could not 
get a grizzly, I would at least have an elk; 
so I switched from the part of the country 
I was in, followed a long ridge running 
West, and at last made camp in a bottom 
beside a large stream, which ran swift and 
cold from the snow banks in the mountains 
to the North and East. At the point of a long 
open ridge coming in from the North and 
West, were 15 or 20 acres of open bottom, 
and on the river bank was a spring all cut 
and dug out by deer and elk that used it 
as a lick. I made up my mind to get an 
elk there. Around the spring and along 
the river bank grew small brush, 3 or more 
feet high, and lying in this brush, 50 or 75 
feet from the spring, was an old log. There 
was no standing tree of any size within a 
quarter of a mile of the spring, so I 
selected a position behind the log. 
I went to the spring early, grubbed 
out some of the brush with my 
knife, fixed up a comfortable place to sit 
or lie, and made everything ready for the 
killing. The gun I was using was an old 
model 44 Winchester, with which I had had 
some trouble in other hunts, but I could 
put the slugs where I wished them when it 
did work, so I kept hanging on to the old 
thing. The extractor had become, so badly 
worn that I always had to put my thumb 
on it and bear down to bring the shell out. 
Sometimes when I was on the verge of 
the ague, I forgot to do that, and then I 
had trouble. The extractor not only failed 
to throw out the shell, but it brought up 
another cartridge, and as there was no 
place for it the old gun was useless for the 
time being. 

The river bank along through the bottom 
was 3 or 4 feet high, and the water had 
washed away the loose earth for some dis- 



tance underneath the bushes along the 
bank, leaving the roots hanging down into 
the water. It was a warm day in Septem- 
ber, and I left camo without any coat, 
thinking it would be warm enough until 
I should get my elk, or as late as I could 
see to shoot. I did not know much about 
?arae using licks then, or I should- have 
known that they do not go to licks every 
day at that time of year. I have found out 
all these things now, and know enough to 
take a coat with me when I go to watch 
for game. 

I commenced the watch, and until the 
sun got low I was not uncomfortable. 
Later I became chilly and soon my 
teeth began to chatter. I looked at my 
watch and gave that elk just 5 minutes 
more to show up. It was nearly sundown, 
and 1 was getting to a point where I would 
not stop much longer for all the elk in 
the country. I raised up to take one more 
look at that point of the ridge where the 
main trail led to the spring. After looking 
the hill all over I could see nothing, and 
was feeling blue, when on glancing up 
stream and to my right I saw an old griz- 
zly coming around the point of brush 
125 yards away. My teeth quit chattering 
at once. I dropped down behind the log, 
as the bear was coming my way and I 
wanted him close before I opened up on 
him. He was my first grizzly. After al- 
lowing him what seemed a long time to get 
to the spring, and as I could net hear any- 
thing of him, I raised my head and 
peeped over the brush. He had evidently 
been stopping to think matters over, for 
just as I looked he dropped his head and 
started my way a^ain. He was within 
75 yards and I thought he could not get 
away from me. as I could get in several 
shots before he could get out of reach ; 
so rising, I aimed to put a slug between his 
neck and the point of his shoulder. 

At the crack of the gun that old bear 
made one bound into the air, gave a bawl 
like that of an overgrown calf, and started 
at a lively gait for my bunch of brush. I 
had not figured on that. However, I did 
not feel disappointed for it would give me 
time for more shots, and I could see that 
the grizzly hide would be mine. Bringing 
the lever forward for another cartridge I 
yanked it back, and lo ! I had forgotten to 
thumb the cussed thing! There I was, 
with not a tree in sight, with a useless 
gun in my hand and a wounded grizzly 
coming my way ! I did not feel so anxious 
just then for him to get up close so I would 



.87 



1 88 



RECREATION. 



be sure of him. It looked as if other hide 
than the bear's would be decorating land- 
scapes. 

I. looked the situation over, threw the 
gun, and made for the river. In about 2 
jumps I went over the bank. As I struck 
the water I saw where it had washed out 
the soil. Catching a root I drew myself 
close under the bank and waited for the 
bear to come in after me, thinking when 
he jumped he would not see me. That 
would give me a chance to get out and 
recover my gun and possibly reach a tree. 
Gee, whiz ! The water was cold. I had 
to lie down in order to keep under the 
bank ; and I was nearly frozen before I 
took to the water. I had to hang to the 
roots to keep from washing down stream. 
The water made such a noise that I could 
not hear the bear and I did not dare look 
up for fear he was watching for me. 
There was nothing to do but wait for some- 
thing to happen. 

After what seemed half an hour, but 
which, I suppose, was about 2 minutes. I 
tried to crawl up stream a short distance, 
and then look to see what had become of 
Mr. Bear. The water made so much noise 
against my neck, that I thought the bear 
would be sure to hear me, so I srave up 
that idea and commenced to back down 
stream. That worked better, as going with 
the current I made no noise. When 30 or 
40 yards down stream, I raised up part 
way, and worked some of the ice water 



out of my clothes. Then I crawled out 
into the brush and listened for the bear ; 
but not hearing anything, I proceeded to 
scrape out some more water, Then I quiet- 
ly raised up so I could look over the brush 
but could see nothing of bruin, so I crawled 
along toward the los\ where I had left my 
gun. I have made many sneaks for game, 
but never with more forethought than I 
made that one. I reached the log and 
scarcely dared breathe for about 5 minutes. 
Then I began to look for my gun and in 
my haste to give the bear all the land there 
was between him and the river I had 
thrown it on the opposite side of the log ! 

I raised up on my knees, and as the 
bear did not charge me, I screwed up my 
courage and stood up. There lay that 
blooming grizzly, within 30 feet of the log, 
dead ! I had taken my bath for nothing, 
but I wasted no regrets, for I think the 
situation would have induced almost any- 
one to take a bath, even if the ice had to be 
broken to do it. 

I told the fellow at camp that in crossing 
the river I fell in. As camp was on the 
opposite side of the river from the lick, I 
got off without his knowing I had been 
mixed up in any way. Besides, I told him 
that grizzlies were as eas} to kill as black 
bears; that it only took one shot to kill this 
one. That was my last hunt with the old 
gun which had long outlived its usefulness. 
1 bought a new Winchester as soon as 
possible. 



TO A MIGRATORY FOWL. 



A. D. NICHOLS. 

High in the ethereal dome of darkest night, Pursued by blizzards from the Northland's 
While quiet earth is wrapped in pleasant peaks, 

dreams, By spectres of a coast ice-bound and 

You take your steady, swift, instinctive drear— 

flight Before you, sunny fields and singing creeks, 

Toward the Southland's vales and reedy And rest upon the water still and clear, 

streams. 

Blest fowl ! when life with sorrows is beset, 
Oh that we mortals, too, could wing our 
way 
To lands of peace and rest, and there 
forget 
The sorrows of our cheerless Northern 
day. 



HUNTING QUAILS AND FINDING COONS. 



E. M. DORSEY. 



Various coon stories in recent numbers of 
Recreation have recalled vividly to my 
mind an experience in Boone county, Mis- 
souri, in 1872. 

Our party left the farmhouse, where we 
had been quartered over night that we 
might be early on the shooting ground, at 
4 o'clock one November morning. We were 
equipped with shot guns, several pointers 
and setters followed us, and we purposed 
shooting quails if we could rind any. 

Before going far we discovered that our 
force had been augmented by a volunteer in 
the shape of a venerable and sleepy looking 
long eared hound of giant frame. His 
name, as we learned later, was Sing, and 
he was the dearest possession and constant 
companion of the youngest scion of the 
household we had just left. We wasted 
much good argument in trying to convince 
Sing that a hound could but be de trop 
in the company of bird dogs and bird hun- 
ters. A resort to sticks and stones proved 
equally futile. We must have succeeded, 
however, in wounding Sing's pride, and he 
evidently decided to show us that he was 
worth a whole bunch of bird dogs. 

He dashed off into the brush and before 
we had fairly resumed our march, was 
heard giving tongue in lively fashion. Ap- 
parently he had treed something. Then the 
crowd, of course, had to go to see what 
that old fool dog had found. 

At the scene of action, Sing was doing 
stunts around an old dead oak. The tree 
was about 5 feet in diameter. At 30 feet 
from the ground it parted into 3 great limbs, 
all broken off at 10 or 15 feet from the 
trunk. One of the party insisted he had 
seen, as we came up, a coon go into the end 
of one of those branches. It was so dark 
at the time that we inclined to question the 
statement. That made trouble. The of- 
fended individual swore he would not go 
another step until his veracity had been 
demonstrated. Finally one of the boys was 
sent to the farmhouse for axes. All the 
while old Sing was dancing about the tree 
like a crazy Indian, yelping incessantly. 

When the messenger returned, with him 
came the old man of the farm and his 2 
sons, tall, spare, longlegged chaps, each tot- 
ing an ax. After a good look at the tree, 
the farmer struck his ax into a log, sat 
down beside it and drawlec 

"We-e-11, Sing sez ther's coons up thar, 
an' I'll bet my Sunday clothes thar is, but 
I don't feel no call to tackle that air dry 
snag. I ain't lookin' fer hard labor." 

The deadlock was broken by Rube, the 
proud owner of Sing, who discovered a tall 
young red oak a few yards higher up the 



hill. Instantly he formed a plan of attack. 
The young tree was felled, and dropped into 
the forks of the snag. Then Rube peeled 
off his jacket and shinned up the red oak 
of the dead tree. The first branch he exam- 
ined was solid to the core. On reaching the 
end of the second he gave a whoop of tri- 
umph. 

"Ther's a hole here big enough to hold a 
carload o' coons," he cried: "But, they're 
'way down an' we'll have to smoke 'em out. 

Close examination revealed a thin place 
in the trunk, near the ground. A few blows 
with an ax opened it up, and a smudge fire 
was started in the hole. 

Rube mounted to the top of the branch 
and hung there, one foot resting on a knot 
and one leg hooked over the limb. Every 
little while he would draw himself up, look 
down the hole and yell, "More fire ! More 
fire !" 

It was then broad light, and all eyes were, 
of course, fixed on Rube and his perform- 
ances. Presently 2 heads appeared simul- 
taneously above the hole in the branch, 
Rube's and a coon's. As the latter braced 
himself for a saving rush, Rube dropped 
back, hanging by his legs and left arm. The 
coon emerged, snarling defiance, and in- 
stantly received amidship an upper cut from 
Rube's right fist, that sent the poor beast 
flying into the air. Rube had on a great 
dirt-colored felt hat with a wide, drooping 
brim. Before the poor coon had fairly start- 
ed on his flight groundward, Rube had 
clapped that hat over the hole in the limb 
and was yelling: 

"Thar he comes ! Go fer him, Sing, go 
fer him ! Sing's got him ! Sing's got him ! 
Far'well. Mr. Coon!" 

Sing despatched the coon even as his mas- 
ter spoke, and looking upward, howled for 
more. Look out below !" cried Rube, lift- 
ing his hat from the hole as one would raise 
the lid of a teapot. Out boiled another 
coon, received a body blow and sped swiftly 
to Sing's welcoming jaws. Again Rube on 
his airy perch chanted the death song. 

"Sing's got him ! Sing's get him ! Far'- 
well, Mr. Coon!" 

This performance continued until 5 coons 
had been despatched by the wireless method 
to Sing's mouth, and thence to their long 
home. That exhausted the population of 
the hole, and though Sing velped his desire 
for further employment, his work and his 
master's song of victory came to an end. 

The crowd enjoyed the affair immensely, 
and vowed it knocked quail shooting silly. 
Thereafter thev often called on Rube and 
Sing to furnish sport. They did not re- 
quire them to give bonds for faithful per- 
formance of contract, either, 
J89 



DEER HUNTING IN ARKANSAS. 



F. M. HOUDLETTE. 



In a hotel in Arkansas I chanced to meet 
5 hunters who were lamenting their inabil- 
ity to find game in quantity to suit them. 
I offered to supply a camp outfit and take 
them to ground where I could show them 
3 deer a day for a month. If I failed to 
do so, I agreed to pay the expenses of the 
trip ; but if game was as plentiful as I said, 
they were to pay all expenses and give me 
$50 for my services. The bargain was soon 
made. I telegraphed Tom, my partner, to 
meet me on the down train the next morn- 
ing. Then I got my things ready and had 
them taken to the station. 

In the morning we all boarded the train 
with a wagonload of duffle and my favorite 
dogs, Dynamite and Stranger. At 4 p.m. 
we were set down at Walnut Lake, Arkan- 
sas, and hired a wagon and span of mules 
with which to complete our journey. We 
drove 15 miles that night and pitched a tem- 
porary camp. A little before daylight, Tom 
and I got breakfast and awoke our board- 
ers. By sunrise we were again on the road, 
and it was late in the evening when we 
reached our hunting ground. 

Tom and I spent the next day in prepar- 
ing our camp for the winter, as he and I, 
at least, were billed to stay until spring. 
Our boarders went out early. About noon 
they returned, tired to death. They said 
they had not seen a thing, not even a squir- 
rel. They had, of course, moved so fast 
and so noisily that everything ahead of them 
had been driven to cover. I tried to tell 
them this, but they would not listen, and 
even hinted that they thought all the game 
of the region was in my eye. 

Finally I said I could go out at 4 p.m., 
kill game enough to last us a month and be 
back in camp by dark. They jeered at this ; 
and to convince them, I started out, with 
Dynamite at my heels, I went South toward 



Bear lake, purposing to hunt in the switch 
cane around it. When I had gone about a 
mile I noticed fresh sign and stopped to 
watch. Signaling Dynamite to lie down, 
I walked 50 yards from him and stationed 
myself beside a large tree. 

In a few minutes I saw 3 does and a 6- 
point buck feeding about 300 yards away 
The wind was favorable and I determined 
to stalk those deer. As most deer hunters 
know, when a deer is feeding he will never 
raise his head without first shaking his tail ; 
nor will he lower his head without another 
flirt of his appendage. Before the buck 
looked up I had moved 4 steps and put a 
big tree between us. In that way, watching 
my chance when the buck's head was down, 
I got 100 yards nearer. The rest of the dis- 
tance was over open ground, yet by careful 
crawling I gained another 100 yards. Then 
lying flat, I got my Savage to my shoulder 
and put a bullet through the buck's heart. 

The does ran a few yards and stopped; 2 
side by side and broadside to me. I had 
been told that a Savage would shoot 
through almost anything. I took careful aim 
at the 2 does and fired. Then, without wait- 
ing to see the effect of my shot, I fired again 
at the third doe and dropped her. Of the 2 
does standing together, the one nearest me 
fell in her tracks ; the other ran 40 or 50 
yards before falling. 

I had arranged with Tom to come 
out with the mules if he heard any shooting, 
and before long he made his appearance. 
We packed the 4 deer to camp, and the 
amazement of our boarders was laughable. 
Thereafter they were willing to admit that 
they did not know all about hunting. They 
stayed with us 2 months and soon learned 
to find game for themselves. Tom and I 
remained in camp after they left, and put 
in our time trapping. 




AMATEUR PHOTO BY C. C. SPEIGHT. 



DEER MOUSE. 
-19° 






HUNTING WOLVES IN EASTERN NEBRASKA. 



ARTHUR L. ANDERSON. 



Wolves and coyotes have again descend- 
ed on the fold in Nebraska. Scarcity of 
feed on the Western ranges and conse- 
quent diminution of the herds and flocks, 
together with the increasing warfare that 
has been waged against them, have driven 
these outlaws of the genius cams nearer to 
civilization the past winter than they have 
come in many years. At one time coyotes 
were as abundant in Nebraska as prairie 
dogs and jack rabbits; but with the reces- 
sion of the frontier they also receded and 
were nigh disappeared. 

Whatever the cause wolves and coyotes 
are again plentiful in that State. Farm- 
ers do not relish this propinquity, and 
have taken active steps to induce the in- 
truders to retire. 

Ordinary methods of dealing with the 
pests have proved inefficient. The offer of 
bounty has served but to induce the un- 
scrupulous to breed wolves for the pur- 
pose of selling their scalps to the public. 
A few years ago a bunch of enterprising 
cowpunchers gathered up hundreds of 
wolf scalps in Montana and Wyoming and 
shipped them to Eastern Nebraska and 
Western Iowa, where several counties 
were nearly bankrupt before the fraud 
was discovered. 

Such things tended to discourage the 
practice of paying bounties and left it in- 
cumbent on the farmers and stock raisers 
to fight the wolves themselves. What was 
a popular sport in the early days of the 
State has been revived, and grand wolf 
drives are being carried on in counties 
where they have not been known in many 
years. 

One of the most primitive methods of 
hunting was the formation of a cordon of 
men around a specified area, who gradu- 
ally drove to a common center all animals 
caught within the slowly narrowing circle. 
This practice was followed before 
the first dog ceased to be a wolf. 
When the Nebraska farmers decide on a 
wolf drive notice is given to all residing 
within the area to be beaten over, usually 
a space about 20 miles square. Every able 



bodied man and boy joins the hunt, for the 
fun of the thing is ample repayment to 
anyone with a drop of red blood in his 
veins. Captains are chosen to control the 
sides ; always 4, for the territory is marked 
in a square, and the beaters approach along 
its 4 sides. Ample precaution is taken to 
secure the safety of all concerned from 
anything but unavoidable accidents. JSfo 
fire arms save shot guns are allowed ; rifles 
and revolvers being too dangerous. In 
some cases even the shot gun is tabooed, 
the killing being done with clubs. 

On the day appointed the sides set out. 
The captains agree as to the points where 
the columns shall converge, the aides are 
instructed in their duties and the hunt be- 
gins in earnest. Slowly, steadily the lines 
move toward the place of meeting, which 
is of necessity an open meadow or field, 
driving everything before them. As the 
area is cut smaller and smaller the alarm 
of the enclosed animals becomes frantic ter- 
ror. Prairie chickens, quails and other game 
birds, rabbits and the like, flee in wild dis- 
may from the approach of the human 
walls ; while the wolves, seeming to realize 
the trap in which they are caught, dash 
back and forth in search of shelter or a 
place to escape. 

Those that try to break through the cor- 
don are shot as they run. Around each of 
the 4 sides stands a solid wall of men and 
boys armed with every weapon with which 
a wolf may be killed, and yet which is not 
essentially dangerous to the users or their 
companions. Here the dogs are brought in 
play. These are generally strong hounds, 
who can easily cope with a wolf in open 
fight. When the dogs are set to work the 
wolves are in the extremity of fear or of 
desperation. Some rush wildly to one side 
or the other of the square that has caught 
them, only to be shot. Others are pulled 
down by the dogs. No matter whether 
they fly or fight, death is their portion. 
Sundown of the day of the wolf drive finds 
the farmer homeward bound, rejoicing that 
a dozen to 20 more of his 4-footed foes 
have died. 



"Fifty dollars for such a little dog !" ex- 
claimed the possible buyer. "It doesn't 
weigh over 4 pounds." 

"I know, mister," said the dog dealer ; 
"but I'm not offering it to you as sausage." 
—Judge. 



THE* OLD DRUMMIN' LOG. 



BRAD L. HUBERT. 



Many autumns now have vanished since my 

brother Tim and I, 
While a-milkin' in the mornin', jest as day 

was drawin' nigh, 
Heard a bit of pleasant music kinder floatin' 

through the fog ; 
'Twas the boomin' of a pa'tridge on a well 

known drummin' log. 

Quick we left the tiresome milkin', skippin' 

quickly from the stall ; 
Softly stole into the kitchen, took the 

musket from the wall ; 
Then we hustled off like Injuns on a light 

and stealthy jog, 
Down toward the cheerin' music wafted 

from the drummin' log. 

On all fours we went a-creepin' fer a dozen 

rod er more, 
Gettin' thistles in our fingers, an' our 

breeches badly tore ; 
But we slid along with caution, through 

the damp and through the fog, 
Fer we heard the steady boomin' comin' 

from the drummin' log. 



Then we did some cautious peekin' through 

a clump of little trees; 
Gee! there set our feathered drummer, jest 

as perky as you please ; 
So we shoved the faithful musket 'cross a 

hummock in the bog, 
Allers keepin' of our optics glued upon the 

drummin' log. 

Glancin' straight along the barrel, brother 

took a careful sight, 
While we almost quit a-breathen' lest the 

bird should take a flight ; 
Then the shooter pressed the trigger, all 

his faculties agog, 
An' the smoke went rollin' forward to'rd 

the big old drummin' log. 

With our hearts jest fairly bumpin', off we 

started on a run 
To pick up our splendid pa'tridge, never 

stoppin' for the gun — 
Jumpin' Jinks ! what disappointment ! all 

our bright hopes slipped a cog; 
'Twas a knot that we had peppered on that 

cussed drummin' log. 

Then the pa'tridge jest up an' flew. 










TAKING A SUN BATH. 

T9? 



AMATEUR PHOTO BY rf, w. ,IONES. JR. 



MUSKRAT TRAPPING. 



J. A. NEWTON. 



When the trapping grounds are of con- 
siderable extent and game is plentiful, musk- 
rat trapping can be done most profitably 
by 2 men working together. 

Several years ago 1 joined forces with 
a veteran trapper known as Shepp ; it. be- 
ing our intention to "skin the river," 
as Shepp termed it, and then haul our 
boats and .luggage to the lakes in our 
vicinity, moving from one to another 
as game grew scarce. At that time 
there was no law regulating the taking ol 
fur animals and we usually began rat trap 
ping October 15. As we intended driv- 
ing to and from our traps each day, no 
camp equipage was required. We had only 
to repaint our boats and color our traps to 
hide their accumulations of rust. The lat- 
ter we did by boiling them in a dye made 
from walnut shucks or soft maple bark. 
The traps are placed in the liquor after it 
has acquired a dark color and each lot 
of traps is boiled 15 or 20 minutes or 
until they are blackened. New traps will 
not take the color until they have been 
used a week or so to rust them. 

Shepp and I owned over 100 traps be- 
tween us, and as most of them were old, 
many repairs had to be made. Then, when 
we had cut a quantitv of stakes having 
prongs at the top, we were ready for bus- 
iness. 

We were each to take one shore in set- 
ting the traps. The South shore, which I 
was to follow, presented a low, sandy 
stretch at first, with no grass or material 
to attract rats. As Shepp's side was ex- 
actly the reverse I paddled along slowly, 
watching his shrewd methods. The first 
sign noticed was a quantity of droppings 
which had been deposited on a half-sub- 
merged log. Shepp produced his hatchet 
and chopped a notch under water and just 
below the sign, large enough to contain 
the trap when set. He was careful not to 
knock off or disturb the sign. The notch 
was cut so deep that the trap when set 
would be barely under water ; the chain 
was stapled to the log, no stake being re- 
quired. 

"The rat was there last night," said 
Shepp ; "you see the top deposit haint 
dried a bit. If he had stopped coming, the 
sign would all be dry." 

A few rods farther on, a log showed 
much sign, but it lay so high a water sec 
could not be made. Shepp is always look- 
ing for just such perplexities and is pre- 
pared for them. A notch was chopped as 
before at the point showing most sign and 
lightly covered with dry, short, broken June 



grass, which was sprinkled with water to 
prevent its being blown away. In all case^> 
the trap must be covered by water or 
grass or nothing can be caught in it. 

We then came to high, grassy banks 
where rats had been climbing and digging 
up vegetable matter. 

"Now, most likely one rat did all that 
work," said my companion. "They ain't 
more'n a pair of 'em anyway ; so I pick 
out the places showin' the most diggin' an' 
set to 'em. A feller not so well posted 
would set a half dozen for one rat an' 
soon have all his traps out fer mighty little 
purpose." 

Here the traps were set at the foot of 
the scratch signs, bedded to set level and 
at the same time be barely under water, 
and the chain was staked full length in 
deep water to insure the rat's drowning be- 
fore ii could twist off a foot. 

Before many traps were set out we came 
to a large bay filled with a rank growth of 
flags and reeds and containing several 
houses on which the rats had recently been 
woiking. as indicated by material that was 
still wet. One side of a house is always 
of a gradual slope. That is the roadway 
traveled by the rats in carrying up material 
for construction and repairs. In the fall 
the trap should always be set at the 
foot of the slope and bedded level. If the 
water is shallow it should be deepened by 
the paddle, to insure drowning. 

We found several feed beds, floating 
masses of chewed flags and grasses, built 
by the rats to sit on while feeding on flag 
roots and other food. Traps were set on 
those and bedded by parting the material 
until they were submerged. The water was 
deep and the longest stakes were used. 
Some well traveled runways led off among 
the reeds and grass, and traps were set in 
a few of the most promising ones where 
they met deep water. 

A stretch of wild rice was seen where 
cuttings and signs were numerous. The 
water, however, was so shallow that to 
have set would have insured the loss by 
foot amputation of every rat caught, as 
no excavating could be done there, the bot- 
tom being hard. There Shepp used an in- 
vention of his own. Out from shore, where 
the water was 3 or 4 feet deep, he lopped 
down enough grass to form the semblance 
of a bed, and on that a trap was set with 
the water just covering it. Six or more 
of these artificial beds were made, 3 or 4 
rods apart. 

"There ! that'll ketch every rat and they'll 
git drownded, too," said Shepp. 
193 



194 



RECREATION. 



We noticed a number of burrows deep 
under water where the banks were high. 
They were set to by lowering a trap into 
the entrance. Shepp explained that the trap 
must not be pushed into the burrow, as it 
would probably be sprung without catching 
the rat; nor set too far from the entrance, 
lest the result be the same. 

Said he: "Settin' jest at the entrance the 
rat'll git caught when he dives down to 
enter; or if he's comin' out he'll git caught 
by a hind foot or his tail when he raises." 

When animals have had a rest of 6 or 
7 months the first night's trapping takes 
them unawares, as the following morning 
proved. We set 65 traps, which yielded 34 
rats, and 6 more contained feet of others 
that had twisted up in grass and reeds. 

After trapping as much of the river as 
lay within easy reach, we pulled for the 
lakes. There t